Thursday, August 6, 2020

Canceled

D3Playbook
AUGUST 6, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

>> Good Thursday Morning!  Seventy-five years ago today, the Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, resulting in 140,000 deaths. Eight days later, Japan surrendered, ending World War II.

>> Today's Word Count: 1,986. A big news day. Easy to read. Easy to digest. 

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1.  Canceled
 

Image

The Board of Governors directed each division to make a decision on its fall sport championships. It also agreed to require all members institutions to apply the resocialization principles to fall sports and set a 50% sponsorship threshold for a fall sport championship to be conducted.

“Looking at the health and safety challenges we face this fall during this unprecedented time, we had to make this tough decision to cancel championships for fall sports this academic year in the best interest of our student-athlete and member institutions,” said Tori Murden McClure, chair of the Presidents Council and president at Spalding. “Our Championships Committee reviewed the financial and logistical ramifications if Division III fall sports championships were conducted in the spring and found it was logistically untenable and financially prohibitive. Our Management Council reached the same conclusion.”

>> Worth Noting: The DII Presidents Council pulled the plug on fall championships as well.

 


2.  Board of Governors Recap


The NCAA Board of Governors directed schools and conferences to meet specific requirements if they are to conduct NCAA fall sports during the preseason, regular season and postseason. 

The board expressed serious concerns about the continuing high levels of COVID-19 infection in many parts of the nation. The board has determined that it will only support moving forward with fall championships and other postseason play if strict conditions are applied and adhered to.


The requirements include:

  • All fall sports activity (preseason, regular season and postseason) must follow the recently released return-to-sport guidelines from the NCAA Sport Science Institute for all athletic activity. As the guidelines change based on the ever-changing pandemic, schools must follow any future modifications.
  • The NCAA will establish a phone number and email to allow college athletes, parents or others to report alleged failures. The Association will notify school and conference administrators, who will be expected to take immediate action.
  • All member schools must adhere to federal, state and local guidelines related to COVID-19. Further, the conduct of NCAA championships must be in line with federal, state and local guidelines.
  • All student-athletes must be allowed to opt out of participation due to concerns about contracting COVID-19. If a college athlete chooses to opt out, that individual’s athletics scholarship commitment must be honored by the college or university.
  • Each division must determine no later than Aug. 14 the eligibility accommodations that must be made for student-athletes who opt out of participating this fall or for those whose seasons are canceled or cut short due to COVID-19. College athletes and their families must know what their eligibility status will be before beginning the fall season.
  • Member schools may not require student-athletes to waive their legal rights regarding COVID-19 as a condition of athletics participation. 
  • Member schools, in conjunction with existing insurance standards, must cover COVID-19 related medical expenses for student-athletes to prevent out-of-pocket expenses for college athletes and their families.
  • Any NCAA fall championship or other postseason contests must be conducted within enhanced safety protocols for student-athletes and essential athletics personnel. These safety enhancements will include regular testing, separation of college athletes and essential personnel from all other nonessential personnel, and physical distancing and masking policies during all aspects of noncompetition. 
  • NCAA championships may use reduced bracketing, a reduced number of competitors, predetermined sites and, where appropriate, single sites to limit exposure to COVID-19.
  • If 50 percent or more of eligible teams in a particular sport in a division cancel their fall season, there will be no fall NCAA championship in that sport in that division.
  • If fall sports championships are postponed in any division, a decision to conduct that championship at a later date will be based upon the scientific data available at that time regarding COVID-19, along with other considerations.

>> Quotable: "The first and most important consideration is whether sports can be conducted safely for college athletes,” said Michael V. Drake, chair of the board and University of California system president. “Each division must examine whether it has the resources available to take the required precautions given the spread of COVID-19.”

>> Quotable II: “Student-athletes should never feel pressured into playing their sport if they do not believe it is safe to do so. These policies ensure they can make thoughtful, informed decisions about playing this fall.” - NCAA President Mark Emmert

>> Be Smart: Divisions II and III made things easy for the NCAA, but the Football Bowl Subdivision (i.e. Power Five football) schools called the shots.
 
 
3.  NCAA Petitions Supreme Court re: Alston


Supreme Court Sports Betting Case Oral Argument Recap: Christie v ...
by Dan Murphy, ESPN

"The NCAA filed a petition Wednesday morning that asks the U.S. Supreme Court to press pause on allowing college athletes to receive an expanded number of education-related benefits.

