Friday, October 16, 2020

Back to Court

 


D3Playbook

OCTOBER 16, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III


 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Friday Morning! 

>> Today's Word Count: 989

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>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII. Remember to follow us on Twitter @D3Playbook
 
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1.  Back to Court
 

by Brent Schrotenboer, USA TODAY (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)


"The NCAA made a big move to benefit athletes on Wednesday, announcing proposed rules changes that would allow players to finally profit from product endorsements, autograph sales and other promotional activities.

But that doesn’t mean the NCAA is willing to let go of the concept of amateurism in college sports.

To the contrary, the NCAA petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday in an effort to save amateurism and avoid having to give players more than their current compensation, which has been restricted to the cost of attending college.

The two moves, coming a day apart, seem contradictory but are on separate tracks with money coming from two different potential sources:

  • The legislative proposals would allow third parties to pay athletes for endorsements, autographs and the like, subject to certain conditions. Athletes previously were subject to loss of their eligibility in sports if they accepted such payments from third parties. The proposed rules changes now are headed for final vote in January.
     
  • The Supreme Court petition stems from a lawsuit against the NCAA brought by plaintiffs including former West Virginia running back Shawne Alston. In that case, U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken issued a permanent injunction in March 2019, ruling that NCAA's limits on compensation for athletes in major college football and basketball were in violation of antitrust laws and an unreasonable restraint on trade.


>> What's Next: The Supreme Court could decide by the end of the year not to take up the case, leaving the injunction intact after other unsuccessful appeals by the NCAA. Or the Supreme Court could agree to hear the case and decide later, probably well into next year.

>> Worth Noting: In its petition to the Supreme Court, the NCAA says the 9th Circuit erred in this case and that amateurism has been a hallmark of NCAA sports for many decades. It says these “revolutionary changes to the way NCAA administered athletics have existed and operated for decades — and other far-reaching consequences, including for other sports leagues and joint ventures — warrant the Court’s review.”

>> Go Deeper

 

 

2.  Three for the Show
 
 
Division III has three of the nine finalists for the 2020 NCAA Woman of the Year. The finalists were selected for their outstanding achievements in academics, athletics, community service and leadership.

The Woman of the Year will be announced during a virtual awards show on Friday, November 13, and will be streamed at NCAA.org/WOTY, ESPN and on the NCAA twitter account.

DeAnna Hernandez

School: Texas Lutheran University
Conference: Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference
Sport: Softball
Major: Biochemistry
Hometown: Sugar Land, Texas

Arielle Johnston

School: Salisbury University
Conference: Capital Athletic Conference
Sport: Field hockey
Major: Community health
Hometown: Crisfield, Maryland

Emma Morgan-Bennett

School: Swarthmore College
Conference: Centennial Conference
Sport: Volleyball
Major: Medical anthropology
Hometown: New York City


>> Read more about the three finalists
 

3. Enrollment Trends Downward

by Madeline St. Amour, InsideHigherEd.com

 

"The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center has bad news. Again.

Its latest fall 2020 enrollment report continues to show downward trajectories nearly across the board in higher education. As of Sept. 24, undergraduate enrollment is now 4 percent lower than it was last fall -- a 1.5-percentage-point decrease from earlier this semester.

This latest report includes data from more colleges. It's based on reporting from about 54 percent of postsecondary institutions, or data for 9.2 million students, compared to 22 percent of institutions earlier this fall. The next update is scheduled for Nov. 12.

The largest declines of all are in first-year students. Just over 16 percent fewer freshmen have enrolled this fall compared to last year."

>> Yes, But: "Somewhat surprisingly, public and private nonprofit four-year institutions are doing relatively well, said Douglas Shapiro, executive director of the clearinghouse, during a webinar presenting the report. Compared to expectations for those colleges, they are in "fairly good shape, all things considered," he said. Undergraduate enrollment is down 1.4 percent at public four-years and 2 percent at private nonprofits."

>> Read More



 

4.  Conference Call

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with those formed over 100 years ago.
 

