Friday, September 11, 2020

Born to Be in Football

 


PRESENTED BY CHI ALPHA SIGMA
"recognizing college student-athletes who excel both on and off the field of competition."

D3Playbook

SEPTEMBER 11, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III


 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Friday Morning! 

>> 9/11 - Never Forget. 

>> Today's Word Count: 1,394

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. We appreciate your kind words of support. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1. Born to Be in Football

Alex Hanna
by Alex Hanna and Kristen Brill, The Unsealed


"To my players on the Oberlin football team,

I am probably your first female football coach. The idea of a woman running drills is new for a lot of people – not just you.

Recently, Coach (Ryan) Swingle, our running backs coach, and I went to a recruiting camp in Michigan. When we walked in, Coach Swingle started getting funny looks because he was with me. One coach came up to him, shook his hand and introduced himself. I was standing right there, but he didn’t look in my direction. It was like I didn’t exist.

So, I interjected and said, “Hey! I am Coach Hanna. It’s nice to meet you. What’s your name again?”

He reached out his hand and looked back over to Coach Swingle, as he said, “So what is she, your assistant or something?”

I knew I had Coach Swingle’s support, as I said, “I’m the director of football operations as well as the corners coach.”

When he realized I was serious, the coach chuckled, rolled his eyes and walked away.

I share this story with you because if I can get you to understand the significance of this moment, I know I can help you grow as football players and people."

>> The Back Story: "Growing up, my dad was a Browns fan. Neither my younger sister nor older sister seemed interested in watching games with him. So, I threw on an orange and brown shirt and sat beside him. Right away, I wanted to have a deeper understanding of the game."

>> Reality Check: "However, the realization that being a woman in football wasn’t going to be easy came in waves.  In the beginning, I was told that a good spot for me would be in a dress, helping out with recruiting, as opposed to being on the sideline calling plays. The next wave came with being assigned to assistant work, all the stuff that they didn’t want to do, but thought they could easily teach someone who never played."

>> Turning Point: "I coached at the high school level and with the Cleveland Browns youth programs before Coach (Steve) Opgenorth saw my love for the sport and hired me here at Oberlin. He believes in me. Coach (James) Mayden, our safeties coach, has helped me learn and develop an understanding of the secondaries."

>> What They're Saying: "She was born to be in football.  It will be inspiring to see her grow within the profession and help our student-athletes reach their full potential on and off the field." - Opgenorth

>> The Final Word: "How I dress doesn’t change why I am here, what I have to offer you or how I expect you to treat me."

>> Worth Your Time

 


2.  Soccer Taking Shape


by J.R. Eskilson, TopDrawerSoccer.com


"The schedule for college soccer for the spring is starting to take shape. This week, the coaches of Division I put forth recommendations for dates for the spring season to the Division I Board of Directors. The Board is schedule to vote to approve the dates on Sept. 16. 

Under the recommended dates, the start of practice for each program would be left up to the decision for each school. The first date for games would be February 3 and the regular season would conclude on April 24. 

The NCAA Tournament would start on April 30 and the Championship would be held between May 13-17."

>> Situational Awareness: These new dates come after the Division I Oversight Committee met last week and supported a reduction of 25% for playoff size for holding the championships in the spring. This would move men’s soccer tournament from 48 teams to 36 teams (with 24 automatic qualifiers and only 12 at large bids). The women’s soccer tournament would shrink from 64 teams to 48 teams (with 31 automatic qualifiers and only 17 at large bids). 

>> Between The Lines: "A source also told TopDrawerSoccer that there has been some discussion about including the results of the fall season into consideration for the spring. In effect, this could be a trial run for the two-semester model that college soccer has been pushing toward for the last decade. While those are in discussion, there has been no confirmation from NCAA on that front."

>> What's Next: The NCAA Board of Directors is scheduled to vote on the new bracket size and tournament dates on Friday, Sept. 11. 

>> Be Smart: Could this be the model that Division III eventually adopts?

>> Go Deeper


 

3.  Randy Tuggle 1958-2020
 

Randy Tuggle Memorial

"The Greensboro College community is mourning the loss of Head Women's Basketball Coach Randy Tuggle, who passed away Thursday following a courageous two-year battle with pancreatic cancer.

"Randy was a longtime friend and colleague, who inspired not only the young women he coached, but everyone in the Greensboro College community," said Pride Athletic Director Kim Strable.
 