In March 2019, a federal judge ruled that the NCAA's restrictions on what schools can provide to student-athletes violate antitrust laws. As part of that ruling, Judge Claudia Wilken ordered that schools should be allowed to provide an unlimited number of benefits to college athletes as long as those benefits are related to education. The NCAA appealed that decision in circuit court and lost earlier this year. Wednesday's filing indicates that the NCAA intends to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court as well.

This particular legal battle began in 2014 when former West Virginia running back Shawne Alston filed a lawsuit against the NCAA. Alston and his attorneys argued that NCAA rules that place any limit on compensation that schools could offer to athletes violated antitrust law."

>> What They're Saying: "I think they're trying to put off the inevitable," said Jeffrey Kessler, the lead plaintiffs' attorney in the case. "They keep losing and they keep trying to prevent athletes from getting these benefits. Sooner or later the athletes will get these benefits and the world will move forward. They need to accept that reality."

>> What's Next: "While the NCAA has yet to formally appeal to the Supreme Court in this case, Wednesday's filing is a request that the highest court in the nation stay Wilken's ruling, a move that would keep the current NCAA rules in place at least temporarily. If the Supreme Court denies the motion to stay, NCAA member schools will be allowed to start offering unlimited educational benefits to their athletes immediately."

>> The Bottom Line: "Wilken's decision -- if it is not changed on appeal -- will allow schools to spend an unlimited amount of money to provide their athletes with education-related items such as laptops, science equipment, instruments for music lessons and potentially some monetary rewards for good grades."


>> Continue Reading


 
4.  Tuition Free or Extra Benefit?


by Emma Whitford, InsideHigherEd.com


"Less than a month away from the start of the fall semester, colleges continue to announce tuition deals and discounts to ensure student retention, encourage degree completion and ward off deferrals.

This week, St. Norbert College and Pacific Lutheran University announced tuition-free semesters and yearlong programs for returning and newly admitted students.

St. Norbert, a small liberal arts college in De Pere, Wis., unveiled its Ninth-Semester-Free Promise program on Monday, which would pay tuition for eligible students to finish their degree in their ninth semester. Eligible students must have completed eight semesters of undergraduate education, at St. Norbert or elsewhere, and must be enrolled in and successfully complete at least 12 credits each semester during the 2020-21 academic year.

Pacific Lutheran is offering students an additional tuition-free year on campus through its PLUS Year program, debuted Monday. All returning and incoming students regardless of class year will be eligible to tack on a fifth tuition-free year after their projected graduation date.

The goal of the program, according to Pacific Lutheran president Allan Belton, is to ensure that all students get four years of quality liberal arts, on-campus experiences.

>> Situational Awareness: St. Norbert president Brian Bruess hopes the program will appeal to students who may wish to have more uninterrupted time on campus for theater, athletics or study abroad opportunities. He also thinks it could ease the concerns of students who are unable to take a full course load during the 2020-21 academic year, for health, financial or other reasons.

>> Quotable: “When you think about the vast majority of the students who are going to take advantage of this opportunity, they wouldn’t have been here during that fifth year anyway, so it's effectively not really costing the university revenue,” Belton said."

>> Between The Lines: Since the tuition benefit is not available to all students ... would this run afoul of NCAA regulations regarding extra benefits? 

>> Yes, But: Although we applaud the schools for their thinking, we have a feeling that the Interpretations and Legislation Committee may be called in for its opinion.

>> Read More


 


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5.  A Golden Volleyball Season, Down to Four


With all the difficult news coming out about the fall 2020 season, we thought it might be time to dust off some anniversary seasons from the past. First, we reviewed the 1995 men's soccer championship. Today, we'll continue with a look back 25 years ago to the 1995 NCAA women's volleyball championship tournament.

Each edition of D3Playbook, we'll bring you the results of a round of play, culminating on August 11 with the final. Now, we know you can look this up online if you choose ... but maybe you'll just want to follow along.

National Quarterfinals
#2 Washington U. d. #1 Juniata, 15-8, 7-15, 15-13, 15-2
#3 Ithaca d. #13 Springfield, 12-15, 7-15, 15-7, 15-8, 15-11
#5 Cal Lutheran d. John Carroll, 11-15, 15-8, 15-4, 15-11
#9 UW-Whitewater d. #7 St. Olaf, 15-9, 5-15, 15-3, 15-6

>> Headlines: In a 1 vs. 2 matchup, it was No. 2 who came out on top as #2 Washington U. downed top-ranked Juniata in four sets. The Bears meet #3 Ithaca in the semifinal after the Bombers rallied from an 0-2 deficit to down Springfield. #5 Cal Lutheran ended John Carroll's magical run in four sets, while #9 UW-Whitewater dispatched #7 St. Olaf in four.

