Friday, January 15, 2021

The College Experience

 


PRESENTED BY THE CITY OF SALEM
"Virginia's Championship City"

D3Playbook

JANUARY 15, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
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TOP STORY

1. The College Experience
 

College campus during fall with changing trees
by Ian Bogost, The Atlantic


"American colleges botched the pandemic from the very start. Caught off guard in the spring, most of them sent everyone home in a panic, in some cases evicting students who had nowhere else to go. School leaders hemmed and hawed all summer about what to do next and how to do it. In the end, most schools reopened their campuses for the fall, and when students returned, they brought the coronavirus along with them." 

Who’s to blame for the turmoil? College leaders desperate to enroll students or risk financial collapse; students, feeling young and invincible, who were bound to be dumb and throw parties; red-state governments and boards that pressured universities to reopen. 

But ordinary Americans also bear responsibility. They didn’t just want classes to resume in person—they wanted campuses to return to normal. By one measure, more than two-thirds of students wanted to head back to their colleges. Even parents deeply worried about the safety of their kids still packed bags and road-tripped across the country to drop them off at school. When some colleges moved to Zoom, students and parents revolted. You can understand why. It costs almost $60,000 per year to attend Brown, and that’s before room, board, books, and fees.

But what did families think they were paying for? Classes are still happening, and degrees will still be conferred. Parents and students are miffed because they don’t really buy teaching when they pay tuition. Instead, they get something more abstract: the college experience."

>> Situational Awareness: "Even though the coronavirus has massively disrupted American higher education, many colleges are already settling back into their usual routines: move-in day, rush, homecoming, and all the rest. That shocking stability is exposing a long-standing disconnect: Without the college experience, a college education alone seems insufficient. Quietly, higher education was always an excuse to justify the college lifestyle. But the pandemic has revealed that university life is far more embedded in the American idea than anyone thought. America is deeply committed to the dream of attending college. It’s far less interested in the education for which students supposedly attend."

>> Why It Matters: "In the United States, higher education offers a fantasy for how kids should grow up: by competing for admission to a rarefied place, which erects a safe cocoon that facilitates debauchery and self-discovery, out of which an adult emerges. The process—not just the result, a degree—offers access to opportunity, camaraderie, and even matrimony. Partying, drinking, sex, clubs, fraternities: These rites of passage became an American birthright."

>> Between The Lines: "Sports helped establish the traditions of that rite of passage, such as fight songs and homecoming. Adults can’t attend school forever, but they can root for their alma mater in perpetuity. For many, sports make college understandable and appealing in the first place."

>> Reality Check: "The drive to open campuses at all costs during a pandemic shows how deeply higher education has sunk its claws into the American imagination. We’ve built a large part of our society around the experience of college, but precious little around the education it provides."

>> An Eye-Opening Read
 

CONFERENCES

2.  You Say Goodbye and I Say Hello
 

Another day ... another set of announcements from DIII schools and conferences about the winter season.

Although the Middle Atlantic Conference (MAC) has elected to move forward with winter sports, the Stevens Institute of Technology Department of Athletics has made the difficult decision to opt out of the abbreviated 2020-21 winter schedule. This decision applies to MAC-related intercollegiate competition only, specifically impacting men's and women's basketball and wrestling.

Roger Williams University announced the cancellation of the winter sports season. The Hawks hope to have competitive opportunities for winter sports later this spring, if possible.

On the flip side, the Presidents’ Athletic Conference (PAC) announced its men’s and women’s basketball schedules for the 2021 regular season Thursday afternoon. The modified scheduling format consists of a nine-game, single round robin conference-only slate for each of the PAC’s 10 member schools. Both the men's and women's schedules will feature staggered starts, with games tipping off on Saturday, January 23 and running through Saturday, February 27.
 
NCAA

3. Council Withdraws NIL Legislation


by Jeremy Villanueva, NCAA


"Name, image and likeness legislation has been withdrawn from Friday’s Division III’s business session during the virtual 2021 NCAA Convention.

The Division III Presidents Council approved a recommendation Thursday from the Division III Management Council to withdraw Proposal No. 2021-01, which would have allowed Division III student-athletes to use their name, image and likeness to promote their own work product or service and endorse third-party products or services.

The pause comes a day after the NCAA Board of Governors, the Association’s top governing body, supported a postponement on anticipated votes on name, image and likeness, citing recent judicial, political and governmental enforcement events. The Division III Management Council recommended the division’s Presidents Council delay voting and reaffirm its commitment to provide name, image and likeness opportunities to Division III student-athletes “as soon as practicable,” once those concerns are worked through."

The Presidents Council also approved a one-time, three-year budget cycle in Division III for 2021-22 through 2023-24. The Division III Strategic Planning and Finance Committee proposed the recommendation of a three-year cycle over the traditional biannual cycle due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Division III finances and this time period representing the final year of the Association’s current broadcast agreement.