With 198 victories, Tuggle became the winningest coach in program history. He led the Pride to the NCAA Sweet 16 in 2011 and was named USA South and D3Hoops.com Coach of the Year.  During his tenure, Tuggle helped mold Greensboro College's women's basketball team into a USA South Athletic Conference powerhouse where he helped the Pride to seven USA South Regular Season and five USA South Tournament Championships. In addition to his team's performance on the court, Tuggle is also credited with coaching and recruiting 17 All-Conference selections, two USA South Rookies and Players of the Year, and two All-Americans.

Tuggle, a lifelong native of the Triad area, graduated from Northwest Guilford High School before going to play college basketball at UNC-Greensboro where he played in the NCAA Tournament and served as a team captain his senior campaign. He joined the Pride community in 2002 to serve as the assistant women's basketball coach, alongside his cousin Jason Tuggle, before taking of the head spot in 2009-2010.
 
Randy is survived by his wife Susan, daughter Lauren Childrey (Ryan), grandchildren Ella and Kennedy, and son Jimmy Duck.

>> Complete Release

>> Editor's Note: Our condolences to the family, the team, and the Greensboro College community.

 


 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full-time semester, and earn a 3.4 cumulative grade point average. Student-athletes who compete for a collegiate club team are also eligible if the club team is overseen by the athletics department at the local chapter.

Find out more at ChiAlphaSigma.com


 
4.  Conference Call

Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with those formed in the Big 80s.
Men's Outdoor Track and Field - Skyline

Conference: Skyline Conference
Commissioner: Linda Bruno
Headquarters: New York, N.Y.
WebsiteSkylineConference.org
  • Founded: May 16, 1989
  • Charter Members (4): Manhattanville (1989), Merchant Marine (1989), Mount St. Vincent (1989), SUNY Old Westbury (1989)
  • Other Core Members (8): Mount St. Mary (1993), Maritime (1996), Yeshiva (1998), St. Joseph’s, LI (1999), Farmingdale (2003), Purchase (2007), Sarah Lawrence (2014), St. Joseph’s, Brooklyn (2015)
  • Associates (2): New Jersey City (MVB), Ramapo (MVB)
     
  • Oldest: Manhattanville (1841)
  • Largest: Farmingdale State (7,575)
  • Smallest: St. Joseph's, Brooklyn (823)
  • Longest Trip: 113 miles (Mount Saint Mary to St. Joseph's-L.I.)
  • Championship Sports: 19
  • Top Team Moment(s):  Farmingdale State advanced to both the men's basketball Elite Eight and the baseball World Series in 2009.

>> Monday: Capital Athletic Conference

Previously: AEC |  SAA | NECC | NACC | Landmark | NEAC | NEWMAC | 
AMCC | NAC | ASC | GNAC | Liberty | CSAC 

sources: Google Maps, EADA

 

5. Comings and Goings
 
 
6.  1 (or perhaps, Another) Bruce Thing
 

Nine newly written Springsteen songs are on the way, with an album expected in October, reports The Hollywood Reporter.

  • The 12-song album, recorded with the E Street Band over five days at Springsteen's home studio in New Jersey, includes "three new versions of previously unreleased tracks from the 1970s."
  • It "turned out to be one of the greatest recording experiences I’ve ever had," Springsteen said in a statement.

- courtesy of Axios

 
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Thursday, September 10, 2020

State of Collegiate Officiating

 


PRESENTED BY CHI ALPHA SIGMA
"recognizing college student-athletes who excel both on and off the field of competition."

D3Playbook

SEPTEMBER 10, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III


 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

 

>> Good Thursday Morning!  The NFL season begins tonight. But will it end in February or earlier?

>> Today's Word Count: 1,222. Easy to read. Easy to digest. Get ready for the weekend.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  State of Collegiate Officiating



The Division III Commissioners Association released an informative video talking about a strategic analysis on the State of Collegiate Officiating.

ODAC Associate Commissioner J.J. Nekoloff talked with NEWMAC Executive Director Patrick B. Summers, Chair of the Division III Commissioners Association's (DIIICA) committee that focused on this initiative. They provided an overview of the project and the steps outlined towards implementation.

The recommendations include a need for systemic and cultural changes when it comes to officiating. The committee is focused on three outcomes:
  • Organizational Leadership and Oversight
  • Strategic Alliances
  • Conference Engagement
The PICTOR Group and the subcommittee produced a 184-page report - with an executive summary - that will be provided to the entire DIIICA next week and released to the entire Association after that. The seven-person committee is working on a five-year strategic plan.

>> Watch the video
>> Read more on the project

 

2.  COVID-19 Advisory Group Expands
 

Introducing the NCAA Headquarters | Fan Fuel HQ


The NCAA has established a new COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group that brings together professionals from all three NCAA divisions and all five of the autonomy conferences in Division I.