Conference: Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Commissioner: Jenn Dubow
Headquarters: Laguna Niguel, Calif.
WebsiteTheSCIAC.org
  • Founded: 1915
  • Remaining Charter Members (5): Cal Tech, Occidental, Pomona, Redlands, Whittier
  • Other Core Members: Claremont McKenna (1947), Harvey Mudd (1958), LaVerne (1971), Pitzer (1971), Scripps (1976), Cal Lutheran (1991), Chapman (2011)
  • Joint Arrangements: Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, Pomona-Pitzer
     
  • Oldest: Chapman (1861)
  • Largest: Chapman (6,775)
  • Smallest: Cal Tech (948)
  • Longest Trip: 110 (Cal Lutheran to Redlands)
  • Championship Sports: 21

>> Monday: Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference


sources: Google Maps, EADA

 

5. Comings and Goings
 
 
6.  1 Charging Thing


On Tuesday, Apple announced its new iPhone 12 models will no longer come with a charging brick—or earbuds—in the box. Now, Apple will only include a USB-C-to-Lightning charging cable.

This is good news!

The old 5-watt brick is painfully slow, huffs and puffs at even the thought of powering an iPad and is years behind what you can get from an accessory maker for the cost of a breakfast at IHOP. 

The real charger Holy Grail is that single brick that powers it all. Just picture it: one wall socket powering up your phone, laptop, tablet, AirPods, smartwatch and sundry other tech-whatchamacallits, all at the same time.

We have the answers for you.

>> Read More and have a great weekend

 

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Thursday, October 15, 2020

Scraping Together a Season

 


D3Playbook

OCTOBER 15, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III


 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.


>> Good Thursday Morning!  

>> Today's Word Count: 1,067.

>> Today's Subscriber Count: 1,492.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII. Remember to follow us on Twitter @D3Playbook

 
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1.  Scraping Together A Season



by Liz Robbins, New York Times (photo by Julia Rendleman) 
 

"Soccer drills in socially distanced quadrants. Masked volleyball players in gyms. Padlocked fields. Positive tests. Zoom team meetings. Canceled. Postponed. Competing. Stay tuned.

This is the collegiate student-athlete experience in fall 2020, one that is as dizzying as it is disproportionate. Since March, college sports on every level have been fundamentally disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic.

Some fall sports are competing, but that varies by region, by community, by politics, by division, by conference and even by team. College football, that billion-dollar machine, picked up momentum when the Big Ten reversed course to play a fall season, despite multiple outbreaks of Covid-19 and cries of outrage that unpaid athletes were risking their lives.

But what about sports and colleges that do not generate huge revenues and that play for the love of the game? The largest number of student athletes in the country compete on the Division III level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, numbering more than 196,000. Unlike their Division I counterparts, they do not receive athletic scholarships, nor are they generally as physically gifted. But they are just as competitive."

>> Situational Awareness: "The (NCAA) plan is to have fall sports compete in their conferences alongside winter and spring sports after January. But that is only if Covid-19 testing protocols — no positives within 72 hours of competition — can be followed. For Randolph-Macon to have all its 18 teams competing in the spring semester, that would entail some 5,550 tests, Jeff Burns, the athletic director, said he calculated. In early September, he said tests were costing $73 each. For small colleges, that math would simply not be feasible. And even if the price dropped substantially, Burns added, would those cheaper tests be accurate?"

>> Between The Lines: "For the member schools of Division III, athletics drive enrollment. But just as important to many schools as tuition fees are housing fees. “If you have a thriving athletic program where you have 30 to 40 percent of your students participating, they’re on campus — and schools make money on dorms,” said Steve Ulrich, who for 26 years was the executive director for the Centennial Conference in Lancaster, Pa., and now writes a Division III newsletter."

>> The Big Picture: “I understand the decision, and we have to be that role model if we’re producing all this data and everyone is following our lead,” Johns Hopkins field hockey sophomore Sadie Abboud said, “but at the same time, it’s tough seeing so many other schools are going back.”

