Monday, June 21, 2021

The Final Countdown

 

written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 
>> Good Monday Morning. How about Jon Rahm making birdies on 17 and 18 to win the U.S. Open!

>> Today's Word Count: 1,237 (less than 5 minutes)

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TOP STORY

1. The Final Countdown


Supreme Court foster care ruling raises new questions on religion

As the spring term nears a close, it is apparent that the Supreme Court will be releasing its opinion on Alston v. NCAA this week and possibily as early as this morning. Opinions are scheduled to be issued Monday, Wednesday and Friday of this week beginning at 10 a.m. And since 15 opinions are still to be released, it should be a busy week.

"There is no way to know when a particular decision will be released, nor is there any way to know which justice is the author of a particular decision until it is released on the court’s website," wrote Amy L. Howe, a reporter for SCOTUSblog, devoted to coverage of the Supreme Court of the United States 

>> NPR's Nina Totenberg shares her perspective (Between The Lines podcast)
>> A Look Back
 

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NCAA

2. Emmert: "Act on NIL or I Will"


by Ralph D. Russo, Associated Press
 

"NCAA President Mark Emmert told the association’s more than 1,100 member schools Friday that he will seek temporary rules as early as July to ensure all athletes can be compensated for their celebrity with a host of state laws looming and congressional efforts seemingly stalled.

In a memo obtained by The Associated Press, Emmert urged members to pass legislation by the end of June that would for the first time make it permissible for college athletes to earn money off their names, images and likenesses.

All three divisions of NCAA athletics have been working toward reforming NIL rules and lifting restrictions on athletes since 2019."

>> Situational Awareness: "“Since that time, many states have enacted NIL legislation and 10 state laws can take effect this July. It is therefore essential we now enact rules before the end of the month,” Emmert wrote in an email sent to presidents and chancellors, athletic directors, senior compliance administrators, conference commissioners and others."

>> Worth Noting: "Six states have NIL laws set to go into effect July 1 that will permit college athletes to be paid for endorsements, personal appearances and social media posts, setting up the possibility of patchwork rules from coast to coast for thousands of athletes."

>> Continue Reading

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CONFERENCES

3.  Atlantic East, SLIAC Add Members
 

"On Friday morning, the Atlantic East’s committee chair and Neumann University President, Dr. Chris Domes, announced the addition of Centenary University as the 7th member of the conference beginning in the 2021-22 academic year. Centenary is moving from the Colonial States Athletic Conference (CSAC).

Centenary brings 10 varsity sports to the Atlantic East Conference in 2021-22. The Cyclones will compete in the Atlantic East in the following sports: baseball, men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s cross country, men’s lacrosse, men’s and women’s soccer, softball, and women’s volleyball. For the upcoming school year, Centenary will continue to participate in the CSAC as an affiliate member for field hockey and women’s lacrosse. Beginning in the 2022-23 school year, both sports will transition to the Atlantic East."

>> Official Announcement
>> Centenary Announcement


"The St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference President's Council has officially accepted Mississippi University for Women (MUW) as a full co-educational member institution beginning in the 2022-23 academic year. Mississippi University for Women (MUW) will become the 9th member of the SLIAC and will begin competition in all 17 men's and women's conference sponsored championship sports in their inaugural year. 

MUW is located in Columbus, Mississippi; 434 miles from the St. Louis metro area. The institution is currently completing their provisional NCAA status as they transition to become a full member of the NCAA Division III in September, 2022. A co-ed public institution, MUW reinstated their athletic program in 2017 with the addition of both men's and women's sports after a 14-year hiatus. 

"The President's Council and the Conference Office obviously realize that MUW does not fit into the current geographic footprint of the other conference institutions, but everyone felt the opportunity to gain another quality member of such a high academic profile and a complete sports program was worth our efforts to be creative with our scheduling and championships," said SLIAC Commissioner Dr. Dick Kaiser."

>> Official Announcement
>> MUW Announcement

 

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FINANCES

4.  Mills, Northeastern Announce Merger



by Larry Gordon, EdSource (photo by Phil Bond, Mills College)

"Mills College in Oakland, Calif., which had previously planned to close by 2023 because of financial woes and falling enrollment, has announced a merger with Northeastern University in Boston that would keep the campus open.

The new plan would allow the historic college campus to stay alive indefinitely but would cease its tradition of serving only women in its undergraduate programs and would end its independence. The college, which last year enrolled about 960 students, would become known as Mills College at Northeastern University, and current Mills students could stay or possibly transfer to Northeastern’s main campus in Boston, according to an announcement."

