Friday, May 8, 2020

The Coronavirus Enrollment Crash

D3Playbook
MAY 8, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
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1. The Coronavirus Enrollment Crash



With unprecedented turmoil over standardized testing, the unmooring of the admissions calendar, and uncertainty around whether campuses will reopen for the fall-2020 semester, enrollment managers and consultants are confronting greater challenges than ever before. How do things look from where they sit? Here’s what they told us.
"What do colleges and dinosaurs have in common? The risk of extinction. Dinosaurs had an asteroid; we have a pandemic. Even before Covid-19, the enrollment market was under duress — too many seats chasing too few students, and too many presidents pursuing growth agendas to balance future budgets. In such a market, victory belongs to nimble institutions that pivot quickly and boldly. One president I work with is doing just that by eliminating undersubscribed majors and identifying new in-demand programs." - Madeline Rhyneer, VP at EAB Consulting

Anyone who speaks with absolute certainty about what fall will bring to campuses is just kidding themselves. And others. Our business runs on historical trends and economic principles. The size of the market of potential college students, the rate of inflation that drives tuition increases, price modeling based on historical data, and the actions of competitors all influence our predictions about the future. But we have no model variable for "pandemic effects." Higher education cannot speak collectively about whether we’ll be Zoom U. or business as usual next fall, or some combination of those. How to manage? I’m going to suggest a novel approach: Consider students and their parents before you consider yourselves. - Jon Boeckenstedt, VP Enrollment Management, Oregon State

"One of the more optimistic responders (to an email poll) indicated that their institution was examining "Best, Expected, and Worse (not worst)" enrollment scenarios. Another (perhaps more realistic) responder said they were considering scenarios labeled "Bad, Very Bad, and Worst-Case." In an April survey, 11 percent of high-school seniors who had planned to enroll at a traditional college said they no longer planned to do so. And if colleges offer only online education this fall, many more may take a gap year or choose a different college. This is one of my greatest concerns. If my institution is forced to teach remotely because we can’t do it safely in person, will students enroll?" - Stefanie D. Niles, VP Enrollment, Ohio Wesleyan

"In every crisis lies opportunity for reinvention. The impact of Covid-19 on higher education is no different. For the past several weeks, we have seen colleges drop standardized-testing requirements, change enrollment deadlines, require fewer financial-aid documents, and cancel deposits. This was done in the spirit of being flexible, sensitive, and student centered. What if we reinvent the college process to make these permanent goals? Colleges should join together to reimagine a process that gives them the evaluation information they need and makes the process less cumbersome for students. - Angel B. Perez, VP Enrollment, Trinity (Conn.)

>> Read more from the Chronicle of Higher Education ($)

2. "A DIII Coach Through and Through"


Before becoming a five-time NBA champion as head coach of the San Antonio Spurs, Gregg Popovich began his career at Division III Pomona-Pitzer. (Courtesy: Peter Osgood and Tiago Hammil)

by Matthew Kim and Kellen Browning, The (Claremont) Student Life

"This March, the Pomona-Pitzer men’s basketball team was on a roll.

A miraculous buzzer-beater sent the Division III Sagehens to the Sweet Sixteen for the first time in program history — until the coronavirus pandemic brought an abrupt halt to the NCAA’s March Madness and the rest of normal life around the world.

The dominance of these Hens, before their sudden stoppage, would have been unimaginable 40 years ago, when a hapless Pomona-Pitzer squad had just put the finishing touches on a dismal 2-22 campaign.

Leading that team was a 31-year-old rookie head coach by the name of Gregg Popovich, who had jumped at the opportunity to move from assistant coaching at the Air Force Academy to taking the reins of the essentially unknown DIII Pomona-Pitzer.

These days, Popovich, or Pop, is a basketball icon and household name, with five NBA titles as head coach of the San Antonio Spurs, three NBA Coach of the Year awards and the most career wins in league history under his belt.

But in 1980, still at the beginning of his eight-year stint with the Sagehens, he was just another DIII coach trying to figure out how to motivate a group of not-so-talented collegiate athletes at a consortium of tiny liberal arts schools.

>> Reality Check: “Little did I know that their program sucked,” said Popovich, now 71, speaking to TSL by phone from San Antonio as he waits out the pandemic and suspension of the NBA season.

>> The Big Picture: Pop took the job, moved to Claremont and lived with his family in Harwood Court, which still houses Pomona first-years and sophomores. He quickly fell in love with the college’s close-knit academic environment. “I was in awe the whole time I was there, just with the level of professionalism, the level of intelligence,” he said. “I just thought it was an opportunity of a lifetime. I miss it. I always say that I’m faking it as an NBA coach because at heart, I’m a Division III coach through and through.”

>>  Between The Lines: "Before Popovich arrived, he was unaware that Pomona and Pitzer, where athletics took a backseat to academics, didn’t bother to recruit athletes. “I was just so naive — I didn’t think that that was even a possibility, that no one was ever recruited,” he said.

>> Of Note: "(An) anecdote recollects a practice at which Popovich, frustrated with his players’ poor shooting at the charity stripe, had them strip off an article of clothing every time they missed a free throw. “I have no recollection of such things,” Pop said with a laugh. “Fake news.”

