Friday, October 2, 2020

Retirement Wave Hits Presidents

 


D3Playbook

OCTOBER 2, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III


 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
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1.  Retirement Wave Hits Presidents


by Emma Whitford, InsideHigherEd.com

"Dozens of college presidents have announced that they will retire or otherwise step down before or at the end of June 2021, the close of the current fiscal and academic year.

The pandemic provides an unusual backdrop for leadership transitions, although many retiring presidents have said the pandemic was not the primary reason for their departure.

The apparent flood of retirement announcements makes perfect sense, said Rod McDavis, managing principal at AGB Search, a higher education leadership search firm. Many presidents who would have announced their departures in the spring held off. Instead, they’re sharing their plans this September, alongside other planned fall announcements.

“Because of the pandemic, I think most presidents who were planning to step down simply didn’t want to make an announcement, because you don’t want to make that type of announcement with a crisis occurring,” McDavis said.

>> Why Now?: "Fall announcements in particular fit well into the rhythm of the academic year, said Ted Mitchell, president of the American Council on Education and a former U.S. under secretary of education in the Obama administration. He could not say for sure whether the recent number of announcements is unusually high this year."

>> Reality Check: "The increasing age of college presidents could also be behind the many retirement announcements. A 2017 ACE study found that the average age of college presidents is ticking upward, from 60.7 in 2011 to 61.7 in 2017. More than 10 percent of presidents were 71 or older in 2017, and presidents are spending less time in their jobs than they used to. The average presidential tenure was 6.5 years in 2017, down from seven years in 2011."

>> Between The Lines: "Running a college is never easy, but the pandemic has exacerbated already-existing financial woes for many colleges and added a slew of public health concerns that have kept colleges under the national microscope. On top of that, a shift in national demographics is expected to move student bodies away from the wealthy 18- to 24-year-old white students many institutions traditionally served, increasing colleges’ need for robust financial aid and flexible programs."

>> The Final Word: “College presidencies are very hard jobs, and there’s not a lot of evidence that they’re going to get easier any time soon,” Mitchell, a former president at Occidental, said.

 

>> Continue Reading

 


2. A Century in the Making

 

Congratulations to our friends at the Midwest Conference who are celebrating their 100th anniversary in 2020-21. The MWC is comprised of 10 institutions across Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin.

The purpose of the Conference since its formation has been to "maintain athletic activities on a plane in keeping with the dignity and high purpose of liberal education." Competitive sports are regarded as a valuable part of the educational experience and are maintained for the benefit of the students.

>> Continue Reading

 

3.  Campbell Trophy
 

The National Football Foundation & Hall of Fame released the names of 40 Division III students among its 199 semifinalists for the William V. Campbell Trophy. In its 31st year, the award recognizes an individual as the absolute best football scholar-athlete in the nation for his combined academic success, football performance and exemplary leadership. 

Nominated by their schools, which are limited to one nominee each, candidates for the awards must be a senior or graduate student in their final year of playing eligibility, have a GPA of at least 3.2 on a 4.0 scale, have outstanding football ability as a first team player or significant contributor and have demonstrated strong leadership and citizenship. 
  • Alek Jacobs, Augustana
  • Jack Carroll, Berry
  • Nicholas Leahy, Bowdoin
  • Travis Johnston, Case Western Reserve
  • Blaine Hawkins, Central
  • Connor Stoming, Concordia, Wis.
  • Jackson Hamersly, DePauw
  • Garrett Perschy, Franklin & Marshall
  • Cress Fisher, Gallaudet
  • Rick Johnson, Grinnell
  • Tyler Howerton, Hampden-Sydney
  • Jamie Pogue, Hardin-Simmons
  • Kyle Hackett, Hobart
  • Andrew Vito, Ithaca
  • John Colasacco, Lake Forest
  • Kyle Pierce, Lycoming
  • Jacob Burkhead, Massachusetts Dartmouth
  • Pete Huggins, Middlebury
  • Drew Hopkins, Millsaps
  • Jackson Buskirk, Moravian
  • Lucas Cooper, Ohio Wesleyan
  • Calhoun Helmberger, Redlands
  • Mitch Batschelett, Rhodes
  • Chris Backes, Saint John's
  • Jack Massie, Shenandoah
  • AJ Smith, Springfield
  • Zach Bennett, St. Thomas, Minn.
  • Liam McManus, SUNY Maritime
  • Michael Edmonson, Trinity, Texas
  • Khalif Jeter, Tufts
  • Matt Restifo, U.S. Merchant Marine
  • Andrew Whitaker, Washington, Mo.
  • Glenn Smith, Wesleyan
  • Cameron Mika, Westminster, Pa.
  • Ryan Schwartz, Wheaton, Ill.
  • Ryan Stecklein, Widener
  • Michael Olsen, UW-Oshkosh
  • Bailey Roux, UW-Stout
  • Quinn Meinerz, UW-Whitewater
  • Eric Kraus, Wooster
     