This group of infectious disease, public health and medical experts includes some members from the original advisory panel, plus representatives from organizations and medical groups that have been working collaboratively with the advisory panel and NCAA schools. The Medical Advisory Group will tap further into the expertise on university campuses across the country and ensure close communication.

The purpose of the Medical Advisory Group includes:

  • Reviewing emerging COVID-19 research and data  
  • Specifically providing guidance regarding appropriate COVID-19 protocols applicable for winter and spring sports.
  • Providing guidance for conducting all sports competitions and championships
  • Providing guidance related to physiological, medical and mental health consequences of COVID-19.

The COVID-19 Medical Advisory Group is not a policymaking body but rather will provide guidance to the entire NCAA membership. The Medical Advisory Group, for example, will not make decisions regarding competition dates, end-of-season issues or the number of contests/weeks in regular season. Rather, the group will provide guidance so that appropriate membership and governance committees can make informed decisions regarding these matters. 

>> What's Next: The Medical Advisory Group will meet at least weekly and periodically produce public information. Additionally, the group will conduct biweekly videoconferences in which Hainline and other panel members will update representatives from each of the conferences and engage in question-and-answer discussions.

>> Keep Reading

 

3.  Hutcherson Following in Robinson's Path
 

Meet the Division III star who used a YouTube video and USB drives of his  games to land with a Big Ten team - CBSSports.com
by Joey Wagner, The Pantagraph


"There were times when Austin Hutcherson was in high school and then at Division III Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn. when the NCAA Tournament was nothing but a March tradition to watch from afar.

The Division I tournament as we know it, the money-making, television marathon doesn't have the same weight as the Division III Tournament for the general population. For Hutcherson, it was always something to pay attention to, but carried little affect in his day-to-day operations.

That, obviously, is likely to change. Hutcherson isn't at Wesleyan anymore. After playing with some professionals and Division I players over the course of a few summers, he elected to make the jump to Division I basketball. He landed at the University of Illinois as a 6-foot-6, 180-pound guard who can play three positions, shoot the cover off the ball and draws "Oohs and aahs" with his dunks in practice."

>> Situational Awareness: "After sitting out last year per NCAA transfer rules, he'll likely be a part of a deep and talented Illini backcourt. He can play anywhere from point guard to small forward, and perhaps a spell at the four position in a small-ball lineup."

>> The Key Stat: Two years after leading a Division III conference in scoring and taking a leap to Division I, Hutcherson is ready to contribute. But he's hardly an under-the-radar player, even without Division I production. He's been likened to former Michigan guard Duncan Robinson, who is a starter for the Miami Heat, which recently advanced to the NBA's Eastern Conference Finals. Robinson played at Division III Williams College before playing at Michigan. Robinson and Hutcherson are friends, Hutcherson said, and both grew up on the east coast."

>> What They're Saying:" I went DIII, had two amazing seasons and now I’m at the top of college basketball. I really can’t put it into words. It’s a crazy story and I feel really lucky and blessed to be here."

>> More on Hutcherson
>> Go Deeper

 

4.  Baseball Rules Committee Recap
 

2019 NCAA Division III baseball championship selections | NCAA.com
by Greg Johnson, NCAA
 

"The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel on Wednesday approved rules to clarify when pitchers are pitching out of a windup or set/stretch position.

NCAA Baseball Rules Committee members felt this interpretation needed to be made to help umpires, base runners and coaches discern when a pitcher is in a windup or set/stretch position due to the unique starting points on the mound that have entered the game in recent years.

The rule is effective for the 2020-21 academic year.

The panel also approved allowing any player who is removed for a concussion evaluation to return to the game if cleared by medical personnel. If the injured player is cleared to resume participation, he may resume his lineup spot only. A player may reenter the game only one time. 

The committee also discussed

  • Coaches' challenges
  • Designated Hitter
  • Visual Bat Inspections
  • Altercations and Penalties
  • Foreign Substances
  • Experimental Technology


>> Go Deeper

 


 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full-time semester, and earn a 3.4 cumulative grade point average. Student-athletes who compete for a collegiate club team are also eligible if the club team is overseen by the athletics department at the local chapter.

Find out more at ChiAlphaSigma.com

 
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5.  Conference Call


Today we continue our look at Division III conferences with a glance at those formed in the 1990s.
 