>> The Final Word: “We are building toward a time frame where we are counting on faster, more reliable, cheaper testing,” said Jay Jones, the commissioner of the Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference, based in Indiana. “If that doesn’t happen, D-III is in a world of hurt.”

>> Worth Your Time
 

 

2.  NCAA Championship Sites


The NCAA announced more than 450 selections of host sites for preliminary rounds and final sites of championships in Divisions I, II and III, with most to be held from 2022-23 through 2025-26.

Here are some upcoming DIII locations with host institutions

2022-23

  • Baseball (American Rivers Conference)
  • Women's Basketball (Trinity, Conn.)
  • Cross Country (Olivet)
  • Field Hockey (Washington and Lee)
  • Football (Stevenson)
  • Men's Golf (Transylvania)
  • Women's Golf (Oglethorpe)
  • Men's Lacrosse (Drexel)
  • Women's Lacrosse (Old Dominion Athletic Conference)
  • Rowing (Temple)
  • Soccer (ODAC)
  • Softball (East Texas Baptist)
  • Swimming and Diviing (ODAC)
  • Tennis (Oglethorpe)
  • Track, Indoor (Birmingham-Southern)
  • Track, Outdoor (St. John Fisher)
  • Men's Volleyball (Stevenson)
  • Women's Volleyball (Saint Vincent)
  • Wrestling (Ferrum)

2023-24
  • Men's Basketball (Manchester)
  • Women's Basketball (Capital)
  • Cross Country (Dickinson)
  • Field Hockey (Christopher Newport)
  • Football (ODAC)
  • Men's Golf (Nevada-Las Vegas)
  • Women's Golf (Transylvania)
  • Men's Ice Hockey (Trinity, Conn.)
  • Men's Lacrosse (Drexel)
  • Women's Lacrosse (ODAC)
  • Rowing (Marietta)
  • Soccer (ODAC)
  • Softball (ODAC)
  • Swimming and Diving (ODAC)
  • Tennis (Washington, Mo.)
  • Track, Indoor (Norfolk State)
  • Track, Outdoor (Coastal Carolina)
  • Men's Volleyball (Loras)
  • Women's Volleyball (Claremont-Mudd-Scripps)
  • Wrestling (UW-La Crosse)


>> Complete List


 

3.  All The World's a Stream


The Centennial Conference announced Wednesday it has reached a formal partnership agreement with BlueFrame Technology to create an end-to-end digital network for all 11 of its member institutions for the next three years. 

The Centennial Conference Digital Network is now available on the web (https://www.centennialconference.tv/) along with streaming applications for television and mobile devices, including Android TV, Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Roku (TV), iOS, Android (mobile) and Amazon Fire Tablet. The app can be found and installed by searching for the Centennial Conference Network or CC Digital Network. 

"The Centennial Conference Digital Network has been a hallmark of our conference for several years and it is exciting to provide our viewership with an unparalleled experience," added Executive Director Portia Hoeg. "One of our many enhancements will include closed captioning for our championship events."

>> Read More

 

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4.  Conference Call

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with those formed more than 100 years ago.
 

 
Conference: Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
Commissioner: Dan McKane
Headquarters: Bloomington, Minn.
WebsiteMIACathletics.com
  • Founded: March 15, 1920
  • Remaining Core Members (7): Carleton, Gustavus Adolphus, Hamline, Macalester, Saint John's, St. Olaf, St. Thomas
  • Other Core Members (7): Concordia (1921), Augsburg (1924), Saint Mary's (1926), Bethel (1978), St. Catherine (1983), St. Benedict (1985), St. Scholastica (2021).
     
  • Oldest: Hamline (1854)
  • Largest: St. Thomas (6,155)
  • Smallest: Saint Mary's (1,098)
  • Longest Trip: 347 miles (Concordia to Saint Mary's)
  • Championship Sports: 22
     
>> Tomorrow: Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference

sources: Google Maps, EADA

 
5.  Comings and Goings
 

 
6.  1 Chain Thing

 

The coronavirus pandemic is splitting the restaurant industry in two. Big, well capitalized chains like Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. and Domino’s Pizza Inc. are gaining customers and adding stores while tens of thousands of local eateries go bust.