>> Worth Noting: "That rivalry (with CMS) has been bigger to me than any rivalry I’ve had in the NBA,” he said. “It’s not even close. Winning or losing to Claremont McKenna was like life and death. If we won, you’re high forever. If you lost, you wanted to jump off the building.”


3.  Pics du Jour



Signs of things to come?

Spanish Flu, Ohio State - Land-Grant Holy Land

Carnegie Mellon on Twitter: "The impact of #COVID19 on Carnegie ...

>> Go deeper: War, fever and sports in 1918 (an Axios Sports Special)


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4.  Fall Plans



From the Chronicle of Higher Education, here’s a complete alphabetical list of Division III colleges that have either disclosed their plans, mentioned them in news reports, or set a deadline for deciding.
From the Chronicle of Higher Education, here’s an alphabetical list of Division III colleges that have either disclosed their plans, mentioned them in news reports, or set a deadline for deciding.
  • Augustana - planning for in-person fall classes
  • Catholic - planning to reopen in the fall
  • Lynchburg - planning in-person fall classes
  • Maryville - “cautiously optimistic” about in-person fall classes
  • Ohio Northern - plans to resume in-person classes
  • Saint Mary's, Ind. - plans to reopen in the fall
  • Scranton - planning for in-person fall classes
as of May 7, 5:52 p.m. EDT


5. Comings and Goings


6.  1 Pool Thing



Have a great weekend.

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Thursday, May 7, 2020

Colleges Gamble on Reopening in the Fall

D3Playbook
MAY 7, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

>> Good Thursday Morning!  

>> Today's Word Count: 1,330. Brief, concise. Easy to digest. And a scooby snack at the end.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  Colleges Gamble on Reopening in Fall
 
Illustration of a graduation cap with an open sign replacing the tassel
by Erica Pandey, Axios

"Colleges around the U.S. are formulating plans to welcome students back to campus this fall — afraid they'll be headed for financial catastrophe if they remain closed.

The big picture: Social distancing could still be in place and medical experts say a second wave of coronavirus cases is possible in the fall, but for many universities, the revenue blows that would come with an online semester are too severe to weather. They've got no option but to figure out how to reopen.
  • If colleges don't open this fall, “[i]t’s not a question of whether institutions will be forced to permanently close. It’s how many," Brown University President Christina Paxson wrote in a New York Times op-ed.

Yes, but: College administrators are "surely aware that when you bring a whole bunch of students back, it's not like opening up an office building where everyone sits carefully in their cubicles," says Graeme Wood, a professor at Yale and a correspondent for the Atlantic. "That's not what college is."
  • Telling millions of college students — many of whom are experiencing their first taste of independence — that they can't see friends and throw parties is easier said than done.
  • Think of the thousands of students who went on spring break trips and crowded beaches even after several states had put social distancing guidelines in place.

On top of that, college campuses are designed to be dense environments where students eat, live and learn together — and mix and mingle with all types of people through different dorm assignments, extracurriculars and seminars along the way.
  • To isolate students is "contrary to the ideas of a liberal education," Wood says. 'That's not a college experience that's working the way it's supposed to."

The bottom line: The trajectory of the pandemic continues to change rapidly, and colleges' time to put testing and tracing plans into place is running out.
  • "The only certainty is the uncertainty," says Andrew McMichael, a dean at Auburn University at Montgomery tells Axios. "Anybody, including me, that tells you they know what's going to happen in the fall is wrong."

2.  Fall Plans




From the Chronicle of Higher Education, here’s a complete alphabetical list of Division III colleges that have either disclosed their plans, mentioned them in news reports, or set a deadline for deciding.
  • Agnes Scott - plans to resume on-campus instruction
  • Elmhurst - planning to return to in-person classes in August
  • Emerson - conducting a student poll to help in decision process
  • Milwaukee School of Engineering - planning to reopen in the fall
  • Penn State campuses - expects updates on fall semester by June 15
  • Simpson - intends to have in-person fall classes
  • U. of Pittsburgh campuses - says "back to normal probably is not likely" for the fall

as of May 6, 6 p.m. EDT


3. New Title IX Rules
 
by Sarah Brown, Chronicle of Higher Education

The U.S. Department of Education on Wednesday announced sweeping changes in how colleges must handle sexual-assault and sexual-harassment complaints, bolstering protections for accused students and employees.

The long-awaited changes in the enforcement of Title IX, the federal gender-equity law, will require colleges to hold live hearings and allow cross-examination when adjudicating sexual-misconduct complaints. The new regulations also will narrow the scope of complaints that colleges are required to investigate. In other words, according to the federal government, Title IX covers only sexual harassment that meets its new definition: “unwelcome conduct” that is “so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to education.”

The changes (summarized here and here) will take effect on August 14.

College officials have been anticipating the new rules for more than a year. Many fear that the mandates are too burdensome and could dissuade sexual-assault victims from coming forward.

>> What They're Saying: “Civil rights really can’t wait,” Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said. “It’s not a surprise to institutions that it was coming.”

