Thursday, August 20, 2020

Colossal Challenges Await DIII

 

D3Playbook
AUGUST 20, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

>> Good Thursday Morning!  

>> Today's Word Count: 1,657. Easy to read. Easy to digest. Get ready for the weekend.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  Colossal Challenges Await DIII

2019 'Monon Memory' - Thrilling Late Touchdown Gives DePauw the ...
by Amanda Christovich, Front Office Sports


"Stevie Baker-Watson, the athletic director for the Division III department at DePauw University, sits at her kitchen island, wrestling with how COVID-19 could permanently alter the landscape of her department and university. 

Off in the distance, officials from the lucrative Division I Power 5 conferences struggle with how to keep their billion-dollar football machine running, as some conferences postpone seasons and others forge ahead. 

But for different reasons, the impact of COVID-19 on Division III departments like DePauw could be just as colossal — and Division III officials are scrambling to cope with the fallout.

Unlike Power 5 departments, Division III departments don’t stand to lose billions in TV, sponsorship or ticket revenue this fall. But they do face several challenges of their own, from revenue losses caused by decreased enrollment to the question of how to afford the sizable costs of COVID-19 precautions if and when athletics resume. They might be forced to significantly alter their entire universities’ business models as a result.

>> Just the Facts: "Division III comprises mostly small private schools scattered across the country, and includes 446 institutions, 44 conferences and close to 200,000 college athletes, according to NCAA data. The vast majority of Division III athletic departments spent the summer postponing and canceling their fall sports seasons, citing health concerns over COVID-19, while Division I departments spent June and July wavering."

>> The Big Picture: "In fact, universities as a whole “count on their coaches and the institution to recruit student athletes,” because they can drive 25% to 30% of the total enrollment, said Jeff Martinez, the athletic director at the University of Redlands."

>> Reality Check: "Many of the small, private colleges that house Division III athletic departments have faced financial woes before COVID-19 began, said Baker-Watson, because declining enrollment, and thus declining incoming cash flow, has put these higher education institutions in precarious situations."

>> The Key Stat: "Without sports, institutions may have to completely reshape their business models because so much of their enrollment depends on athletes who want to play. “If it’s not financially viable, they’re gonna pivot,” Baker-Watson said. “They may pivot to more graduate programs, or they may pivot to more online programs.”

>> Continue Reading
 


2.  Gragg Named NCAA Vice President

 

"President Mark Emmert has selected Dr. Derrick Gragg, an accomplished leader with more than two decades of experience in college athletics administration, as the NCAA’s new senior vice president for inclusion, education and community engagement.

Gragg, currently vice president and director of athletics at Tulsa, will serve as the Association’s chief diversity and inclusion officer and report to Emmert. He also will serve on the NCAA senior management team. Gragg will begin his new role with the NCAA on Oct. 5. 

As senior vice president, Gragg will have a dual focus on internal and external initiatives and programming. He will lead all internal inclusion operations and supervise national office staff in inclusion, education and community engagement. Externally, he will serve as a national office ambassador to member organizations to promote the NCAA core values of diversity and inclusion. 

Gragg will work to strengthen inclusive education and its reach to the membership and national office staff around policies and programming. He also will oversee the NCAA’s leadership development office, which has increased online programming for student-athletes in the areas of career instruction and social justice activism."

>> Continue Reading
 

3.  Titus Reflects on Career



photo courtesy of UMB

by Ed Forry, Dorchester Reporter

"Tuesday, June 30, 2020, was the day that Charlie Titus returned to his post at UMass Boston for the last time. Since 1973, he had served in a variety of roles on the Harbor campus, and on his retirement day he was the vice chancellor for the Division of Athletics, Recreation, Special Projects and Programs.

In a tribute, UMass Boston’s acting Chancellor Katherine Newman said,

“Charlie has been the face of UMass Boston athletics for nearly all of those years. Under his tutelage … the Beacons have become a force to be reckoned with in NCAA Division III. He built an athletics program that regularly fields teams that now dominate many of the sports in the Little East Conference, one of the top D-III conferences in the country. In recent years alone, UMass Boston has sent two baseball teams to the World Series, a men’s hockey team to the Frozen Four, and the women’s volleyball teams have more championship rings than the Patriots. In 2018, the Women’s Track team won the indoor and outdoor DIII National Championship. During Charlie’s tenure, the Beacons have claimed seven national titles."

