Friday, May 15, 2020

What Happens If a Player Tests Positive?

D3Playbook
MAY 15, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
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1. What Happens If a Player Tests Positive?

Clemens Stadium - Saint John's University Athletics
by John Taity, AL.com

"The billion-dollar question facing college football is what happens when a player tests positive for coronavirus.

It’s a question of when, not if it happens, according to infectious disease experts, yet no one seems to know exactly what will happen when it does.

Will one player getting COVID-19 shut down the entire sport the way Rudy Gobert did to the NBA in mid-March? Can an athlete quarantine for two weeks and everything else go on as planned as it essentially did during a recent UFC show? There are so many questions and so many possible ramifications of a single positive test, let alone what would happen if there’s a mini-outbreak on a college campus."

>> Situational Awareness: “It’s not that these are possibilities, I think they are varying degrees of likelihood,” said Dr. Michael Saag, a world-renowned infectious disease expert based at UAB. “It’s almost not science, it’s common sense. What we have to do is the people who are making the decisions are going to have to sit in a room with a whiteboard and figure out all the what-ifs and come up with what’s tolerable and what’s reckless in terms of people’s health, especially the athletes and coaches.”

>> Reality Check: “If you start seeing 3-4 cases on a team, you couldn’t isolate just those sick players,” Zachary Binney, an epidemiologist at Emory University, said. “You’d have to assume you had widespread transmission within the team, and you’d need to shut that team down and quarantine everyone for two weeks.”

>> Between The Lines: "Those scenarios have ... prompted concerns about the lengths some could take to keep football going even in the face of a pandemic. One Power 5 administrator openly speculated that teams might not be upfront about positive tests if it meant an automatic shutdown. “You better hope no school is covering things up,” the administrator told AL.com but they couldn’t help but be skeptical that a win-at-all-costs program would really shut it all down for a third-string punter."

>> Worth Noting: “When you have your first case diagnosed at 4 p.m. today, you probably need the entire team tested within 24 hours of the event as well as all of their contacts,” said Dr. Neel Gandhi, associate professor of epidemiology and infectious diseases at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health, who specializes in tuberculosis and HIV research. “We’re talking roommates, fraternity houses, etc. when that first case occurs and triggers a cascade that is a very labor-intensive cascade and has to happen very quickly. If it takes 3-5 days to do that investigation and that testing, you are likely to have several folds greater number of secondary infections than if you do it within hours.”

>> The Final Word: “There’s nothing more I would love to see than this season to move forward but I worry moving forward without proper planning is going to put a lot of people in harm’s way, and that’s not tolerable for me,” Saag said. 

2. Who is Going to Struggle?

Northeast Rules in WSJ/THE Ranking of Liberal-Arts Schools - WSJ
by Rick Seltzer, InsideHigherEd.com

"About four in 10 colleges and universities whose debt Moody’s Investors Service rates are positioned well financially during the coronavirus crisis, one in 10 are heavily exposed to challenges and the remaining half face differing degrees of stress.

That’s according to a new report the ratings agency released assessing credit risks for its U.S. higher education portfolio. Moody’s evaluation assumed a base case of colleges and universities resuming classes in the fall while facing various degrees of declining enrollment, diminished endowment income, falling state funding and lower philanthropic income. Risk would increase if campuses are closed in the fall, the report said.

The good news for investors is that colleges and universities that have issued the vast majority of debt in the sector are the same ones poised to stand up under coronavirus-related operational shocks."

>> Why It Matters: "Another 10 percent of the colleges and universities Moody’s rates face “more material credit risks” because of the pandemic, the ratings agency found. Such colleges experience weak student demand even as they rely heavily on student-related revenue like tuition and fees. They also post thin operating margins and have little liquidity. They are often small private colleges or regional public universities in states where the number of high school graduates is expected to decline."

>> What They're Saying: "About 10% of schools already faced challenges before the pandemic, and will confront more substantial financial difficulties because of it." - Susan Shaffer, VP-Senior Credit Officer

>> Read More

 

3.  Preparing for the Fall
 


Joe Onderko, commissioner of the Presidents Athletic Conference, sat down with for a conversation with Westminster (Pa.) College's WCN247.com. The president of the Division III Commissioners Association, he discussed the conference response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the outlook ahead for collegiate athletics.

