Friday, September 25, 2020

Football Remains Undefeated


PRESENTED BY CHI ALPHA SIGMA
"recognizing college student-athletes who excel both on and off the field of competition."

D3Playbook

SEPTEMBER 25, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III


 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Friday Morning! Yom Kippur begins at sundown on Sunday and continues until sundown Monday. To those who celebrate, may you have an easy fast.

>> Today's Word Count: 965

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. We appreciate your kind words of support. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook

1.  Football Remains Undefeated
 

NCAA committee recommends waiving bowl eligibility requirements for 2020  college football season - CBSSports.com
by Pat Forde, Sports Illustrated

"Football is undefeated.

That is the lesson from our summer of angst, our fall of flip-flopping, our back-and-forth battle over whether to play this season amid a pandemic that is not over. Football will not be denied. Football will steamroll those who stand in its path. Football will win in a blowout, then point at the scoreboard.

It is an amazing societal phenomenon. In a nation that had to alter almost every facet of daily life, football was placed on the Must Preserve List. History will judge whether that choice, which might have been more of a primal urging, was the right one.

College football is where the tension lies, given its ties to higher education (classrooms closed, practices ongoing) and its morally squishy economics (so much money coming in, so little of it going to the athletes themselves). The inherent conflicts are glaring in the best of times, and even more so in the morass of 2020."

Now, nine of the 10 FBS conferences are playing with the 10th poised to announce its return today.

>> Why It Matters: "The NCAA medical advisory group listed the sport in its highest risk category during the summer, and chief medical officer Brian Hainline opined against playing. That was brushed aside. The NCAA had no jurisdiction over FBS football, so why listen?"

>> The Final Word: "One of the big reasons this is all working is that college football players have not become notably seriously ill. Let’s desperately hope that continues. If it doesn’t, and something goes wrong, this will be the undefeated sport’s pyrrhic victory."

>> Continue Reading
 


2. Fall Enrollment Dips

by Audrey Williams June, Chronicle of Higher Education

 

"How have college enrollments fared in the middle of a pandemic? A new report from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, released on Thursday, provides an early look, with data showing a 2.5-percent dip in undergraduate attendance this fall.

The preliminary data, which reflect enrollments as of September 10, reveal that undergraduate enrollments at all types of institutions have declined, compared with the same time last fall. Community colleges fared the worst, with a decline of 7.5 percent. The drop in undergraduate enrollment also played out across all demographic groups — and among international students in particular — and in some states more than others."

>> Situational Awareness: "The center’s enrollment results are based on 3.6 million students at 629 colleges, nearly 22 percent of the institutions that report to the organization. The data will be updated monthly throughout the fall as more colleges report their enrollments."



>> Continue Reading ($)

 

3.  Calendar
 

October 1 - New FAR Orientation Applications Open
October 6 - NCAA Return on Inclusion webinar with Nevin Caple
October 15 - Interpretations and Legislation Committee
October 15 - Membership Committee
October 19-20 - Management Council
October 27-28 - Presidents Council

 


 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full-time semester, and earn a 3.4 cumulative grade point average. Student-athletes who compete for a collegiate club team are also eligible if the club team is overseen by the athletics department at the local chapter.

Find out more at ChiAlphaSigma.com


 
4.  Conference Call

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with those formed in the Super 70s
 

Conference: Old Dominion Athletic Conference
Commissioner: Brad Bankston
Headquarters: Forest, Va.
WebsiteODAConline.com
  • Founded: May 18, 1975
  • Founded as Virginia College Conference
  • Remaining Charter Members (8): Bridgewater, Eastern Mennonite, Emory & Henry, Hampden-Sydney, Lynchburg, Randolph-Macon, Roanoke, Washington and Lee
  • Other Core Members (7): Hollins (1982), Randolph (1982), Sweet Briar (1982), Virginia Wesleyan (1989), Guilford (1991), Shenandoah (2012), Ferrum (2018)
  • Associates (2): Greensboro (WSWIM), Southern Virginia (FB)
     
  • Oldest: Washington and Lee (1749)
  • Largest: Shenandoah (1,966)
  • Smallest: Eastern Mennonite (848)
  • Longest Trip: 373 miles (Emory and Henry to Virginia Wesleyan)
  • Championship Sports: 24

>> Monday: Upper Midwest Athletic Conference


sources: Google Maps, EADA

 

5. Comings and Goings
 
 
6.  1 Naked Thing
 


Photo: Gene J. Puskar/AP

The naked ballot is the hanging chad of 2020.