>> Situational Awareness: "Charlie Titus’s career, indeed, much of his life, was spent here in Dorchester. Born in Roxbury, he lived for ten years with his family in the housing project at Columbia Point before returning to Roxbury. He attended the Dever School on Columbia Point and went to high school at Boston Tech, where he played varsity basketball. His skills on the court led to a scholarship to Saint Michael’s College in Winooski, Vermont, where he was a four-year varsity player."

>> Reality Check: Life in Winooski was a bit of a culture shock. "There were three Black students my freshman year. My roommate was one; he was the quarterback of the football team when I was on the basketball team. And then we had this guy who was from Nigeria, a junior when I got there; he was the star of the soccer team. And me. That was it."

>> Gut Check: "My basketball career became very real to me when we played UMass and I played against Dr. J (Julius Erving). Everything came into perspective about how could you get to the next level. He was absolutely amazing. You know, it was one thing to watch him play, it was another thing to be on the court with him. And so I felt like I had a great education and I felt like I was preparing to really take on the world."

>> Favorite Moment as AD: "Going to the Frozen Four with our hockey team about six years ago was an unbelievable experience. We ended up No. 2 in the nation, and we lost the national championship in overtime by a crazy goal. But getting to a first conference championship in basketball when my son was the point guard – and the most outstanding player in that tournament– is a special moment. You get a chance to coach your son, and he’s the most outstanding player. It was just unbelievable."

>> What They're Saying: "Part of leadership to me is learning about people and giving them the space to do what they do and facilitating their success. That’s what I believe. I didn’t want to be anybody’s boss."

>> Go Deeper
 

4.  Tennis Announces Changes


The Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) announced on Wednesday updates to its Division II, Division III, NAIA & Junior College fall tournament schedule. Certain ITA Small College Regional Championships will not be held this fall and the 2020 ITA Cup will feature NAIA competition only. Following recent conference & institutional announcements to suspend fall athletics, the ITA Office consulted the following Operating Committees for revisions to the upcoming season. 

  • 2020 ITA Regional Championships lacking a host or a sufficient number of participating teams will not be held this fall. All other regionals will proceed as planned.
  • Canceled Regionals include the Men’s and Women’s West, Northwest, Midwest, Central, Southeast, Northeast & New England. See the updated ITA Small College Regional Championships page HERE
  • ITA All-American status will not be automatically awarded to Regional Champions for Regionals that do compete in fall of 2020. The DIII ITA Operating Committee will continue to evaluate All-American criteria for the 2020-2021 season. 
  • The DIII portion of the 2020 ITA Cup will not be held this fall. 

 


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5.  Data Download
 

Fastest Growing Colleges 2008-18 - Division III

  1. Sage Colleges (699 to 2,633) - 276.7%
  2. Trine (1,451 to 4,320) - 197.7%
  3. Rowan (10,270 to 19,465) - 89.5%
  4. WPI (4,556 to 6,874) - 50.9%
  5. Clarkson (3,045 to 4,274) - 40.4%
  6. Widener (4,861 to 6,621) - 36.2%
  7. Johns Hopkins (19,758 to 26,152) - 32.4%
source: Chronicle of Higher Education

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 

 
7.  1 Fun Thing
 


Via Twitter

For the couch conventions, twin games courtesy of Heather Podesta, founder and CEO of Invariant, a government relations and public affairs firm.

  • "See you in 2024!" the firm says.


 

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Tuesday, August 18, 2020

Enduring Amid the Pandemic

 

D3Playbook
AUGUST 18, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Tuesday Morning. Sun on Apple iOS 13.3

>> Today's Word Count: 1,547. Brief, concise, smart. An easy read to start your day.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  Enduring Amid the Pandemic


by Stu Durando, St. Louis Post Dispatch


"In discussing the viability of playing fall sports, officials in the NCAA Division III St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference had to consider factors that differed from those of their D-I counterparts.

Some of the league’s nine members – and soon to be eight – struggle with enrollment, and sports are one way to boost or maintain numbers. The league was not going to sacrifice athlete safety but wanted to avoid a complete postponement.

The compromise was to move soccer and volleyball to the spring but hold competition for cross country, golf and tennis in the fall.

SLIAC commissioner Dick Kaiser works out of a one-man office, and the league employs one other person in assistant commissioner Brian Lovellette. These are not easy times for small conferences that operate largely off of member dues and have expenses that essentially include payroll and championship events."