4.  Conference Call

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with those formed in the 1960s
 

Conference: USA South
Founded as the Dixie Intercollegiate Athletic Conference; changed name in 2003
Commissioner: Tom Hart
Headquarters: Rome, Ga.
WebsiteUSASouth.net
  • Founded: 1963
  • Remaining Charter Members (2): Methodist, North Carolina Wesleyan 
  • Other Core Members (16): Greensboro (1966), Averett (1978), William Peace (2003), Mary Baldwin (2007), Meredith (2007), LaGrange (2012), Maryville (2012), Piedmont (2012), Covenant (2013), Huntingdon (2013), Agnes Scott (2016), Salem (2016), Wesleyan, Ga. (2016), Berea (2017), Brevard (2017), Pfeiffer (2017)
     
  • Oldest: Maryville (1819)
  • Largest: North Carolina Wesleyan (1,676)
  • Smallest: Salem (552)
  • Longest Trip: 667 miles (Huntingdon to Mary Baldwin)
  • Championship Sports: 18

>> Monday: Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference


sources: Google Maps, EADA

 

5. Comings and Goings
 
 
6.  1 Fall Thing
 



Why do people go to New England in the fall? This is one of the reasons.
Have a great weekend.
 

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Thursday, October 1, 2020

Champs Committee Plans for Winter

 


PRESENTED BY CHI ALPHA SIGMA
"recognizing college student-athletes who excel both on and off the field of competition."

D3Playbook

OCTOBER 1, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III


 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

 

>> Good Thursday Morning!  Happy first day of October.

>> Today's Word Count: 1,546. Easy to read. Easy to digest. Get ready for the weekend.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  Champs Committee Plans for Winter
 

by Greg Johnson, NCAA


"The Division III Championships Committee on Tuesday proposed selection dates and bracket sizes for the 2021 NCAA winter championships.

All recommendations will move forward through the governance process, where they must be supported by the Division III Management Council on Oct. 19-20. 

Two weeks ago, the committee voted to recommend that all winter and spring 2021 national championship brackets and field sizes (team and individual) not exceed 75% of their standard capacity. During the meeting, it reaffirmed this decision. 

Committee members emphasized the driving principles of filling out the brackets in each sport, protecting conference automatic qualification access to championships and providing access to schools unaffiliated with automatic qualification when warranted. However, brackets could be reduced if national sponsorship of a sport decreases."

>> Quotable: “The Division III Championships Committee would like to thank the sport committees for providing their comments and suggestions about bracket composition,” said Kiki Jacobs, committee chair and director of athletics at Roger Williams. “These are difficult decisions that have to be made right now.”  

M/W Basketball

  • Bracket Size: 48. Selection Announcement: March 7
M/W Ice Hockey
  • Bracket Size: men-9, women-8. Selection Announcement: March 14
M/W Swimming
  • 293 women and 195 men will compete. Selection Announcement: March 10.
M/W Indoor Track and Field
  • Individual and relay event sizes reduced to no more than 75%. Selection Announcement: March 7
Wrestling
  • 135 wrestlers will compete. Selection Announcement: March 1

>> Continue Reading 

 
2.  Enrolling the Class of COVID


by Eric Hoover, Chronicle of Higher Education


"A vice president for enrollment management must bend chaos into order, conquer uncertainties, and deliver The Class the College Needs. But the pandemic had blunted the tools of his trade: No predictive model accounted for a deadly, globe-crippling threat; no algorithm revealed how many freshmen would show up. Or if bringing them to campus was the right thing to do.

This is the story of how Muhlenberg College — a small, tuition-dependent institution in an ultracompetitive market — navigated the spring and summer of 2020, as seen through the eyes of a seasoned enrollment official. Robert G. Springall, a trim 51-year-old who typically seems jacketed in an extra layer of calm, helped lead an all-hands-on-deck campaign of constant communication, careful planning, and rapid adjustments. The college sought to preserve a sense of community, its signature offering, in a socially distanced age. Though science shaped the answer, getting through was an act of faith.