Larger operators generally have the advantages of more capital, more leverage on lease terms, more physical space, more geographic flexibility and prior expertise with drive-throughs, carryout and delivery. 
 

  • Winners: McDonald's, Papa John's, Chipotle and Wingstop
  • Losers: independent neighborhood restaurants

>> Be Smart: “With just one location, there are just no levers to pull,” said Camilla Marcus, a co-founder of the Independent Restaurant Coalition, which is lobbying Congress to pass a stimulus package backed by House Democrats that would allot $120 billion for the sector.

>> Continue Reading

 
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Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Warning Shot?

 


D3Playbook

OCTOBER 14, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III
 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
 
>> Good Wednesday morning! 

>> Today's Word Count: 1,482. Six minutes, tops.

>> @D3PlaybookDo you follow us on Twitter? 1,621 followers do. All the latest moves in Division III can be found there throughout the day.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
1.  Warning Shot?

Cross Country: NCAA Championships
by Dennis Dodds, CBS Sports.com
 

"Sixty-one percent of Power Five schools support establishing their own division within the NCAA that could decide its own operating rules, a Knight Commission survey revealed Tuesday. The survey was the deepest and most significant look at a separate question that has grown within the college athletics world: whether Power Five schools would one day consider breaking away from the nation's collegiate amateurism governing body.

The survey also revealed less than half (44%) of all respondents (351 Division I schools) support the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) actually separating from the NCAA.

The survey by the reform-minded commission was conducted in June and July of this year. The commission concluded there was a "wide dissatisfaction with how Division-I college sports are run." After contacting those 351 schools that make up the core of the NCAA, there was "overwhelming support for major reform" of NCAA governance, the commission concluded.

>> What It Means: "These 65 schools would become a completely new division of the NCAA in all sports except basketball," said Michael Cross, a Knight Commission consultant who summarized the question.

>> History Lesson: "The last time the NCAA separated into divisions in football was 1978 when Division I became Division I-A (now FBS) and Division I-AA (now FCS). The reason then would be the same reason now: The largest schools want more financial and governance autonomy because they generate the most revenue."

>> The Final Word: "There is little satisfaction with [NCAA] governance, and the finances of college athletics are broken," Cross said during the presentation to media.

>> Continue Reading

 


2.  NIL Approval Expected Wednesday

 

by Pat Forde and Ross Dellenger, Sports Illustrated


"The NCAA is on the cusp of finalizing legislation to allow athletes to be compensated for their name, image and likeness—an expected but historic move.

The governing body of college athletics has presented its latest draft on how to govern athlete compensation to members of the Division I Council, who are expected to approve the proposal at a meeting Wednesday. Formal approval, though, would not come until January. Sports Illustrated obtained a copy of the 22-page document, which details changes to NCAA legislation based on new NIL concepts developed by the NCAA D-I Name, Image and Likeness Legislative Solutions Group.

As expected, the legislation grants athletes the right to use their name, image and likeness (NIL) to:

  • Promote private lessons and business activities and operate their own camps and clinics, as long as they do not use school marks.
  • Profit from endorsing products through commercials and other ventures, as long as they do not use any school marks or reveal the school in which they attend. 
  • Be compensated for autograph sessions, as long as they do not occur during an institution event or competition and no school marks or apparel is used during the sale of the material.
  • Solicit funds through crowdfunding, such as GoFundMe, for non-profit or charities, catastrophic events, family hardships and educational experiences, such as internships.

>> Between The Lines: "However, there are restrictions to what products an athlete can endorse. The legislation would prohibit athletes from engaging in activities involving a commercial product or service that conflicts “with NCAA legislation,” including sports wagering and banned substances, the document says."