>> Background: "In March, Mills (a member of the Coast-to-Coast Conference) said it would stop enrolling new undergraduates after fall 2021 and that it would “most likely” grant its last degrees of any sort in 2023. That triggered protests from alumni and students who contended the value of  campus land could help the college survive."

>> Of Note: "Men would be allowed to enroll as undergraduates, Mills President Elizabeth Hillman said. “Mills will become gender inclusive on the undergraduate level, but will forever be shaped by our legacy as a historically women’s college,” her statement said."

>> Yes, But: "It was not revealed Thursday whether Northeastern reached out to Mills first or the other way around or whether mergers with other universities were examined as well. Also undisclosed were financial details, including the fate of Mills’ endowment, which was reported to be about $190 million last year."

>> Read More
 

TRANSACTIONS

5.  Comings and Goings
 
 
1 THING

6.  Dipping and Dunking


  
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Thursday, June 17, 2021

Tokyo Bound

 

written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 

>> Welcome to Thursday. The U.S. Open men's golf championship begins today at Torrey Pines GC. I'll take Jordan and DJ, please. You can have Bryson.

>> Today's Word Count: 1,678

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TOP STORY

1. Tokyo Bound


Andrew Wilson: “If it was gonna be the last one, it was gonna be the last one”
by Michael Mariam, Emory Wheel / Photo by: Jack Spitser/Spitser Photography


"Andrew Wilson (17C), former Emory University swimmer, is headed to Tokyo, Japan, for the 2020 Summer Olympics. Wilson will represent Team USA in the 100 Breaststroke after earning a spot with his time in the U.S. Olympic Team Trials in Omaha, Nebraska, on June 14. 

At the trials, Wilson finished second with a personal best time of 58.74s, just 0.01s behind swimmer Michael Andrew who will represent the United States alongside Wilson. In a photo-finish, Wilson secured the final spot by narrowly edging out training partner Nic Fink of the University of Georgia by 0.06s. Wilson’s time makes him the 15th fastest swimmer in the history of the event and the fourth-fastest American ever.

The former Eagle is the first Emory athlete to participate in the Olympics and the first male Division III swimmer to ever qualify. During his time at Emory, Wilson was named the NCAA Division III Men’s Swimmer of the Year twice, and he set three Division III records in addition to being a national champion in five events at the 2017 NCAA Division III Championships."

>> Quotable: “I can’t say I’m surprised,” Emory swimming and diving head coach Jon Howell told the Wheel. “I feel like he’s been moving in this direction, and he was set up really well to do this. He came in as an extremely slow incoming recruit for us, didn’t make a travel squad at all in the first semester of his freshman year and really climbed up through the ladder. By senior year, he was the NCAA Swimmer of the Year and also won his first U.S. national title. I think one of his two greatest qualities, from my perspective, is that he really learned from failure.”

>> What's Next: "Competition begins on July 24, the day after the opening ceremonies are scheduled to take place." Wilson also qualified for the final in the 200 breaststroke, placing fifth in the semifinal in 2:08.48.

>> Continue Reading
 

FINANCES

2. No Return to Normal


by Mark S. LeClair, Chronicle of Higher Education

"Higher ed is in trouble. It faces a demographic crunch in 2026, when smaller high-school graduating classes will mean greater competition for students. That will lead to tuition discounting and underenrolled classes for many colleges. And yet that demographic crisis is only one of many significant challenges the sector faces. As noted by Forbes in its annual review of college and university financials, approximately 20 percent of all institutions now warrant a “D” ranking (its lowest). Many are under serious financial strain and may not survive.

Which of these colleges are truly at risk? The past provides some clues. Since 2016, colleges have failed for many reasons: changing demographics, fewer students with a religious background (impacting the many small colleges with a religious affiliation), a drop in interest in single-sex institutions, and changing student preferences for urban over rural environments. Long-established, heavily endowed elite institutions will be fine, of course, but smaller colleges vulnerable to these changes will struggle. While they may not fail, they will need to brace themselves for uniquely difficult financial circumstances.

Several colleges that were in a weakened state already have been pushed out of existence over the past year, and others have declared financial exigency. As the pandemic’s negative effects continue, it seems likely that additional institutions will be forced to take the same path."