>> Monday: The final four from 25 years ago.

 

6.  Comings and Goings
 

 
7.  1 Burger Thing


"When you think of a food that's all-American, the first thing that comes to mind is likely the burger. The simple sandwich of (typically) ground beef on a bun allows for considerable creativity. To celebrate this classic, we’ve tracked down the absolute best restaurant for burgers in every state as well as Washington, D.C."

Have a great weekend. 

- courtesy of The Daily Meal
 

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Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Can The NCAA Survive?

D3Playbook
AUGUST 4, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Tuesday Morning. Sun on Apple iOS 13.3

>> Today's Word Count: 1,396. Brief, concise, smart. An easy read to start your day.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  Can the NCAA Survive?

NCAA committee to vote on extra year of eligibility for winter and ...
by Pat Forde, Sports Illustrated


"The NCAA has been vigorously criticized from the outside forever. It’s a fat, slow-moving target, easily harpooned by those who find college athletics to be poorly governed at best and immoral at worst. If you have no stake in the NCAA, you probably hate the NCAA.

But now the threats are internal, too. The calls are coming from inside the house.

From the players to the conference power brokers, people who are part of the NCAA structure are assaulting the controlling interests of college athletics like never before. On a dizzying weekend, three major stories broke that illustrate existential threats to the NCAA as we know it.

For decades, people have theorized and even fantasized about the Power 5 (the Atlantic Coast Conference, the Big 12, the Big Ten, the Pacific-12 and the Southeastern) breaking off and leaving the rest of Division I behind. This is a sign of increased intent to consider a secession of sorts.

Taken individually, each story is startling news. Taken collectively, it is a flurry of body blows that signal a critical inflection point for college sports. Is a controversial collegiate system buckling beneath its own weight? Can eternally embattled NCAA president Mark Emmert survive this? Should either Emmert or the institution itself survive?"

>> Notable: Forde writes that Division II and III presidents on the Board of Governors support Emmert more than the Division I powers. Representing DIII are Tori Murden McClure, president of Spalding, Fayneese Miller, president of Hamline, and Heather Benning, commissioner of the Midwest Conference.

>> What 2 Watch 4: Tomorrow's BOG agenda features a discussion of NCAA fall sports championships, a review of the FY 2020-21 budget and an update on the 2021 NCAA Convention slated for January 13-16 in Washington, DC.

>> Prediction: Look for the BOG to cancel fall championships in Divisions II and III. That's low-hanging fruit. Now if it adds DI championships to the list ... watch for fireworks.
 

 
2.  One is the Loneliest Number
 

After yesterday's decision by the Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference, Division III has just one league going forward with athletic competition in the fall - the American Rivers Conference.
 

  • “We’re excited,” Steve Cook, director of athletics at Coe, told Jeff Johnson of the Cedar Rapids Gazette. “Sure, we’re cautiously excited. Things are changing rapidly, but I don’t see a lot changing in the communications we have had within our conference. Look, the nation is changing, the state of Iowa is changing, there are a lot of dynamics at play here. But, ultimately, right now our conference has come to a solid foundation and agreement. And it’s based on limiting our schedules in a way we felt we could give it a chance, be safe, and with the best interests of our student-athletes in mind."

But the decision-making has also taken a toll.

  • “My fellow AD colleagues have been my support system, to be honest, with this,” Luther College AD Renae Hartl told Johnson. “Because there are not many people who are doing what we’re trying to do every day and feeling like we’re constantly trying to come up with a plan and changing the plan the next day. I would say one of the hardest things is not necessarily just athletics, but the people we are surrounded by, not just the coaches and the other administrators ... It is very difficult to have very little control about what is going to happen the next day. To satisfy all of the questions from not only our coaches but our student-athletes has been very difficult. They just want to know, and it’s so hard to say something and have to take it back. To tell a 17, 18, 19-year-old to be flexible as we navigate through this has been very hard.”

>> Continue Reading
 

 

3. New Day in the Heartland


Heartland Primary Logo

"The Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference (HCAC) unveiled a bold, revitalized visual identity on Monday. The comprehensive redesign includes distinct primary and secondary logos, a complete suite of sport-specific and championship marks, and an exclusive custom font.