>> Situational Awareness: "The SLIAC reduced dues by 25% for the 2020-21 academic year, cutting into what was $206,000 of revenue in 2018-19, according to tax documents. The (conference) receives its second-largest chunk of revenue from NCAA grants, which amount to about $68,000. Schools do not charge for regular-season games, and postseason tournaments provide little in the way of a financial boost."

>> Why It Matters: "The importance of athletics at these schools can’t be overlooked with about 40% of students participating in sports. Kaiser said the league isn’t concerned about making money. The goal is to maintain enough funding to run the conference’s championships."

>> What's Next: "The SLIAC lost a school this year when MacMurray College in Jacksonville, Ill., closed after 170 years. It will lose another next year because Iowa Wesleyan has opted to move from D-III to the NAIA."

>> Quotable: “I’ve been around a long time, but it can be very challenging because you are basically dealing with a number of bosses who are the presidents in the league,” Kaiser said. “But I’m fortunate we have an outstanding group of presidents who seem to be on the same page most of the time.”

>> Go Deeper

 

 
2.  Higher Ed's Moment of Truth


by Elizabeth Redden, InsideHigherEd.com
 

"As fall fast approaches, a steady stream of colleges have backed away from plans for an in-person semester in favor of a largely virtual one, citing the worsening course of the coronavirus pandemic. But many other colleges are pushing ahead with plans for in-person classes, and students have already started moving in at some colleges that have implemented mask mandates, installed Plexiglas barriers in communal bathrooms and classrooms, and placed hand-sanitizing stations throughout their campuses.

Observers are questioning how college leaders are balancing the health and safety of faculty, staff, students and members of surrounding communities with the financial and political pressures driving the push to reopen campuses. Are they striking the right balance?

Some don't think so."

>>  Quotable: “We’re not going to be able to prevent all the infections, but we’re going to see some outbreaks,” A. David Paltiel, professor of public health at Yale, said. “And when we do, the adverse consequences are not going to be borne by students. They’re going to be borne by other much more vulnerable members of the community -- the custodians and the staff and the people who work at the Starbucks just down the road from campus.”

>> Reality Check: "UNC Chapel Hill announced on Monday that it would move to remote instruction for undergraduates as of Wednesday after it reported 135 new COVID-19 cases -- 130 students and five employees -- in its first week of classes. The university had opened for in-person classes against the advice of the local county public health director, and despite vocal opposition from some faculty."

>> Between The Lines: "Despite their common concerns, colleges have taken sharply divergent paths for fall. Robert Kelchen, an associate professor of higher education at Seton Hall University, who has been tracking colleges' reopening plans, said, "The institutions that are still staying the course are mainly public universities in conservative states and private nonprofit colleges that are worried about their financial situation. And then there’s some other colleges that have just made such large investments in being in-person that they don’t want to turn back," he added.

>> Yes, But: "I don’t think colleges are going to be able to bring students back in person if they send them home," he added. "I think they have one shot to get the semester right."

>> A Timely Read

 

 
3.  The Iowa Derecho


Derecho Site

Derecho. /dāˈrāˌCHō/. noun

  1. a line of intense, widespread, and fast-moving windstorms and sometimes thunderstorms that moves across a great distance and is characterized by damaging winds.


We are late to the story here ... but last Monday's intense line of thunderstorms that rolled through half a dozen states and traversed over 700 miles caused much damage at a number of Iowa colleges, including Coe and Cornell. 

At Coe, 100 mph winds knocked down trees and left substantial damage across the Cedar Rapids campus. Power and internet service have not been restored to the entire campus and classes will not begin tomorrow.

In Mount Vernon, the storm put the start of the fall semester on hold at Cornell College as well. The college is waiting for utility crews to repair power, internet and phone service. More than 100 trees were damaged by the high winds and the sports center and facilities building suffered roof damage.

>> Quotable: “We appreciate the patience and understanding of our students and their families as we alter schedules so close to the beginning of the academic year,” said Cornell College President Jonathan Brand. “We look forward to welcoming our students back soon, but our primary concern right now is the safety of our community. This shift will ensure our facilities team will have time to make necessary repairs and bring our campus back online after the devastating storm.”

>> Our thoughts are certainly with those who were affected by the storm and best wishes for a quick recovery.

 

4. NCAA Statement on Basketball

by Dan Gavitt NCAA
 

"As we prepare for the 2020-21 college basketball season, we have exercised patience and discipline in monitoring the effects of COVID-19 and making decisions regarding the season. We have learned a great deal over the course of the summer, and with health and safety being our priority, we have developed and studied contingency plans for alternatives to the scheduled Nov. 10 start date.