In Pennsylvania, Democrats fear that the problem could cause 100,000+ votes to be invalidated.

"Naked ballots" are mail ballots that arrive without inner "secrecy envelopes," the Philly Inquirer explains.

  • "Pennsylvania uses a two-envelope mail ballot system: A completed ballot goes into a 'secrecy envelope' that has no identifying information, and then into a larger mailing envelope that the voter signs."

The context: The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled last week that ballots had to be rejected if not enclosed in the proper secrecy envelope — a victory for President Trump's campaign in the pivotal state. (AP)

- courtesy of Axios


 

Subscribe to d3Playbook
Know someone that would enjoy receiving d3Playbook?
Send an email to d3Playbook@gmail.com with "subscribe" in the subject line
Twitter
Facebook
Website
Copyright © 2020, D3Playbook.com All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
d3Playbook@gmail.com

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.


Thursday, September 24, 2020

A Hit for the Community

 


PRESENTED BY CHI ALPHA SIGMA
"recognizing college student-athletes who excel both on and off the field of competition."

D3Playbook

SEPTEMBER 24, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III


 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

 

>> Good Thursday Morning!  Did you know that it will be the 20th consecutive year without a repeat champion in MLB as the Washington Nationals have been eliminated? #Natitude

>> Today's Word Count: 1,309. Easy to read. Easy to digest. Get ready for the weekend.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook

1.  A Hit for the Community
 
UW Oshkosh Homecoming 2011 football game vs. UW-Whitewater. | Homecoming  games, Whitewater, Football games
by Ricardo Torres, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

"At UW-Oshkosh, when the winter season ended they needed to coordinate travel to get teams home.

“We were in the postseason when we got the notification,” said Oshkosh athletic director Darryl Sims. “We had programs out across the country getting ready to compete for national championships and we had to call them and tell them to come home.”

And bad news keeps coming for sports fans in the college towns across the state. 

On Sept. 18, the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference voted unanimously to suspend all winter sports through the end of 2020, which includes men’s and women’s basketball, women’s gymnastics, men’s and women’s ice hockey, men’s and women’s indoor track & field, men’s and women’s swimming and diving, and wrestling.

The coronavirus pandemic has canceled college sporting events since March. And while the attention has turned to Division I schools like the University of Wisconsin and Marquette University, Division II and III sports departments are absorbing the financial blow of a lack of sports that echo throughout the school and towns in which these universities reside."

>> Big Picture: “The bigger hit for not having football is basically a hit on the community,” UW-Whitewater athletic director Ryan Callahan said. “When we have a football game day, the people that make the most money are probably going to be the community and different campus services.” 

>> Behind the Scenes: "At Oshkosh, like other schools, coaches use camps and other activities to fundraise for their programs and pay for their operations budget. “Clearly they’ve had to scale way back on what they would normally do,” Sims said. “Just not being able to have those additional resources available is something of great concern.” 

>> Be Smart: If March Madness is postponed again ... “that’s going to be a huge hit for all divisions because that basically funds all of Division I, II and III championships," Callahan said."

>> Continue Reading 

 

2.  Bigger Than Sports
 

Saint Mary's athletic trainers

"A survey conducted by National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) found that while there may be robust COVID-19 preparedness and safety protocols in place at colleges and universities, athletic trainers are seeing concerning trends in regards to environment, supplies and adherence to policies at all levels of collegiate play. According to the survey of 1,232 collegiate athletic trainers across Division I, II, III, NAIA, and 2-year colleges, 34.76% of student athletes and less than half (46.8%) of coaches and staffers are fully following COVID-19 related safety protocols.

Findings

  • 34.76% of student athletes are fully compliant with university and sport COVID-19 related safety protocols. 58.52% follow somewhat and 6.72% do not follow at all.
  • Less than half of coaches and staffers (46.8%) are fully compliant with university and sports COVID-19 related safety protocols with 46.23% somewhat follow safety protocols and 6.96% do not follow at all.
  • 21.38% of collegiate athletic trainers do not have access to adequate personal protective equipment (PPE).
  • 13.12% of athletic trainers do not have access to adequate materials for proper sanitation.
  • 44.07% of athletic trainers feel that the environment that they are working in is safe. 46.34% of athletic trainers believe it is somewhat safe and 9.59% believe that it is not safe at all.

>> Quotable: “The compliance of student athletes and staff to COVID-19 safety protocols is not just a sports issue; it’s a public health issue. In many cases, each person is interwoven into a larger community of students, professors, and beyond, so the results are concerning,” said NATA President, Tory Lindley, MA, ATC. “It will take every member of the team – from student athletes to staff on the sidelines – to understand that noncompliance is not only a threat to the season but to mitigating the spread of COVID-19.”