Enrolling a class is a major chore. Springall found it harder each year to meet goals for revenue and student diversity while also increasing academic quality. Muhlenberg lies in the Lehigh Valley, crowded with small, comparable colleges, on the eastern side of a state with a declining number of high-school graduates.

Muhlenberg, with about 2,000 students, occupies higher education’s vast middle tier. Last year it accepted 66 percent of its applicants. Its sticker price was about $69,000 a year; its average net price was about half that.

Though heavy discounting is a necessity, it can’t prevent surprises. Last fall, Muhlenberg planned for 570 freshmen but ended up with 538. A record proportion of those who had sent deposits — 69 students in all — weren’t enrolled by the deadline to add or drop classes. They had either deferred their admission or bowed out. Summer melt, it’s called.

Now the pandemic threatened to cause even greater melt."

>> Quotable: “It’s important to make sure students know ‘We hear you. … Now we’re going to help get you an answer.’" - Chelsea Schoen, associate director of admissions

>> Reality Check: "The Centennial Conference suspended fall sports, erasing Muhlenberg’s football season, which would affect 25 first-year students planning to suit up for the Mules. And Dickinson College, a competing liberal-arts institution in Carlisle, Pa., announced that it would go fully remote this fall, which gave Muhlenberg officials pause."

>> Bottom Line: "A college can do many things to build and maintain a community, but none of it is enough if a family can’t afford the price of membership, or feels entitled to more aid than a college can or chooses to give."

>> Worth Your Time

 


3.  Challenge Accepted
 

Image


"During the month of October, the seven Atlantic East Conference field hockey programs will participate in a 100-mile challenge set forth by Wesley College.

Each individual on the field hockey team will attempt to complete 100 miles, whether walking or running, in the 31 days of the month to raise awareness and support for breast cancer education.

Alexis Howerin, a senior on the field hockey team at Wesley College was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer in early 2020 after finding a lump from self-examination. From January to April, Lex went through numerous doctors’ visits, mammograms and consultations, which led to a double mastectomy. At this time, Lex has undergone over five months of chemotherapy with more to come.

As part of the challenge, the Atlantic East encourages anyone participating or anyone who has a friend or family member participating to donate to any organization of their choice that supports breast cancer research."

>> We're In: The Atlantic East extended its challenge to other field hockey programs and conference to raise awareness and funds for breast cancer research and education. And the Commonwealth Coast Conference and its field hockey programs have stepped up and accepted the challenge.

>> What They're Saying: "Division III is one big family. In the DIII family, when one of us faces a challenge, we are there to pick up that family member and provide support in meeting that challenge. The same is true with the individual sport communities. The CCC field hockey coaches and student-athletes are a special group and I am happy that our staff can join their efforts in raising awareness and support for breast cancer education, a disease that has touched so many of us." - Gregg Kaye, CCC commissioner

>> What It's All About: "The Atlantic East's 100 mile challenge is close to my heart because of my mother and grandmother. Both have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Most recently my mom this January. She fought for the last nine months and is now successfully through all her treatments. She showed me amazing strength throughout the process and I am lucky to call her my mom." - Haylee Angster, UNE field hockey student


>> #LexStrong #Pledge100

 


 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full-time semester, and earn a 3.4 cumulative grade point average. Student-athletes who compete for a collegiate club team are also eligible if the club team is overseen by the athletics department at the local chapter.

Find out more at ChiAlphaSigma.com

 
4.  I Can Do Everything ... But Hear


A powerful video from Gallaudet University's Serenity Fry, as she shares her journey as a deaf student who follows her basketball passion.


 

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5.  Conference Call

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences as we go back in time to the 1960s.

Conference: Empire 8
Commissioner: Chuck Mitrano
Headquarters: Hilton, N.Y.
WebsiteEmpire8.com
  • Founded: 1964
  • Original name was Independent College Athletic Conference. Changed to Empire Athletic Association in 1991 and Empire 8 in 1999.
  • Core Members (9): Hartwick (1991), Elmira (1993), Nazareth (1993), Utica (1993), Alfred (1998), St. John Fisher (1998), Houghton (2012), Sage (2017), Keuka (2020)
  • Affiliates (5): Brockport (FB), Cortland (FB), Morrisville (FB), SUNY Oswego (MGOLF), Washington & Jefferson (FB)
     
  • Oldest: Hartwick (1797)
  • Largest: St. John Fisher (2,616)
  • Smallest: Elmira (746)
  • Longest Trip: 280 (Houghton to Sage)
  • Championship Sports: 23
     
>> Tomorrow: USA South Conference

sources: Google Maps, EADA

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 

 
7.  1 Underhanded Thing

 

Kazakhstan’s Alexander Bublik, the tennis player who says he hates tennis, was on the French Open’s center court Monday night when he did one of the few things he actually likes about this sport: he hit a shot so dumb it was brilliant.