>> Rules of Engagement: "College recruits are afforded the opportunity to enter NIL activities, but they must report and disclose all deals before signing with a school. Boosters are allowed to engage with athletes in NIL “provided no improper inducements or extra benefits are provided,” the document says."

>> Keep Reading
 

 

3.  Oxy Drops Football


Oxy Edged 34-31 at Willamette

Occidental College will discontinue its football program, ending three years of deliberations about its future that ultimately reflect the unique challenges specific to Occidental football and the substantial financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, President Harry J. Elam, Jr. announced Tuesday.

The difficult decision, backed by the school’s Board of Trustees, leaves Occidental—a founding member of the Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC)—with 20 men’s and women’s sports that compete at the NCAA Division III level.

“We maintain an unwavering commitment to athletics as a critical and necessary component of the Oxy liberal arts experience, and we fundamentally believe in maintaining strong and well-supported athletic programs,” Elam said in a campus email sent after players and coaches had been notified. (Occidental is fully remote this fall as a result of the pandemic.)

>> Quotable: “Only after very careful consideration and a thorough review of past planning efforts, as well as with the deepest regard for the context and history of football at Occidental, do we make this decision,” Elam said. “As difficult as this decision is, we believe it is the right one for Occidental.”

>> Quotable II: “We are often at a disadvantage competing against teams that draw upon larger pools of prospective student-athletes, or in some cases, have larger endowments and greater resources on which they can draw,” he said. “As a result, despite the best efforts of our dedicated coaching staff, we have found it increasingly difficult to consistently recruit at the level we would need to be competitive.”

>> Be Smart: "Occidental is not the first nationally ranked liberal arts college to make the difficult decision to discontinue football, nor even the first SCIAC school to do so. Caltech stopped playing football in 1993. More recently, Swarthmore cut its football program—one of the country's oldest—in 2000; Colorado College discontinued its 126-year-old football program in 2008."

>> Read the Occidental press release

 

 

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4.  Swat Says No Spring Sports


Swarthmore College president Val Smith announced that only juniors and seniors will be invited to live on campus for the spring semester and that no student is required to return to campus. The school also announced that it expects that the majority of spring semester classes will be taught remotely, even for those students who are on campus.

In light of this announcement, the College's athletic department added that it will not be participating in intercollegiate competition in spring 2021.


>> Read More


 
5. Conference Call
 
Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with those formed before our parents' times.
 
Midwest Conference

Conference: Midwest Conference
Commissioner: Heather Benning
Headquarters: Grinnell, Iowa
WebsiteMidwestConference.org
  • Founded: May 12, 1921. Originally formed as the Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference. Created in 1994 with merger of MCAC and Midwest Athletic Conference for Women.
  • Remaining Charter Members (4): Beloit, Cornell, Knox, Lawence
  • Other Core Members (4): Ripon (1923), Monmouth (1924), Grinnell (1940), Lake Forest (1974), Illinois College (1982), St. Norbert (1982)
  • Associate Members (2): Chicago (FB), Macalester (FB)
     
  • Oldest: Illinois College (1829)
  • Largest: St. Norbert (2,080)
  • Smallest: Ripon (786)
  • Longest Trip: 423 miles (Illinois College to St. Norbert)
  • Championship Sports: 20

>> Tomorrow: Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference


sources: Google Maps, EADA

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 
 
7.  1 Chair Thing
 

Herman Miller chairs are among the finest — and they once were highly sought after to furnish offices around the country. Now, thousands of them are collecting dust in a New Jersey warehouse.

  • "Executive Liquidation Inc. in Moonachie, N.J. ... emptied the offices of a major consulting firm back in March," the Wall Street Journal's Rachel Wolfe writes. It now has more than 25,000 office chairs and 1,000 desks at that location.
  • The chairs, which retail for thousands, are selling for steep discounts — around 80% off.

If you're not sure how much longer you'll be working from home and you haven't yet invested in a chair that doesn't kill your back, get online and see what's out there. There's apparently never been a better time to buy a $1,000 office chair.

- courtesy of Axios
 

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