>> Continue Reading 
 

SPONSORED MESSAGE

 
The City of Salem and Salem Parks & Recreation along with other localities in the Roanoke Valley host a variety of softball and baseball tournaments throughout the year. We work with Roanoke County, Roanoke City, Botetourt County and Visit Virginia's Blue Ridge. USA, NSA, USSSA, Got Game, Softball Nations, Freedom Sports and ISF are organizations that bring tournaments to the Roanoke Valley.

Find out more at SalemChampionships.com


 
ADMISSIONS

4.  NYU Tops 100,000

New York University believes it is the first private university to top 100,000 applications, with a 20 percent increase this year. About 95,000 applied to the campus in New York City, and the rest applied to the campuses in Abu Dhabi and Shanghai. More than 22 percent of the applicants were from underrepresented minority groups. By comparison, Harvard University received 43,330 applicants for the Class of 2023.

 
SCORES

5.  About Last Night

Burwell Dribbling

MBB: Trine improved to 3-0 with a thrilling 73-72 win against Benedictine (0-1). Nick Bowman played hero for the Thunder, forcing OT with a hoop with 1.2 remaining and scoring the winning three-point jumper with 3.0 left.

MBB: John Burwell scored a game-high 34 points as William Peace (1-1) downed Ferrum (1-1), 93-85.

MBB: Josiah Johnson tied an American Southwest Conference single-game record for most free throws made without a miss (16) in Mary Hardin-Baylor's victory over Louisiana College.

MBB: Tristen Licon ripped the cords for a career-high 36 points to go along with 14 rebounds as Sul Ross State downed Hardin-Simmons, 77-70.

WBB: Ajanae Thomas went off for a career-best 31 points as LeTourneau (7-1) toppled Ozarks, 78-69. She is averaging 26.0 ppg. over her last three outings.
 

TRANSACTIONS

6. Comings and Goings
 
 
LAST WORD

7.  From Our Home to Yours
 

Image

The view from the head table at the NCAA Division III Issues Forum. H/T to Dan Dutcher.
 

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Thursday, January 14, 2021

BOG Supports NIL Postponement

 


PRESENTED BY THE CITY OF SALEM
"Virginia's Championship City"

D3Playbook

JANUARY 14, 2021 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

 

>> It's Thursday Morning! Might have to invest in a lottery ticket this weekend.

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>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Remember to follow us on Twitter @D3Playbook for the latest news and transactions

 
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TOP STORY

1.  BOG Supports NIL Postponement
 


The Association’s top governing body, meeting virtually Wednesday as part of the 2021 NCAA Convention, reaffirmed its commitment to providing name, image and likeness opportunities to all college athletes at the first viable opportunity.

Citing recent judicial, political and governmental enforcement events, including communication from the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division, the Board of Governors supported postponing anticipated votes in all three divisions until the NCAA can gather additional relevant information.

The Division I Council and Division II Presidents Council have tabled or withdrawn these votes, and Division III presidents will meet Thursday. The board last year directed the divisions to adopt new name, image and likeness rules to further support student-athletes.

The board was also briefed on the “Bill Russell Rule,” adopted by some in the NCAA’s membership, which directs schools to include a person from a traditionally underrepresented community in a pool of final candidates for athletics director, senior administrator, head coach and full-time assistant coach positions. Board members agreed it would be a useful strategy to increase diverse leadership in college sports, encouraging its implementation by NCAA schools and conferences across the country where compliant with state laws and regulations.

>> Continue Reading

 

THE PLAYBOOK INTERVIEW

2. Fayneese Miller
 



For our second D3Playbook Interview, we feature Fayneese Miller, president of Hamline University and chair of the NCAA Division III Presidents Council. 

You have been a ground-breaker since your days in Danville, Va., continuing to TCU and through Hamline. What has been your driving force?
 

It was never my goal to be a ground-breaker. In fact, I never realized that some even considered me one until I became president of Hamline University. I simply tried every day to make sure what I do matters and that I am in a position to influence or bring about change. I believed that I could do this even in the face of obstacles. For example, one of my graduate school professors kept a toothbrush in his shirt pocket. Whenever we passed in the hallway he would put the toothbrush in his mouth. This was to keep from having to speak or even acknowledge my presence as a graduate student in the program. Such behavior made me even more determined to succeed. Fortunately, I had other professors who were very supportive. In fact, one said to me, “when you are in my office you can cry all you want, but once you step outside my door hold your head high and never let those opposed to your presence know it affects you.” I hold my head high to this very day and will continue to do so. 

What lessons have been learned as an African-American woman in a leadership role? What do you share with students and colleagues?
 
I have learned that who I am matters not only to those with whom I work, but more importantly, to those who will come after me. I have come to better appreciate the fact that what I say, when I say it, and how I convey my messages matters. For example, when Mr. George Floyd was murdered, I knew I had to communicate my heartfelt feelings to my community. The same was true when our very notion of democracy was recently challenged. I try every day to show my authentic self to students and my colleagues. I want them to know I truly care about them and their futures. I talk about the importance of being effective decision-makers and problem-solvers. And, I talk about the importance of being a part of a team. More importantly, I frequently use John Wesley’s words to “do all the good you can.”