Colonial States Athletic Conference

Conference: Colonial States Athletic Conference
Commissioner: Adrienne Mullikin
Headquarters: Rosemont, Pa.
WebsiteCSACsports.com
  • Founded: February 3, 1992
  • Originally founded as the Pennsylvania Athletic Conference. Current name adopted in 2008
  • Charter Members (2): Cedar Crest, Rosemont
  • Other Core Members (9): Centenary (2007), Notre Dame (2007), Cairn (2008), Clarks Summit (2008), Keystone (2008), Bryn Athyn (2018), Wilson (2018), Saint Elizabeth (2019), Valley Forge (2020)
  • Associates (7): Alfred State (TRACK), Gallaudet (TRACK), Kean (MLAX), Lancaster Bible (FH), Montclair State (MLAX), Penn State Behrend (TRACK), Stockton (MLAX)
     
  • Oldest: Cedar Crest, Centenary (1867)
  • Largest: Centenary (1,055)
  • Smallest: Bryn Athyn (283)
  • Longest Trip: 213 miles (Keystone to Notre Dame)
  • Championship Sports: 17
  • Top Team Moment(s): Keystone finished second at the 2016 baseball championship, falling to Trinity (Texas)

>> Tomorrow: Skyline Conference

>> Previously
Atlantic East |  SAA | NECC | NACC | Landmark | NEAC | NEWMAC | AMCC | NAC | ASC | GNAC | Liberty 


sources: Google Maps, EADA

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 

 
7.  Hope Your Day is Like This



Photo: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP via Getty Images

French director, photographer and street artist JR jumps during a photocall for the film "Omelia Contadina" during the 77th Venice Film Festival.

- courtesy of Axios
 

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Wednesday, September 9, 2020

To The Summit

 


PRESENTED BY CHI ALPHA SIGMA
"recognizing college student-athletes who excel both on and off the field of competition."


D3Playbook

SEPTEMBER 9, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III
 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
 
>> Good Wednesday morning! 

>> Today's Word Count: 1,304. An easy morning 5-minute read.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
1.  To The Summit


Athletics Director Phil Esten
by Pat Borzi, MinnPost


"Now that it’s done, now that the NCAA has granted the University of St. Thomas unprecedented approval to go directly from Division III to Division I, a rumor persists that St. Thomas officials somehow orchestrated all 15 months of drama themselves.

No one will speak of this on the record, naturally, but here’s the gist of it: Some folks who follow Minnesota college athletics claim UST planned to go D1 long before the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) sought to kick them out. The Tommies cleverly manipulated their exit, the theory goes, to gain sympathy and remain in the NCAA’s good graces.

But the biggest piece of evidence countering the rumor: Going straight to D1 wasn’t even UST’s idea. It came from a guy known for big ideas, like buying a town in Texas and opening a pizzeria. 

Meet Tom Douple, commissioner of the Summit League, the one who made St. Thomas’ improbable move happen.

“Tom was the one to first step up and say, ‘We want St. Thomas to be part of our future,’” Tommies Athletics Director Phil Esten said. “We would not be here without Tom’s support and his guidance throughout the way.”

>> Situational Awareness: Douple didn’t know much about St. Thomas, but what he heard at (a) reception made him curious. So he fired up his laptop. Three big numbers about the school jumped out to him: 10,000-plus students, 110,000-plus alumni, and an endowment exceeding $500 million.  Division I numbers, without a doubt. 

>> Why It Matters: St. Thomas would give the league a presence in the largest metro market in the Upper Midwest, where 40,000 league alumni reside. Every league school except Denver and Oral Roberts could bus to UST’s St. Paul campus, with a major airport just five miles away. It made so much sense."

>> Between The Lines: "From the NCAA, Douple learned UST needed one of two things: An extenuating circumstances waiver or special legislation streamlining the traditional 12-year path through Division II. The latter, Douple said, would be “a tremendous heavy lift.” But he took it as a positive that the NCAA didn’t reject the notion of UST’s jump outright. What he didn’t know was just how heavy a lift it would be — or that competing legislation almost derailed the whole thing."

>> What They're Saying: “If you know much about St. Thomas, you would recognize they had outgrown a Division III shoe. I think Tom was exploring what they were ready for and interested in. That’s how things got started." - Dean Bresciani, president, North Dakota State

>> Continue Reading
 

 


2.  Be Careful What You Wish For


by Scott Jaschik, InsideHigherEd.com
 

"Some experts suggest that top colleges would admit more minority and low-income students if they stressed nontraditional factors in admissions, such as essays, interviews or extracurricular activities. The theory is that minority and low-income students have more chances with these criteria to show their worthiness to be accepted. Scores on standardized tests have been controversial for years, in large part because Black and Latinx students, on average, do not do as well as white and Asian students on the SAT or the ACT.