>> Situational Awareness: "Most colleges are planning for a return to in-person, residential learning this fall, but the accepted mode of instruction may have been permanently swept away by the pandemic. Returning fully to “normal” is likely impossible as hybrid (both synchronous and asynchronous) instruction has become widely ingrained. Covid-19 also destroyed revenue streams that had taken years for institutions to develop, such as income from foreign students. Arrangements like these are likely to be suspended for multiple years, and it will take considerable time to rebuild them."

>> Reality Check: "A more fundamental challenge facing colleges is the changed perspective of what higher education is supposed to offer. Those who attended college in the 1970s and 1980s, even at top-tier institutions, lived and studied in facilities that would be regarded as wholly unacceptable today. Old and cramped dorm rooms, mediocre food, and aging labs and libraries were the norm. College was mostly a place to learn, and the amenities that are commonplace on campuses today were nowhere to be seen."

>> Of Note: "Despite the lofty goals put forth in mission statements, the most salient goal of an academic institution, one accepted by all of its stakeholders, is continued existence. Preparing colleges for 2026, while simultaneously repairing the financial damage from the pandemic lockdown, is a significant challenge — one beyond the grasp of many already struggling institutions."

>> The Final Word: "This will be a difficult five years for higher ed, but the painful transformations to come may have one benefit: Colleges will be forced to focus more on their central missions, and forgo some of the peripherals that have led our sector astray."

>> Continue Reading ($)
 

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STATES

3. Liberty, Prosperity and Free College?


William Paterson University of New Jersey - Niche
by Natalie Schwartz, Higher Ed Dive


"New Jersey lawmakers are considering whether to expand its free college program to include two years of tuition at the state's public four-year institutions for students from families earning less than $65,000. 

Gov. Phil Murphy outlined the plan in his 2022 budget proposal, which asks for $50 million to fund the program. State lawmakers have until July 1 to approve or change the spending proposal. 

Murphy signed a bill earlier this year making permanent New Jersey's Community College Opportunity Grant Program, which covers two years of tuition and fees at any of the state's community colleges for students with family incomes of $65,000 or less. 

>> Why It Matters: "The new proposal would establish a similar program for four-year colleges. However, it would only be open to full-time students, while part-time students are eligible for the community college grants. Students would be able to potentially cover four years of tuition through the programs if they started at a community college and transferred to a four-year institution."

>> Keep Reading
 

LACROSSE

4.  Rules Committee Recap
 

"The NCAA Women’s Lacrosse Rules Committee proposed a package of rules changes with the goal of making the game more efficient, beginning with the 2021-22 academic year.

All rules recommendations must be approved by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel, which is scheduled to discuss women’s lacrosse rules proposals July 21.

Shortening the duration of the game without taking away the 60 minutes on the game clock dominated the committee’s discussion. Committee members also wanted to maintain the freedom-of-movement principles that were established in the summer of 2017."

>> What They're Saying: “Our changes reflect timing efficiencies in order to best spotlight high-action playing minutes,” said Kathy Railey, NCAA Women’s Lacrosse Rules Committee chair and associate athletics director, senior woman administrator and head coach at Stevenson. “We continued our effort to keep our game safe, while maintaining the many unique characteristics of NCAA women’s lacrosse.”

>> Read More

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TRANSACTIONS

5.  Comings and Goings
 

 
1 THING

6. Thin Mint Surplus?


Yes, There's a Girl Scout Cookie Surplus | The National Interest


"Girl Scouts have 15 million boxes of unsold cookies after the pandemic curtailed the spring selling season, with many troops nixing cookie booths for safety reasons, AP's Dee-Ann Durbin reports.

  • Girl Scouts normally sell around 200 million boxes of cookies per year, or around $800 million worth.

Around 12 million boxes remain with the two bakers, Louisville-based Little Brownie Bakers and ABC Bakers in Brownsburg, Ind. Another 3 million boxes are in the hands of the Girl Scout councils, which are scrambling to sell or donate them. The cookies have a 12-month shelf life."

- courtesy of Axios

 

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Monday, June 14, 2021

Influencer Issues

 

written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 
>> Good Monday Morning. How was YOUR weekend?

>> Today's Word Count: 1,108 (less than 5 minutes)

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TOP STORY

1. Influencer Issues



by Kristi Dosh, Business of College Sports


"As someone who has built much of my career on blogging and social media, I engage in quite a few groups for female influencers and entrepreneurs. With name, image and likeness legislation going into effect in at least 17 states over the next two years—and the potential for NCAA or federal legislation—many student athletes are preparing to monetize their NIL through social media marketing.