Presidential schedules are always full. What led you to getting involved with the NCAA and the Presidents Council?
 
I am involved with the NCAA because of my scholar-athletes. I felt as though it was important for me to better understand the organization that helps define their athletic experience. My schedule is never too full when it comes to doing something that positively impacts my students. I must admit, however, that I never realized how much time I would need to devote to the NCAA. It is a lot! 
 
What challenges do small, private institutions face in the upcoming year?

Small, private institutions are never truly free of challenges, regardless of enrollment or endowment size. The bigger challenges right now are ensuring the health, safety, and well-being of our students. A second challenge is maintaining enrollment numbers, especially with changing national demographics and the fact that it is getting harder and harder to differentiate oneself from others. I believe institutions are much too competitive; while I understand the need to be so, I also believe we need to figure out how to be more collaborative. 
 
Have you always been active in athletics? If so, what is your favorite sport/activity?

I have always been interested in athletics. At Brown, I was the faculty representative for the gymnastics team.  I was once a mediocre gymnast and track student. I am impressed by those who excel athletically and are able to balance academics and sports. I am a golfer. When my son was four years old, Tiger Woods won his first green jacket. I watched this four-year old sit in front of the television and watch Tiger play each round. He was mesmerized by Tiger and noticed that Tiger looked like him. Shortly thereafter, I enrolled my son in golf lessons.  I decided to take lessons as well (and) continue to play. Prior to the pandemic, I had a 15.3 handicap. Now, my handicap is 18.1. But, I love the game and have learned to be appreciative of the times when I can get out to play and no longer obsess over the quality of my game. 

What do you enjoy doing in your leisure time?
 
I have two activities that I enjoy. I am a prolific reader. I am rarely without a book or two in hand. My other activity is golf. It allows me to get outside my comfort zone and accept that not all happens as we might like. It also reminds me that giving up is not always in one’s best interest, keep trying no matter how hard the task.


>> Go Deeper
 
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SPONSORED MESSAGE
 

The City of Salem and Salem Parks & Recreation along with other localities in the Roanoke Valley host a variety of softball and baseball tournaments throughout the year. We work with Roanoke County, Roanoke City, Botetourt County and Visit Virginia's Blue Ridge. USA, NSA, USSSA, Got Game, Softball Nations, Freedom Sports and ISF are organizations that bring tournaments to the Roanoke Valley.

Find out more at SalemChampionships.com


 
AWARDS

3.  LGBTQ Recognition Winners




A student-athlete, a coach and a university were recognized as the inaugural Division III LGBTQ OneTeam Recognition Award winners at the NCAA Convention Honors Celebration on Wednesday.

Initiated by the Division III LGBTQ Working Group, the awards program was unveiled during the LGBTQ and Allies Reception at the 2019 NCAA Convention. The nomination period was open from February to June 2020. The selection committee reviewed approximately 40 nominations and conducted two rounds of evaluations with the purpose of identifying a standout nominee in each category.

“The student-athletes, athletics department staff and institutions or conferences doing this work are critical to making athletics a space where all LGBTQ identified folks have a right to be their authentic selves,” said Neil Virtue, Division III LGBTQ Working Group chair and swimming coach at Mills. “This ultimately will make them better student-athletes, coaches, administrators and institutions. These inaugural winners are proof the valuable work of all those that came before this time was critical to the continued journey of acceptance for the LGBTQ community in athletic spaces.”

Recipients include

  • Kenadeed Gilmour, Hamilton, Student-Athlete of the Year
  • Hillary Arthur, Willamette women's soccer coach, Administrator-Staff-Coach of the Year
  • Bridgewater State, Athletic Department-Conference of the Year

>> Read More

 
CONFERENCES

4.  It's A Go


The Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) Presidents' Council has voted to approve plans for a return to competitive athletics this winter. 

The MIAC winter sports of basketball, hockey, indoor track and field, and swimming and diving will be permitted to participate in regular-season competition. The MIAC will not host winter-sport playoffs nor conference postseason championship meets; however, participation in NCAA championship competition will be permitted for qualifying teams and individuals. To prioritize focus on student-athlete and staff safety, spectators will not be allowed at MIAC contests during the winter season.

MIAC basketball and hockey programs will begin a seven-game conference schedule on Saturday, February 6. The basketball and hockey schedules will follow a single round-robin format, wherein each participating team will play every other team once, with the team achieving the best winning percentage while completing at least 51 percent of the schedule claiming the MIAC championship and automatic qualifier to the NCAA Tournament. In addition, teams will have the opportunity to schedule up to four non-conference contests beginning on January 29. The MIAC will not host basketball or hockey playoffs in 2021. The full 2021 schedules for basketball and hockey can be found here.

>> Go Deeper
 

TRANSACTIONS

5.  Comings and Goings
 

 

LAST WORD

6.  1 Lottery Thing

 

If you came up with the five white ball numbers and the red power ball number last night, give us a call about potential sponsorship. The winning numbers were 4-19-23-25-49 and the Powerball was 14. (spoiler alert: no one had the numbers).



 

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