>> Listen to Dr. B's "Roundtable"

 
 
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4.  Fall Plans



From the Chronicle of Higher Education, here’s a complete alphabetical list of Division III colleges that have either disclosed their plans, mentioned them in news reports, or set a deadline for deciding. as of May 14, 4:55 p.m. EDT

 

5. Comings and Goings
 
 
6.  1 Voting Thing


Snapchat is working to get younger users to register to vote, executives tell Sara Fischer.
  • When a user turns 18, Snapchat pushes a notification with directions to register to vote.
Why it matters: The company was able to successfully register 450,000 people through its app during the 2018 midterms. New data show that 50% of those registered actually went out and casted ballots.


Have a great weekend.

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Thursday, May 14, 2020

Students Want to Come Back

D3Playbook
MAY 14, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

>> Good Thursday Morning!  

>> Today's Word Count: 1,078. Brief, concise. Easy to digest. 

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  Students Want to Come Back

Illustration of a tissue box with ruled paper coming out instead of tissues.
 
Nearly two-thirds of college students say they would attend in-person classes if colleges reopen in the fall, even if there is no coronavirus vaccine or cure, Axios' Neal Rothschild writes from a new College Reaction poll.
  • Why it matters: This is another sign that Americans' tolerance of social distancing is not going to last forever.
  • The results could be good news for the financial survival of colleges and universities, but a huge challenge from a public-health perspective.
By the numbers, from the May 8-10 poll of 835 college students, with a margin of error of ±3.4 percentage points:
  • 65% say they would attend in-person classes.
  • 31% say they would only attend virtually.
  • 4% say they would withdraw from school.
Between the lines: The desire to attend classes in person comes as students report that the virtual education experience is full of pitfalls:
  • 45% say they attend class less often, and more than 70% say they're distracted by their phone, computer and things going on at home.

 
2. Boston College Takes Over Pine Manor


Pine Manor College in Brookline. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

by Max Larkin, WBUR

"Pine Manor College will enter into an "educational partnership" with Boston College, after the pandemic-related closures stretched its finances to a breaking point.

A memorandum of understanding between the two schools paves the way for Boston College to take on all of Pine Manor's assets — including their leafy, 45-acre campus in Chestnut Hill — as well as their liabilities. Boston College will also cover Pine Manor's operating expenses as they "teach out" current students for up to two years.

>> Why It Matters: It's the first such consolidation announced since the pandemic, which is putting a strain on college finances across Massachusetts and worldwide."

>> Reality Check: "The two schools also share a historic commitment to educating underserved communities of students, but their student bodies don't resemble each other. Students of color and international students made up 93% of Pine Manor's enrollment in the fall of 2018 (the latest data available), while only 42% of Boston College's enrollment came from the same communities."

>> Worth Noting: "Pine Manor's campus — complete with a historic mansion and residential halls — is only a mile and a half away from BC's Chestnut Hill hub."

>> Of Note: Pine Manor is a member of the ACAA.


 
3. Furlough Tracker


"As the coronavirus outbreak erodes financial health and administrative confidence at universities and colleges across the country, some have started to lay off or furlough employees en masse to thwart colossal budget shortfalls. Amid this unprecedented challenge to higher education’s business model, The Chronicle is tracking those employment actions to better understand what America’s higher-education work force will look like after the pandemic abates."