The HCAC partnered with Skye Design Studios (SDS - www.sdsbranding.com) – a national leader in sport branding – for the project. The HCAC and SDS engaged partners from all 10 member campuses throughout the rebranding initiative.

>> What They're Saying: "We always viewed this project as much more than just a primary logo redesign,” said HCAC Commissioner Jay Jones. “This effort was about developing a full brand overhaul and changing the look and feel of everything we do as a conference."

 

4. A Golden Volleyball Season
 


With all the difficult news coming out about the fall 2020 season, we thought it might be time to dust off some anniversary seasons from the past. First, we reviewed the 1995 men's soccer championship. Today, we'll continue with a look back 25 years ago to the 1995 NCAA women's volleyball championship tournament.

Each edition of D3Playbook, we'll bring you the results of a round of play, culminating on August 11 with the final. Now, we know you can look this up online if you choose ... but maybe you'll just want to follow along.

Regional Finals
#1 Juniata d. Gettysburg, 15-11, 15-8, 15-8
#2 Washington U. d. Trinity, Texas, 15-11, 15-10, 15-9

#13 Springfield d. Coast Guard, 15-6, 11-15, 15-10, 15-8
#3 Ithaca d. #15 Rochester, 15-5, 15-9, 15-6

#5 Cal Lutheran d. #6 UC San Diego, 15-9, 15-11, 15-6
John Carroll d. #10 Ohio Northern, 17-15, 13-15, 4-15, 17-15, 15-13

#7 St. Olaf d. #11 Dubuque, 15-7, 15-6, 13-15, 12-15, 18-16
#9 UW-Whitewater d. #8 UW-Oshkosh, 15-11, 11-15, 15-12, 15-11

>> Headlines: Washington U. is the four-time defending national champion. For the second straight day, John Carroll overcame a 2-1 deficit to advance, winning the final two sets, 17-15 and 15-13. Dubuque nearly battled back from 2-0 before succumbing to St. Olaf, 18-16, in the deciding set. Six of top 10 teams in the final AVCA rankings are in the Elite Eight. #1 Juniata and #2 Washington U. meet in the quarterfinals.

>> Thursday: Eight become four.
 


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5.  Athletes Using Their Power


Now more than ever, student-athletes use their platforms to speak out about the injustices in our country. As they strive for a more inclusive world, they are looking to their institutions’ athletic departments and communities to evaluate their polices, identify change opportunities and be leaders in fighting against injustices.

The NCAA's mission in leadership development is to educate and empower student-athletes, coaches, and athletics administrators through transformative experiences that develop effective leaders, cultivate an inclusive community and enhance the college sports landscape.

In alignment with this mission, NCAA leadership development has created a four-part virtual series that will educate student-athletes on the power they have and how they can use it to effectively enact meaningful change. Weekly sessions will be engaging and center on action, preparing student-athletes to be effective change leaders on campus and within their communities.  

This virtual program is accessible only to student-athletes. Only student-athletes will be eligible to register to attend the program meetings and we ask that no coaches or administrators are present with student-athletes when they tune in to A4. There is a plan to hold a similar program for administrators and coaches in the coming months, but we ask that the August series remains solely student-athlete participants.

>> Learn More

 

    6.  Comings and Goings
     
     
    7.  1 Golf Thing
     


     

    Haven't we all thought about doing this ... at least once?

     

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    Monday, August 3, 2020

    Anatomy of the Decision

    D3Playbook
    AUGUST 3, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
    your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

    Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
     
    >> Good Monday Morning Sun on Apple iOS 13.3  

    >> Editor's Note: D3Playbook remains on its summer schedule, now publishing three times per week on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday (since you're not in the office on Fridays, wink). We will also bring any breaking news when it happens.

    >> Today's Word Count: 1,860... Top off your coffee and settle in for a news-packed edition.

    >> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

     
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    1.  Anatomy of The Decision

    2018 Season Preview: The Southern Athletic Association - Division ...

    What went into the decision to suspend, postpone and/or cancel competition for the fall semester? Who started the talks? Who was involved? How was the decision reached?

    D3Playbook spoke with Jay Gardiner, commissioner of the Southern Athletic Association (SAA), about the league's decision to suspend all athletic competition through the 2020 fall season.