While this is a welcome opportunity, it also brings with it new questions and issues. In an effort to educate both student athletes and administrators seeking to understand the landscape, I asked some of the influencers I saw seeking advice in Facebook groups if I could share their posts to give further insight into those questions and issues. I’ve redacted their names and brand information where requested.

Below is a sampling of what I see in Facebook groups I’m in every single day. For those interested in educating and protecting student athletes from those who will seek to take advantage in the marketplace, I thought it might be helpful to review some of the issues that come up frequently, especially since many of these student athletes won’t be receiving deals that rise to the level of involving agents or other representation."

>> Why It Matters: "The examples above with regards to pricing questions also bring up issues related to licensing and the types of rights conveyed with initial agreements with brands. Particularly with smaller brands or startups that reach out to potential influencers via DM on social media platforms, there may not be a formal contract at all. This leads to a host of potential future issues with regards to how a photo can be used."

>> The Bottom Line: "As an entrepreneur, one of the toughest things for me has always been pricing. While the wage gap in the corporate space is well-documented, studies also show women who are self-employed are still out-earned by men by 28% thanks to women setting lower rates for their work."

>> Reality Check: "It’s probably no surprise that influencers encounter issues collecting their fees from brands, particularly from smaller brands and startups they haven’t properly vetted. I don’t know about you, but I certainly wasn’t equipped to pursue collections against brands when I was 18. I expect this to be an issue many student athletes face as they begin working with brands, so it’ll be important for them to have access to resources that advise them on how to collect these payments."

>> Continue Reading
 

NCAA

2. ILC Reintroduces NIL



At the May 19 meeting of the Interpretations and Legislation Committee (ILC), the group recommended the Administrative Committee reintroduce Proposal 2021-1 (Student-Athlete use of Name, Image and Likeness for Promotional Purposes) as noncontroversial legislation.

Proposal 2021-1 was withdrawn at the 2021 NCAA Convention due to judicial, administrative and legislative concerns. As those concerns continue to be addressed, the governance structure affirms its commitment to providing name image and likeness opportunities for Division III student-athletes by reintroducing this proposal for consideration. At its April 2021, meeting, the Presidents Council endorsed the Administrative Committee to approve name, image and likeness legislation as soon as it is appropriate to do so. The committee reviewed the original proposal and is only recommending a change to the effective date.

While this was initially sponsored as Convention legislation, it is recommended as a noncontroversial proposal because adoption prior to the academic year is necessary for the orderly administration of the division’s business. This recommendation benefits the student-athletes in a manner consistent with the philosophical principles of the division and the Association and represents the fulfilment of the commitment Presidents Council made to Division III student-athletes.

>> Read More

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FACULTY

3.  FAR Orientation
 

The New FAR Orientation  will be conducted Feb. 17-19 at the NCAA national office in Indianapolis. Because FARA is not having an in-person annual meeting in 2021-22, this orientation is being held as a stand-alone event. 

FARs with less than two years of experience will be invited to apply for the program, which focuses on understanding the Division III model of athletics and exploring the role of a Division III FAR. Participants will have the opportunity to build networks of new and experienced FARs and to establish goals for engagement in the role. 

Applications will be open in the NCAA Program Hub from Oct. 1 to 5 p.m. Eastern time Nov. 15.  Selections will be announced Dec. 1. Contact Leah Kareti with any questions.
 

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COVID

4.  Rhodes to Charge Unvaccinated


Rhodes College will charge students who are not vaccinated against COVID-19 a $1,500 fee per semester, The Memphis Commercial Appeal reported.

The fee will cover testing costs.

"A campus-wide commitment to vaccination will mean that we can move towards full capacity and reduced masking allowing for the intentional in-person campus life experience that we all love about Rhodes," said Meghan Harte Weyant, vice president for student life. "We hope our students will choose to be vaccinated to keep themselves, our campus and community safe."

- courtesy Inside Higher Ed

  
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TRANSACTIONS

5.  Comings and Goings
 
 
1 THING

6.  Alexa, Who's Our Winner?




An auction for a ride into space next month alongside Jeff Bezos and his brother ended yesterday with a winning bid of $28 million, AP reports.

  • The Amazon founder's rocket company, Blue Origin, didn't disclose the winner's name following the live online auction.
  • The identity will be revealed in a couple weeks — closer to the brief up-and-down flight from West Texas on July 20, the 52nd anniversary of the moon landing by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin.

More than 7,500 people from 159 countries registered to bid.

- courtesy of Axios
 

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