>> Doing It Right: “COVID-19 has completely changed how we do our jobs this year,” said Saint Mary's (Minn.) head athletic trainer Jill Collum, who is in her eighth year as the Cardinals’ head athletic trainer. “I am used to seeing lots of athletes at one time, and now we require the athletes to sign up and schedule an appointment with us, so we don’t get to see the athletes in the training room like we are used to — and that is something we really enjoy. Without having practices everyday, and no competitions, it is just a different feel overall."


>> Read the entire NATA release

 
3.  Your Honor


Calvin University swept the USTFCCCA weekly Division III awards that were announced on Wednesday.
 


 


 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full-time semester, and earn a 3.4 cumulative grade point average. Student-athletes who compete for a collegiate club team are also eligible if the club team is overseen by the athletics department at the local chapter.

Find out more at ChiAlphaSigma.com

 
4.  Reaching Your Donors


What do you think of newsletters as a communications tool? Can they be helpful in reaching out to your alums, parents, students and other patrons of your program?

Let us know what you think.

We appreciate your support.

 

Subscribe to d3Playbook

5.  Conference Call

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with the first formed in the big 80s.
 
Centennial Conference Logo | evolution history and meaning, PNG

Conference: Centennial Conference
Commissioner: Portia Hoeg
Headquarters: Lancaster, Pa.
WebsiteCentennial.org
  • Founded: June 4, 1981
  • Established as Centennial Football Conference. Became all-sports conference in 1993.
  • Charter Football Members (8): Dickinson, Franklin & Marshall, Gettysburg, Johns Hopkins, McDaniel, Muhlenberg, Swarthmore, Ursinus
  • Other Core Members (3): Bryn Mawr (1993), Haverford (1993), Washington College (1993)
  • Associates (7): Cabrini (WGOLF), Juniata (FB), Marymount (WGOLF), Merchant Marine (WR), Moravian (FB), Susquehanna (FB), Washington and Lee (WR)
     
  • Oldest: Dickinson was founded as the Carlisle Grammar School in 1773 and became Dickinson College in 1783. Washington College was founded in 1782. You decide.
  • Largest: Johns Hopkins (5,553)
  • Smallest: Haverford (1,303)
  • Longest Trip: 142 miles (Dickinson to Washington College)
  • Championship Sports: 24
  • Editor's Note: Yours truly served as SID for the CFC for two seasons (1984-85) before departing for the Ivies, well before his 26-year stint as executive director (1993-2019).
     
>> Tomorrow: Old Dominion Athletic Conference

sources: Google Maps, EADA

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 

 
7.  1 Near Miss Thing

 


The path of asteroid 2020 SW. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP
 

An asteroid the size of a school bus is expected to zoom safely past Earth today, AP reports.

  • The newly discovered asteroid will come within 13,000 miles of Earth, well below many of the communications satellites orbiting the planet.

- courtesy of Axios

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook
Know someone that would enjoy receiving d3Playbook?
Send an email to d3Playbook@gmail.com with "subscribe" in the subject line
Twitter
Facebook
Website
Copyright © 2020, D3Playbook.com All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
d3Playbook@gmail.com

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

NCAA's Next Legal Challenge

 

1.  NCAA's Next Legal Challenge

College sports' legal battleground
by Scott M. Reid, Orange County Register


"The NCAA has filed a brief in support of the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee (USOPC) in a potential landmark California Supreme Court case, asking the court to rule that the USOPC does not have a legal duty to protect athletes from sexual abuse and harassment.

The NCAA acknowledges in the filing that a Supreme Court ruling that the USOPC has legal obligation to protect athletes could also create major ramifications for the NCAA as well.

“This Court should hold that the USOC did not owe a duty to Plaintiffs” to protect them from sexual abuse and harassment, NCAA attorneys write in the brief.

The State Supreme Court decision in January to hear an appeal of a 2nd District Court decision in October that found the USOPC did not have a legal responsibility to protect athletes came against the backdrop of a new state law that could see USOPC, and its 49 national governing bodies, as well as the NCAA, face dozens, if not hundreds, of sexual abuse lawsuits."

>> Situational Awareness: The NCAA filing is the latest chapter in a lawsuit filed by three former Olympic taekwondo hopefuls who allege they were sexually abused by coach Marc Gitelman over a seven-year period and that the abuse was enabled by the USOPC and USA Taekwondo, the sport’s national governing body.