    When did the SAA begin talking about the fall semester?
    The SAA AD’s Council and Presidents' Council began to discuss return to play during our spring/summer meetings. (May and June). At that time, the COVID-19 pandemic was beginning to lessen in most areas of the country. We stressed our desire to return to play, but recognized the necessity to put the health and safety of our student-athletes over our desire to compete. A statement was crafted in June by our conference that we had an intent to play in the fall. Obviously, that “intent” to play has subsequently been rescinded to a suspension of all fall conference play.

    Who initiated the conversation?
    We were all discussing the pandemic on almost every call. I think the agenda, regarding other conference business, was overrun with COVID-19 topics. We are a Presidentially-managed conference, so the lead on this came from their leadership.

    When did the presidents become involved?
    Our Presidents have been involved from the beginning. Our office, along with our AD’s Council have provided numerous options and plans directly to our Presidents. They have used these as guides, but their Council has made the tough, and in my mind, correct decisions regarding our fall plans.

    Did the SAAC have input?
    Our SAAC leadership hasn’t met since our decision to suspend play last spring. We certainly hope to get their input during the fall.

    Did actions of other conferences around the country have any impact on the SAA decision?
    We watched what others might be considering, but the decision was made solely on what we felt was best for our conference. Considering our geography and the travel requirements, we felt that there was no way we could play while protecting our athletes sufficiently and maintaining the protective bubble of our campuses.

    Was the decision unanimous?
    Though there have been a variety of opinions both at the AD level and the Presidents level, I’d say that once all the facts were in, the vote to suspend was unanimous. 

    How many schedules did the office create as alternatives?
    When considering the fall, we looked at a schedule that ended early, we looked at another one that had us start late...Oct. 1. The NCAA’s three phase recommendation made it tough to start and finish early, so we ultimately decided to play an SAA only schedule. As time went on, and the virus spiked in the South, we decided to suspend. We are presently working on various potential scheduling models for the winter/spring. We also discussed an option that would only play SAA opponents that didn’t require an overnight stay. Kind of an East/West divisional setup, but ultimately with our geographic footprint, it just wouldn’t work.

    Are there plans to discuss the spring semester on the horizon?
    It is a step-by-step promise, but we are discussing the winter and spring plans now that we have finalized the fall suspension plan. Our hope is that as the medical world miraculously creates new and better testing and drugs/vaccines quickly, we will have a much safer atmosphere in January and we can creatively provide play for all of our student-athletes at that time. 

     

    2. Power Struggle
     
     
    NCAA rules to give eligibility relief for student-athletes in ...

    Not since Georgia and Oklahoma sued the NCAA in 1984 over football television rights have the Power 5 conference members and the national office been so far apart.

    Sports Illustrated is reporting that the P5 conferences are floating the idea of conducting their own national championships, should the NCAA Board of Governors pull the plug on fall championship competition later this week.

    The Washington Post published a story in which the contents of a call between more than a dozen Southeastern Conference football players and conference officials were recorded and leaked to the newspaper. Contents that included the league’s health experts acknowledged they were unsure of the long-term ramifications of contracting COVID-19, that the league acknowledged it expected positive cases on every team in the SEC and that the greatest threat to their season would be posed by regular students not acting responsibly and contributing to outbreaks on campus. 
     

      >> Reality Check: Although the P5 has the money to fund national championship events, it has not shown any prior interest in doing so. And that has been discussed for years by DIII folks as a reason why the P5 hasn't already split from the NCAA.

      >> Be Smart: "By cancelling those other fall championships, the Board of Governors knows it would be painting the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) schools into a corner. The optics would not be good if the championships in eight sports were canceled amid the COVID-19 pandemic yet big-time college football played on," says Dennis Dodds of CBSSports.com

      >> Of Note: "Instead of being treated as crucial partners in an entertainment enterprise, they are being asked to function as essential workers so that schools who have spent lavishly and irresponsibly for years on facilities and coaching salaries can minimize the difficult decisions they’re going to have to make and TV networks can recoup some of the money they’ve lost without live sports to show for much of this year." - Dan Wolken, USA TODAY

      >> The Final Word: This has become a high-stakes game of poker that could impact Division III, should the P5 be serious ... and play the trump card.

       

      3.  #WeAreUnited

      Image
       

      On Sunday, athletes from the Pac-12 conference formed a group to negotiate with the conference and league ahead of fall sports starting, with specific demands in regards to the upcoming football season for "fair treatment for college athletes." 