Instead of walloping a traditional serve at more than 100 miles per hour, he dinked an underarm shot just over the net and into Gael Monfils’ court at about the speed of a paper plane. The move was completely legal. And it was so stunning that it was also an ace.

It wasn’t the first time Bublik had pulled the stunt, known here as a service a la cuillère—a “spoon serve.” It wasn’t even the first time he’d pulled it this month. After deploying the underarm shot to destructive effect in a tournament last week, it has become Bublik’s not-so-secret weapon. Now, with people catching on, the spoon serve could turn into Paris’s must-have accessory of the fall."

>> What They're Saying: Plenty of purists see the move as an insult to tennis, a sport of power, precision, and immaculate mechanics. When it comes to Bublik, ranked no. 49 in the world, they wouldn’t be entirely wrong. He did, after all, recently say this to the French sports daily L’Equipe: “I despise tennis with all of my heart. I only play it for the money.”

>> I'm Looking at You, Kid: I saw this article and thought of recent Division III committee chairs Jenn Dubow of the SCIAC and Patrick Summers of the NEWMAC. Now ... you would never do this, would you?

>> Continue Reading
 

 

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Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Can a Bubble Be Built?

 


PRESENTED BY CHI ALPHA SIGMA
"recognizing college student-athletes who excel both on and off the field of competition."


D3Playbook

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III
 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
 
>> Good Wednesday morning!  Did you watch the presidential debate last night? In a word, wow.

>> Today's Word Count: 1,275. 

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
1.  Can a Bubble Be Built?


by Brendan Kleen, Global Sport Matters


"As the NCAA crafts its championship events for the fall and spring semesters, it is looking to the pros for a roadmap. 

During this pandemic, that means putting together a strict, safe, virus-free “bubble,” flush with plentiful testing, strict adherence to public health guidelines -- and a huge investment. After NCAA schools lost an estimated $375 million combined due to the cancelation of the men’s basketball tournaments, there is already a sense of urgency among the association and its membership to find a plan that can be safe, cost-effective, and entertaining for college basketball next spring. Based on the available evidence, the best and perhaps only way to do that is to form a bubble for the tournament, which brings together dozens of student-athletes and staff members from (at least) 68 teams across the country.

But especially in a year that has seen an uptick in demonstrations among college athletes and more momentum in the courts toward compensating them, a full-fledged March Madness bubble has the potential to entirely fracture the line between amateurism and high-value performers.

“A bubble reveals the tension at the heart of big-time college sports,” says Dr. Victoria Jackson, a sports historian and clinical assistant professor of history at Arizona State University. “(The NCAA claims to) treat athletes just like all students in one situation, and then the very next minute are acting in ways that treat students who play sports very differently from other students.”

>> What's At Stake: "Should the NCAA move toward a bubble for any of its championships or major events this school year, safety will only cost money, but the efforts could cost the association its hold on amateurism."

>> The Big Picture: "Were a college bubble to form, the logistics would be similar to what goes on inside the NBA’s clean site at Walt Disney World, from regular testing to maintain a clean environment, plus universal masking, restricted entry and exit and monitored social distancing to ensure one case doesn’t become an outbreak. Testing, according to Dr. Zachary Binney, an epidemiologist and assistant professor of quantitative theory at Emory University, would not even have to be daily if programs were fully safe in a bubble."

>> The Bottom Line: "Another missed NCAA tournament paycheck would be dire for college athletics, but pulling it off could mean cracking an even bigger hole in amateurism. Because of that paradox, a bubble is likely to be a quite complicated solution to an admittedly massive problem for college sport."
 

>> Continue Reading
 


2.  NESCAC Votes

NESCAC institutions have partnered with the ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge for a NESCAC Votes initiative. The NESCAC Votes initiative seeks to inform and increase civic engagement and share non-partisan voter registration tools and resources in advance of Election Day on November 3. 

The NESCAC athletic directors have committed to designate November 3 as a day off from athletic activity to support students in their ability to vote on Election Day and to be involved in the democratic process.