Drew - approximately 70 (furlough)
Guilford - 133 (furlough)
Ithaca - 167 (temporary layoff)
Keene State - 92 (furlough)
Knox - 55 (permanent layoff)
Neumann - 31 (23 furlough, 8 temporary layoff)
Rensselaer - 280 (furlough)
Rochester - N/A (furlough)
Simmons - 12 (permanent layoff)
Smith - N/A (furlough)
Union - 19 (unspecified)
UW-Oshkosh - 180 (furlough)
UW-River Falls - 65 (furlough)
UW-Stevens Point - approximately 200 (furlough)
UW-Stout - 69 (furlough)
UW-Whitewater - 99 (temporary layoff)
Washington U. - approximately 1,300 (furlough)
Western New England - 60 (furlough)

as of 8 p.m., May 13

 
4.  Fall Plans




From the Chronicle of Higher Education, here’s a complete alphabetical list of Division III colleges that have either disclosed their plans, mentioned them in news reports, or set a deadline for deciding.
  • Carnegie Mellon - planning a range of scenarios
  • Kenyon - planning for in-person
  • MIT - no firm deadline, but hopes for a decision in late late June or early July
  • Tufts - planning a range of scenarios
according to the Chronicle, here is a list of DIII institutions that are considering a range of scenarios: Alma, Babson, Carnegie Mellon, Grinnell, Redlands, Rochester, Sarah Lawrence, St. Olaf, Stevens, Tufts, U. of Pittsburgh (campuses), U. of Wisconsin (campuses), Worcester State.

as of May 13, 7:08 p.m. EDT


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5. STUNTastic
 

The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics noted the continued growth in high school STUNT sponsorship and participation, steady increase in the number of member institutions sponsoring STUNT, and support from the sport’s national governing body as compelling rationale to include STUNT as an emerging sport for women.

The committee further noted the relatively low cost of sponsoring the sport and the opportunity for the sport to enrich sponsoring institutions’ enrollment management strategies.

>> What They're Saying: STUNT leadership demonstrated that current STUNT programs are fully integrated into athletics departments as stand-alone programs, the experience of a STUNT student-athlete is comparable to the experience of student-athletes who compete in NCAA sports, and the sport’s organizational structure and sport rules are consistent with NCAA values and legislation.

 
6.  The List

William Smith Lacrosse to host Liberty League semifinals ...
Most wins in the NCAA women's lacrosse tournament without a championship.

22 - William Smith
17 - Catholic
16 - Mary Washington
11 - Bowdoin, Colby, Colorado College
10 - Washington and Lee
9 - York (Pa.)
8 - Tufts, Williams

 

7.  Comings and Goings
 

 
8.  1 Quarantine Cocktail Thing
 
Massachusetts: Old-Fashioned
by Madeline Buiano, The Daily Meal 

"Most of America is staying home as a way to mitigate risks of the coronavirus spreading, so people across the country are trying to get their cocktail fix from their own kitchens. With a little help from search engines, people are looking for everything from frozen daiquiris to martinis, and there are clear trends in each state. From Alabama to Wyoming, these are the uniquely searched cocktails in Google over the past 30 days."

The most-popular: Old-Fashioned.
District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Virginia, Washington

>> Caught My Eye: The people of Mississippi want to know how to make a Painkiller, which is one drink that’s sure to teleport you to the most beautiful beaches in the world. All you’ll need to make the drink is rum, pineapple juice, orange juice, cream of coconut and nutmeg.

>> What Are You Doing After Work Today?

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Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Not Our Call

D3Playbook
MAY 13, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy D3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
>> Good Wednesday morning!

>> Today's Word Count: 1.127. An easy morning read.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

1.  Not Our Call

NCAA name, image, likeness group could change everything - Sports ...
by Heather Dinich, ESPN

"The NCAA won't mandate or oversee a uniform return to college sports, NCAA president Mark Emmert said Tuesday, leaving decisions on start dates with state officials and university presidents.

College athletics came to a halt in mid-March, when the NCAA cancelled the men's and women's basketball tournaments, along with all remaining winter and spring championships because of the evolving threat of the coronavirus pandemic. There is still no timetable for a return, and Emmert said it's not the NCAA's role to determine one in this instance.

  • "Normally there's an agreed upon start date for every sport, every season," Emmert told ESPN, "but under these circumstances, now that's all been derailed by the pandemic. It won't be the conferences that can do that, either. It will be the local and state health officials that say whether or not you can open and play football with fans."

>> Situational Awareness: "Earlier Tuesday, several Pac-12 football coaches expressed support for an NCAA-mandated uniform start to the season while on a video conference call with reporters. This followed Penn State coach James Franklin's comments last week that it would be helpful for the NCAA to give some national guidelines in addition to what each state and university determines."