>> What's Next: “If this Court were to find” that the USOPC can be held liable in such cases, NCAA attorneys write in the brief, “the NCAA and organizations like it would face the prospect of massive potential liability for conduct they can neither monitor nor control.”

>> Point: “It’s appalling that the NCAA not only maintains it has no legal obligation to protect student-athletes, but now it’s insisting that other organizations like the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee do not owe protection to athletes for sexual abuse and harassment either,” attorney Beth Fegan said of the NCAA filing with the State Supreme Court. 

>> Counterpoint: “The NCAA cannot exert day-to-day control over and monitor the thousands of coaches and student-athletes employed by and enrolled at its nearly 1,100 member institutions across the country or to ensure compliance with its guidance.”

>> Continue Reading
 


2.  Officiating Roundtable

Image

The Division III Commissioners Association continues to roll out its strategic analysis of the state of collegiate officiating with a video roundtable, led by Chuck Yrigoyen of the American Rivers Conference. Guests include:


 
3.  Golden Anniversary
 



Throughout the 2020-21 academic year, the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (WIAC) will celebrate 50 years of sponsoring women’s championships. The first women’s championships were conducted during the 1971-72 academic year in the sports of badminton, basketball, outdoor track & field, softball, swimming & diving, and volleyball.

The WIAC was originally formed in July, 1913 when an organizational meeting of the Wisconsin State University Athletic Conference, then to be known as the State Normal Conference was held in Madison. After the Wisconsin Women’s Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (WWIAC) was formed during the 1971-72 academic year, the Wisconsin State University Conference (WSUC) and WWIAC operated as separate men’s and women’s conferences for 26 years.

On July 1, 1997, the nine members of the WSUC and the WWIAC were joined together to form the WIAC. At 108 years old, it is the ninth-oldest conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

>> Go Deeper

 

Subscribe to d3Playbook

 
 
 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full-time semester, and earn a 3.4 cumulative grade point average. Student-athletes who compete for a collegiate club team are also eligible if the club team is overseen by the athletics department at the local chapter.

Find out more at ChiAlphaSigma.com

 
4.  Star of the Day
 
  • East Texas Baptist junior Hank Crain took individual honors at The Preview at the Hideout Golf Club in Brownwood, Texas. Crain fired a five-under-par 67 in the opening round and closed with a 70 to win by six shots over William Sammons of Mary Hardin-Baylor. The Hideout is the site of the 2021 American Southwest Conference championship tournament. Hardin-Simmons won the four-team event with a 586.

 
5. Conference Call

Statement from the North Coast Athletic Conference - Oberlin College  Athletics

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with those formed in the big 80s.
 
Conference: North Coast Athletic Conference
Commissioner: Keri Alexander Luchowski
Headquarters: Cleveland, OH
WebsiteNorthCoast.org
  • Founded: February, 1983
  • Remaining Charter Members (6): Allegheny, Denison, Kenyon, Oberlin, Ohio Wesleyan, Wooster
  • Other Core Members (4): Wittenberg (1988), Hiram (1998), Wabash (1998), DePauw (2011)
     
  • Oldest: Allegheny (1815)
  • Largest: Oberlin (2,758)
  • Smallest: Hiram (812)
  • Longest Trip: 455 miles (Allegheny to Wabash)
  • Championship Sports: 23

>> Tomorrow: Centennial Conference

>> PreviouslyAEC |  SAA | NECC | NACC | Landmark | NEAC 
NEWMAC | AMCC | NAC | ASC | GNAC | Liberty | CSAC | Skyline 
Capital | SLIAC | CUNYAC | HCAC | UAA | LEC | CCC | NCAC

sources: Google Maps, EADA

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 
 
7.  1 Remote Thing 

Illustration of a desk chair on a welcome mat.
by Erika Pandey, Axios | Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios


"We can officially declare the 9-to-5, five-days-a-week, in-office way of working dead. But offices themselves aren't dead. And neither are cities.

The big picture: Since the onset of pandemic-induced telework, companies have oscillated between can't-wait-to-go-back and work-from-home-forever. Now, it's becoming increasingly clear that the future of work will land somewhere in the middle — a remote/in-person hybrid.

Surveys conducted in the six months since most people started working from home show that less than 10% of Americans actually want to work remotely all the time, according to a new Barclays analysis.

  • The much more common desire is for flexibility: the option to come to the office a few days a week for meetings and face-to-face time with colleagues.
     
  • The U.S. workers who have already returned to the workplace are spending half a day less per week there, per Barclays."
>> Read More