In the coming weeks, the NCAA Division I Men’s and Women’s Basketball Oversight Committees will take the lead with me in a collaborative process of finalizing any recommendations for consideration by the NCAA Division I Council for the start of the college basketball season. By mid-September, we will provide direction about whether the season and practice start on time or a short-term delay is necessitated by the ongoing pandemic.

We recognize that we are living and operating in an uncertain time, and it is likely that mid-September will be just the first milestone for many important decisions pertaining to the regular season and the NCAA basketball championships. While circumstances may warrant flexibility resulting in a different and perhaps imperfect season, the ultimate goal is to safely provide student-athletes and teams with a great college basketball experience."

>> Be Smart: The NCAA has much more control over basketball and other sports than it has over Power Five football (none). This will be a moving target and a lot of ideas will be floated before a decision is made. Buckle up.


 


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5. Calendar


August 20: Interpretations and Legislation Committee
August 20: Membership Committee
August 27: Administrative Committee
September 3: Nominations Committee
September 13-15: Championships Committee
September 14-15: Committee on Women's Athletics
September 14-15: Minority Opportunities Interest Committee

 

6.  Comings and Goings
 
 
7.  100 Years Ago: The Right to Vote
 

The bulletin moved at 1 p.m. on Aug. 18, 1920, breaking the news that the 19th Amendment had been ratified, giving women the constitutional right to vote.

  • AP posted highlights of its century-old coverage, including the "Why it matters" of its day:
Ratification of the suffrage amendment to the Constitution ends a struggle which began in this country before the Colonies declared their independence. It will eventually enfranchise 25,000,000 women.

Keep reading, courtesy of Axios.

 

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Monday, August 17, 2020

We Have to Play the Tournament

 

D3Playbook
AUGUST 17, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Monday Morning Sun on Apple iOS 13.3 And welcome to the new week.

>> Today's Word Count: 1,311... Top off your coffee and settle in for a news-packed edition.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  We Have to Play The Tournament

Live Looks – Cleaning the Glass
by Dan Wolken, USA TODAY
 

"Very rarely has the NCAA been accused of being a forward-thinking, risk-taking organization that gets out ahead of problems. But give NCAA president Mark Emmert some credit this week for saying out loud what has been abundantly clear over the last few months through the slow collapse of the college football season.

If college sports are going to happen next spring — and particularly the NCAA basketball tournament — we need to start planning for bubbles.

“My staff has been working hard on it and talking to all 32 commissioners and there are ways to do this,” Emmert said during a 30-minute interview posted to the NCAA’s media platforms Thursday. “I’m completely confident we can figure this out.”

>> Situational Awareness: "Through the last several weeks, though, coaches and administrators across college basketball have been watching the dysfunction around football and saying the same thing to each other: We cannot let this happen to us."

>> Between The Lines: "imagine a scenario where, for example, the ACC brings all of its teams to Greensboro for the month of January with the same type of stringent testing and standard quarantining you’d need to ensure everyone involved is negative. Over three weeks, every team would play nine or 10 games. Then perhaps they’d go back to campus for a bit and come back or go to another site to finish the schedule. The same kind of thing could be replicated in smaller increments for non-conference, round robin type tournaments with five or six teams."

>> Of Note: "And then in the NCAA tournament, not just for basketball but for other leagues, Emmert said you could end up with everything being played at a single site rather than having players travel all over the country as they typically would for three straight weeks during March Madness."

>> What They're Saying: "As ESPN analyst and NCAA critic Jay Bilas tweeted: “We need to drop the amateur distinction. It’s pro. Bubbles are not only okay, they’re necessary.” 

>> Be Smart: If the NCAA cannot pull off the 2021 Division I men's basketball tournament, what does that mean for the rest of the association? Will the NCAA continue to exist?

>> A Good Read


 


2.  Everyone is Miserable


by Pat Forde, Sports Illustrated
 

"At the end of a seven-day span of unprecedented tumult in college athletic history, I circled back with a prominent industry source who offered (unsolicited) this whopper quote to me last Saturday: “I think by the end of the week the fall sports will be postponed in all conferences.”

He was right, with one nine-figure exception. All NCAA fall sports championships have been postponed except for FBS football, which lost four conferences but still has six others inhabiting an eroding Football Island.

A shortened fall season with almost no fans and no true national championship, in the midst of a pandemic with no vaccine? Yuck. An ersatz spring season that may or may not happen with a vaccine that may or may not happen and could negatively impact next season? Yuck.