      • "We are being asked to play college sports in a pandemic in a system without enforced health and safety standards, and without transparency about COVID cases on our teams, the risks to ourselves, our families, and our communities," the missive reads. "We will opt-out of Pac-12 fall camp and game participation unless the following demands are guaranteed in writing by our conference to protect and benefit both scholarship athletes and walk-ons."  

      The demands include

      1. Health & Safety Protections

      • COVID-19 Protections
      • Mandatory Safety Standards
      2. Preserve All Existing Sports by Eliminating Excessive Expenditures
      3. End Racial Injustice in College Sports and Society
      4. Economic Freedom and Equity
      • Guaranteed Medical Expense Coverage
      • Name, Image and Likeness Rights & Representation
      • Fair Market Pay, Rights & Freedoms

      >> Why It Matters: "Because the NCAA has failed us and we are prepared to ensure that our conference treats us fairly whether or not it continues its NCAA membership, #WeAreUnited."



      >> What's Next: Could be a game of chicken? Could be a game-changer? Time will tell, but things are changing fast in collegiate sports.
       

       

      4. And Then There Were Two


      Since we last met ... three other conferences made announcements about their fall 2020 seasons.Now the attention turns to individual colleges. While the Landmark postponed regular-season contests and championships, Catholic University announced that it will not participate in any sport through Dec. 31, 2020. And Franklin & Marshall of the Centennial Conference cancelled all athletic competitions before Jan. 1, 2021. 

      The Empire 8 Conference announced that its Presidents Council will make a decision regarding winter competition in basketball, swimming and diving and indoor track and field by October 1.

      >> Reality Check: Division III is not done making hard decisions.


       

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      5.  A Golden Season, Volleyball

      With all the difficult news coming out about the fall 2020 season, we thought it might be time to dust off some anniversary seasons from the past. First, we reviewed the 1995 men's soccer championship. Today, we'll continue with a look back 25 years ago to the 1995 NCAA women's volleyball championship tournament.

      Each edition of D3Playbook, we'll bring you the results of a round of play, culminating on August 11 with the final. Now, we know you can look this up online if you choose ... but maybe you'll just want to follow along.

      Opening Round
      #1 Juniata d. DeSales, 15-6, 15-2, 16-14
      Gettysburg d. Kean, 15-8, 15-13, 8-15, 15-6

      Trinity, Texas d. #14 Thomas More, 15-12, 11-15, 15-10, 15-8
      #2 Washington U. d. Southwestern, 15-2, 15-6, 15-5

      #13 Springfield d. Williams, 15-7, 15-4, 15-10
      Coast Guard d. Eastern Connecticut State, 15-12, 11-15, 15-2, 15-13

      #15 Rochester d. SUNY Cortland, 17-15, 6-15, 15-7, 15-7
      #3 Ithaca d. Binghamton, 15-5, 16-14, 15-9

      #5 Cal Lutheran d. Chapman, 15-8, 15-7, 13-15, 15-7
      #6 UC San Diego d. Occidental, 15-9, 15-11, 15-6

      #10 Ohio Northern d. Calvin, 15-10, 12-15, 6-15, 15-9, 15-9
      John Carroll d. #4 Kalamazoo, 15-7, 8-15, 13-15, 15-7, 15-7

      #11 Dubuque d. Concordia-Moorhead, 15-9, 15-9, 10-15, 15-8
      #7 St. Olaf d. Central, 15-7, 13-15, 15-12, 15-8

      #8 UW-Oshkosh d. #12 UW-River Falls, 15-8, 15-9, 5-15, 13-15, 15-11
      #9 UW-Whitewater d. Millikin, 15-7, 10-15, 15-3, 15-4

      >> Headlines: Washington U. is the four-time defending national champion. Both Ohio Northern and John Carroll battled from a 1-2 deficits to win their first round matches.

      >> Tomorrow: The regional finals.

       
      6.  Comings and Goings
       
       
      7.  1 Bubbly Thing



      Champagne bottles piled in the cave of the Vranken-Pommery Monopole in Reims, France. Photo: Francois Mori/AP


      People aren't partying amid the coronavirus pandemic, and it's hammering the champagne industry, AP's Thomas Adamson writes.

      • Producers in France say they’ve lost an estimated 1.7 billion euros ($2 billion) in sales this year — worse than during the Great Depression.
      • They expect about 100 million bottles to be languishing unsold in their cellars by the end of 2020.

      One producer called it "an insult to nature" that the Champagne region's famous grapes might be destined to produce alcohol for hand sanitizer, as has happened in other wine-making areas around France.


      - courtesy of Axios

       

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