A new research paper suggests that that there is some -- but only some -- truth to these widely held beliefs. Increasing the emphasis on criteria other than grades in college preparatory courses and test scores on standardized tests "may do little to ameliorate -- and in some cases, may exacerbate -- existing enrollment inequities," the study found. But placing less emphasis on standardized tests worked and resulted in a more diverse pool of students being admitted.

The findings: "Most institutions across all groupings ranked applicants’ background characteristics -- racial minority, first-generation, and legacy status, and geography -- as either 'not considered' or 'considered,' with few ranking them as important. Again, private and the most selective institutions in our sample ranked background characteristics as more important on average than other institutional types."

>> The Big Picture: "Wealthy applicants, who are generally white, have private counselors to help with the essays and the interviews, and they are more likely than other applicants to have parents and teachers who can help them."

>> Quotable: "While this study shows that adding other factors in the process means schools don’t get more diverse, I wouldn’t throw the baby out with the bath water," he said. "In my experience, when admissions officers were told to specifically look for other qualities and characteristics that predict success, and not focus as much on test scores, they paused, and were much more intentional in giving students credit for other things." - Angel B. Pérez, CEO of the National Association for College Admission Counseling

>> The Final Word: "Do we throw away the entire system because of it? No. We constantly build on it and try to improve it."

>> Go Deeper

 

 

3.  A Sports Major?
 

Illustration of a chalkboard with equations, a volleyball and a softball
by Kendall Baker, Axios  |  Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios
 

"Creating a sports performance major wouldn't solve every problem in athletics," writes WashPost's Sally Jenkins, "but it would at least be a profoundly clarifying reordering."

  • "Players would be required to write and reflect and make more direct connections in their real, chosen course of study ... which would equip them to be more than just ephemeral competitors."
  • "Coaches would be faculty members required to teach to broader classrooms, which would sort out the cheaters and poseurs from those who truly know how to impart principles of organization, leadership and collaboration."
  • "Athletic departments would become answerable to an academic dean. ... Our commitment to nonrevenue sports and women's sports would be much clearer."

The big picture: This is the basis of renowned academic Drew Hyland's lecture titled, "The Sweatiest of the Liberal Arts: Athletics and Education."

  • Hyland says this reordered system would look similar to ancient Greece at its peak, "when holistic education, the development of a whole person, meant something," writes Jenkins.
  • "Athleticism, Hyland points out, is a Socratic exploration: Know thyself."

>> Continue Reading

 
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 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
Chi Alpha Sigma is the first national scholar-athlete society to honor those collegiate student-athletes who have excelled in both the classroom and in athletic competition. Chi Alpha Sigma recognizes college student-athletes who receive a varsity letter in their sport, achieve junior academic standing or higher after their fifth full-time semester, and earn a 3.4 cumulative grade point average. Student-athletes who compete for a collegiate club team are also eligible if the club team is overseen by the athletics department at the local chapter.

Find out more at ChiAlphaSigma.com

 
4.  Calendar

Sep 13-15 - Championships Committee with Sport Chairs
Sep 14-15 - Committee on Women's Athletics
Sep 14-15 - Minority Opportunities Interest Committee
Sep 17 - Membership Committee
Sep 21-22 - Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sport
Sep 22-23 - Interpretations and Legislation Committee


 
5. Conference Call


Today we continue our look at Division III conferences, going back to the 1990s.
 
Liberty League

Conference: Liberty League
Commissioner: Tracy King
Headquarters: Troy, N.Y.
WebsiteLibertyLeagueAthletics.com
  • Founded: 1995
  • Founded as Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association
  • Charter Members (7): Clarkson, Hobart and William Smith, Rensselaer, Rochester, St. Lawrence, Skidmore, Union
  • Other Members (4): Vassar (2000), Bard (2011), RIT (2011), Ithaca (2017)
  • Rochester holds dual membership with UAA
  • Associates (5): Buffalo State (FB), Mount Holyoke (WGOLF), NYU (WGOLF), St. John Fisher (ROW), Wellesley (WGOLF)
     
  • Oldest: Union (1795)
  • Largest: RIT (12,473)
  • Smallest: Bard (1,766)
  • Longest Trip: 273 miles (Bard to Rochester)
  • Championship Sports: 27
  • Top Team Moment: William Smith defeated SUNY Cortland to capture the 1997 NCAA Division III Field Hockey Championship, the first of seven national championships for Liberty League teams in the conference’s 25-year history.

>> Tomorrow: Colonial States Athletic Conference

>> PreviouslyAtlantic East SAA | NECC | NACC | Landmark | NEAC |  NEWMAC | AMCC | NAC | ASC | GNAC

sources: Google Maps, EADA

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 
 
7.  1 Design Thing 
 


 

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