“We don’t have good options,” that source said.

And thus, everyone in college sports is miserable right now."

>> Why It Matters: "Coaches are frustrated, bewildered, angry, concerned and caught in the middle. The players below them want answers and are getting few good ones—and more than a few of them are going public with their unhappiness."

>> Zoom Fatigue: "Campus and conference administrators are fried from the endless Zoom calls and other meetings to discuss every difficult aspect of college sports during a pandemic."

>> Reality Check: "Many people without an interest in college sports cannot believe anyone is trying to play right now—but many people on the inside very much want to play. There are a lot more important issues in the world—but if you’re watching revenues tank while trying to lead a $100 million operation, that’s a pretty big issue in your own world."

>> The Final Word: "“I mean, I feel like the Titanic. We have hit the iceberg and we are trying to make decisions on what time should we have the band play?" - Dr. Carlos del Rio, an associate dean at Emory University

>> Keep Reading


3. Titans of Division III

Legendary F&M men's basketball coach Glenn Robinson announces ...
by Benjamin Zacher, BustingBrackets.com

"If – and when – NCAA Basketball returns, there will be a changing of the guard among the coaching ranks.

That much is not true in Division I men’s basketball, where the typical blue blood programs and coaches still lead the way. Mike Krzyzewski is still bringing in one-and-dones at Duke, John Calipari is on his “lifetime” contract with Kentucky, and Bill Self continues to battle NCAA accusations and investigations at Kansas. The same cannot be said, however, for Division III.

It is easy and expected for most to toss Division II and III aside. Neither are headlined by the well-known blue bloods, nor do either receive much attention from mainstream sports outlets, whether it be in written form or on television. Legends have been made at the Division III level, however – former Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan won four national championships in the 90s with Wisconsin-Platteville, and San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich made his head coaching debut at Pomona-Pitzer, leading them to their first conference championship in 68 years back in 1986.

So, why bring up Division III at all when arguably two of its most famous alumni moved on decades ago? Here is why: since November of 2019, 10 coaches – all of whom have spent 20 or more years at their respective institutions – have retired. These are coaches who have built and cemented their legacies solely at the Div. III level, amassing a whopping 5,538 career victories and numerous national championships between them.

>> What's Next: "While this decidedly marks the end of an era in Div. III hoops, it also begins an exciting new era. Wooster and Carthage, for example, are two of the programs that have seemingly made obvious and great hires from within. Wooster promoted Doug Cline, an assistant for Moore for 24 years, and a 1,000-point scorer for the Fighting Scots. Carthage’s Steve Djurickovic takes over for his father after serving on the bench for the previous six seasons, which was preceded by a stellar playing career at Carthage."

>> Yes, But: So why does any of this matter? Again, it is stereotypical for people to ignore, and oftentimes ridicule, Division III athletics. But if these 10 coaches have proven anything in their 20-plus year service to college basketball, it is that legacies can be made and cemented at any level.

>> Continue Reading


 

4. Track and Field Rules Review

DIII Women's College Outdoor Track & Field - Home | NCAA.com
by Greg Johnson, NCAA

"The use of technology to view video during track and field competitions was approved by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel on Wednesday.

Under the new rule, which is effective for the 2020-21 academic year, coaches can use hand-held technology devices for reviewing video in field events and for timing in running events.

Competitors can view the video with their coaches provided they do so in a specific area designated by meet management. The area will have to be in a location that does not interfere with other ongoing competition.

If video is viewed outside the designated area, it will result in a warning, and a second violation will result in a disqualification for the coach and competitor."

Other Rule Changes:
  • Time schedule changes preventing student-athletes from fulfilling their obligation to compete in an event will not be considered a failure to participate.
  • The maximum size of 3,000-meter heats will increase to 20 competitors, up from 16.
  • Cross country teams that start at least five runners and have fewer than five runners finish the race will be assigned a team place. Teams that start with at least five runners declare their intent to finish as a team. Incomplete teams would be listed alphabetically in the last position of the official team results as “Did Not Finish.” Tiebreaking procedures for incomplete team finishes will not be applied.
  • Officials are required to be present for all indoor and outdoor field event warmups. Meet management will establish the warmup time. Previously, it was recommended that officials be present for all field event warmups.

>> The Complete News Release

 

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5.  Tweet of the Day


 
6.  Comings and Goings
 
 
7.  1 Smile to Go


So how was your weekend?



 

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