As part of the NESCAC Votes initiative, each institution’s student-athlete advisory committee and student-athletes of color council will conduct a NESCAC Student-Athlete Voting Challenge.

The challenge is aimed at getting 100% eligible student-athlete voter turnout on every NESCAC campus. The competition will be measured by how many student-athletes Take the Pledge to vote. Each time a student-athlete pledges to vote, their participation will be included on a leaderboard that will display how many students at each institution have pledged to vote.

>> What They're Saying: “Part of the college experience is growing as a person and figuring out how citizens can impact their future. Exercising your right to vote is a way to be an active citizen and have an impact at the local, state, and national level. The decision by the NESCAC Athletic Directors to suspend athletic activities on Election Day demonstrates the importance they, and the conference as a whole, place on civic engagement by student-athletes," said Julia Martin, a senior on the Hamilton women's swimming & diving team and the NESCAC SAAC Chair.

>> Keep Reading

 

3.  Town Hall
 

The Middle Atlantic Conference (MAC) is proud to team up with the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) to provide a town hall for student-athletes, coaches, and administrators to discuss social and racial justice on college campuses.

The MAC and MIAC will host two Town Halls on Race and Social Justice on Tuesday, October 27. A morning session will be tailored towards administrators and coaches, and an evening session will be open for student-athletes. The two panel discussions will help break down what social justice looks like on campus and how we can help break down the barriers for not only student-athletes but aalso coaches and administrators.

The administrator and coach panel will be moderated by Niya Blair-Hackworth, Director of Inclusion at the NCAA. Panelists will include:

  • Chris Dixon, Director of Athletic Diversity & Inclusion at Augsburg University
  • Erika Moyer, Head Strength & Conditioning Coach and Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Representative at Hood College
  • Kelsey Koelzer, Head Women's Ice Hockey Coach at Arcadia University
  • Jason Verdugo, Associate Vice President and Athletic Director at Hamline University
The student-athlete panel will be moderated by Chris Dixon, Director of Athletic Diversity & Inclusion at Augsburg University. Panelists will include:
  • Erika Moyer, Head Strength & Conditioning Coach and Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Representative at Hood College
  • Kelsey Koelzer, Head Women's Ice Hockey Coach at Arcadia University
  • Talia Williams, Women's Volleyball Student-Athlete / MIAC National SAAC Representative at Carleton College

Both town hall sessions will provide participants the opportunity to discuss with the panelists and break down what is happening not only on their campus but also across both conferences. Contact your athletic department for registration information.

 

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 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full-time semester, and earn a 3.4 cumulative grade point average. Student-athletes who compete for a collegiate club team are also eligible if the club team is overseen by the athletics department at the local chapter.

Find out more at ChiAlphaSigma.com

 
4.  Star of the Day

Women's Golf, Kmiecik win Lady Crusader Fall Invitational
  • Mary Hardin-Baylor's Sarah Kmiecik pulled away from the field with a final-round 71 to take medalist honors at the Lady Cru Invitational. The freshman bettered her opening round score by two shots on the way to her first collegiate victory. The Cru won the team title by seven shots over East Texas Baptist.
  • Wartburg's Joe Freiburger and Loras' Kassie Rosenbum were named the USTFCCCA Division III athletes of the week.

 
5. Conference Call

 

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with those formed in the super 70s.


 
Conference: New England Small College Athletic Conference
Commissioner: Andrea Savage
Headquarters: Hadley, Mass.
WebsiteNESCAC.com
  • Founded: 1971
  • In 1899, Amherst, Wesleyan and Williams first began to compete together as the “Triangular League.” Now it’s known as the Little Three.
  • Remaining Charter Members (10): Amherst, Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, Hamilton, Middlebury, Trinity, Tufts, Wesleyan, Williams
  • Other Core Members (1): Connecticut College (1982)
     
  • Oldest: Williams (1793)
  • Largest: Tufts (5,448)
  • Smallest: Connecticut College (1,796)
  • Longest Trip: 446 miles (Colby to Hamilton)
  • Championship Sports: 27

>> Tomorrow: Empire 8


sources: Google Maps, EADA

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 
 
7.  1 Nostalgia Thing 
 


Sound familiar? "There’s a lot of disappointment happening in our days, so nobody wants tears at the table. Let’s treat ourselves to something we all will like," Esmee Williams, who looks at where home cooking is heading for Allrecipes.com, based in Seattle, tells the AP.

  • Boomer and Gen X nostalgia dishes like chicken Kiev, chicken à la king, cheese fondue and salmon patties have become more popular, she says.


 

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