>> Reality Check: "Local campuses have to decide are we opening up and are we bringing students back to play sports," said Emmert. The NCAA doesn't mandate that, nor should it. The schools themselves have to make those choices."

>> Continue Reading


2.  The Virus as the Cure


by Joe Nocera, Bloomberg News

"This is not going to be the most politic sentence I’ve written, but here goes: The coronavirus pandemic could be the best thing that’s ever happened to college athletics.

As the saying goes, “Necessity is the mother of invention.” In the case of college sports, the lack of funds could force the college athletic establishment to take measures it should have taken at least two decades ago. The scenario I outline below may not necessarily happen. In a sane world, it should.

Athletic directors will tell you that the last thing they want to do is cut teams, but the pandemic is going to give them no choice, no matter what the NCAA says. Take the University of Akron. It currently fields 19 teams, but in a recent video, university president Gary Miller announced that the school had a $65 million budget gap that he hoped to close by eliminating six of its 11 colleges and making deep, as yet unannounced, cuts in athletics. The chance that Miller can preserve 16 of its 19 teams while eliminating more than half the academic colleges is zero.

>> Why It Matters: "As schools make the inevitable deep cuts in vital academic programs, they will also have to make similar cuts in its — let’s face it — less vital athletic programs; otherwise, students and professors alike will revolt. And the idea that the NCAA is going to be the arbiter of which schools can drop below 16 teams and which can’t is ludicrous."

>> The Bottom Line: "Here is the most important potential change: The little guys will stop chasing the big guys, a hopeless race in any case."

>> Go Deeper

3.  Committee Makes COVID Decisions

The Division III Administrative Committee on Thursday approved a recommendation from the Division III Championships Committee to cancel championships banquets and move all sport committee meetings to digital platforms for the 2020-21 academic year.

The Championships Committee examined potential budget cuts at the request of the Strategic Planning and Finance Committee in response to the budget shortfall caused by the cancellation of the remaining 2019-20 winter and spring championships due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in an effort to meet the division’s mandated reserve policy (50% of the annual revenue) through the end of the current CBS/Turner contract (2023-24).

>> The Bottom Line: By canceling the banquets for the upcoming academic year and moving all sport committee annual meetings to a virtual format, the Championships Committee is projecting a total savings of $440,000.

>> What's Next: The Administrative Committee also heard from the Championships Committee regarding other potential reductions in the division’s “supplemental spend,” which are championships expenses that are not part of the base budget, in the areas of ground transportation and a pilot program to avoid preliminary-round conference matchups.

>> Keep Reading

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4. Fall Plans


From the Chronicle of Higher Education, here’s an alphabetical list of Division III colleges that have either disclosed their plans, mentioned them in news reports, or set a deadline for deciding.
  • Adrian - planning to reopen campus for fall
  • Bethel - planning for in-person
  • Concordia (Chicago) - plans to return to campus, with hybrid option available
  • George Fox - plans to open campus in the fall
  • Grove City - planning for in-person
  • Redlands - planning a range of options, and expects an update by mid-June
  • Swarthmore - anticipates being able to share plans by June 1
  • Transylvania - will announce fall plans in early june
  • Washington College - intends to return to in-person classes on August 31
  • Wellesley - will announce fall plans by July 1
  • Western New England - planning for in-person
  • Wittenberg - planning for in-person

as of May 12, 4:58 p.m. EDT


5.  The Return of "Free Play"



One positive from the shutdown is the reemergence of "free play," Axios Sports' Kendall Baker and Jeff Tracy write in a special report on youth sports.
  • Families are being active together, and kids are riding bikes and running more.
Why it matters: The past few months have been a return to the way kids played sports a generation or two ago (or how they do in in Norway).
  • This could ultimately help erase the notion that sports equal "organized play," and ultimately create a future where free play has a bigger role.
Go deeper ... "Special report: Coronavirus puts youth sports on pause."

- courtesy of Axios


6.  Comings and Goings


7.  1 Gender Reveal Thing 


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