>> Counterpoint: “At a time when institutional resources already are stretched thin, colleges and universities should not be asked to divert precious resources away from more critical efforts in order to implement regulations unrelated to this extraordinary crisis,” the American Council on Education said.

>> Be Smart: "Administrators probably aren’t going to dismiss a sexual-misconduct report just because it doesn’t meet the new federal definition, said Jeff Nolan, a Title IX lawyer. "But Title IX hearings will be a huge resource drain for many institutions at a time when money is already tight."

>> Go Deeper


 

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4.  The List
 
Most wins in the NCAA basketball championship tournament without a title. Does not include 2020 contests.

Men
45 - Franklin & Marshall
44 - Augustana
36 - Wooster
32 - Hope
27 - Clark
25 - Stockton
23 - John Carroll, William Paterson
22 - Christopher Newport
21 - Salem State

Women
44 - Southern Maine
41 - Bowdoin
33 - Tufts
32 - UW-Eau Claire
30 - Rochester
27 - Christopher Newport, UW-Whitewater
23 - Kean
22 - Marymount
21 - Calvin

 

5.  Comings and Goings
 

 
6.  1 Scooby Thing
 
by John-Paul Steele, The Atlantic

"I grew up watching Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! every Saturday morning. The Hanna-Barbera cartoon had launched in 1969, two years after my birth, so it was precisely in my little-kid sweet spot. Much as I loved it, though, the feeble animation and repetitive plots were apparent even to the young me. Whereas characters such as Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny seemed eternal, extending far into the past and future, Scooby-Doo felt like a show just for that particular moment, for my specific childhood.

Fast-forward 35 years or so, and to my astonishment, my children loved it just as much as I had. I probably wound up watching more Scooby-Doo episodes with my kids than I had watched as a kid. Evidence suggests that my experience is not unique.

Which raises the obvious question: What on earth is going on? Why has Scooby-Doodescribed by the New York Times film critic A. O. Scott in 2002 as “one of the cheapest, least original products of modern American juvenile culture”—outlasted not only such Hanna-Barbera brethren as The Flintstones and Yogi Bear, but also pretty much everything else on television? The Washington Post’s Hank Stuever once summed up the cartoon’s message as “Kids should meddle, dogs are sweet, life is groovy, and if something scares you, you should confront it.” But that hardly seems enough for half a century of on-air appeal."

>> They Said It: "Carl Sagan hailed the show as a “public service … in which paranormal claims are systematically investigated and every case is found to be explicable in prosaic terms.”

>> I would've kept reading if it wasn't for you meddling kids


 
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Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Hockey Rule Changes?

D3Playbook
MAY 6, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy D3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
>> Good Wednesday morning!

>> Today's Word Count: 670. An easy morning read.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.


1.  What Rules Might Ice Hockey Change?

The Big Ten referee C.J. Beaurline calls and NCAA tournament game. Photo by Jim Rosvold/University of Minnesota Athletics
by Brad Elliott Schlossman, Grand Forks Herald

"There will be two common themes when the NCAA Rules Committee meets virtually next month to discuss rules changes in college hockey: speeding up the game and increasing scoring opportunities.

College hockey has the ability to change the rulebook every other year and this is one of those years. Despite the coronavirus pandemic, the NCAA Rules Committee is proceeding ahead this offseason.

While the top of its list is figuring out how to proceed with overtime, the committee is expected to take a look at several ways to address the length of games and increase scoring opportunities. Here are nine rules ideas that are expected to be among the discussions:
  1. Eliminating 5x5 Overtime
  2. Changing Video Review Criteria
  3. Penalties for Bad Challenges
  4. Playing the Puck Off the Netting
  5. Keeping Centers In on Draws
  6. Choosing Faceoff Side
  7. A Subtle Change in Line Changes
  8. A Slight Change at the Blue Line
  9. Farewell, Handshakes?
2.  Vacancy

More than 600 colleges appear on the College Openings Update, published by the National Association for College Admission Counseling. That means they have space for students in the fall.

NACAC publishes the list in early May and then publishes updates later in the summer. Last year, 419 colleges participated in the May list; a few years ago, the number was less than 300.

While the list is not a pure survey -- different colleges respond in different years -- it's another indication that this year will be challenging for many colleges.

3. Fall Plans


From the Chronicle of Higher Education, here’s an alphabetical list of Division III colleges that have either disclosed their plans, mentioned them in news reports, or set a deadline for deciding.
  • Averett - making plans to reopen in the fall
  • Belhaven - planning to for in-person classes in the fall
  • Lewis & Clark - Planning for in-person fall classes
  • Marymount - planning for in-person fall classes
  • Otterbein - Planning to open campus in the fall
  • RIT - optimistic” about being open for fall
  • Schreiner - planning for in-person fall classes

as of May 5, 6:49 p.m. EDT


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4.  New Normal?



A TV cameraman walks through the spectators' seats, which are covered with pictures of fans, before the start of a regular-season baseball game in Incheon, South Korea, where the season started yesterday (without live fans).

5.  The List

UT Tyler Patriots on Twitter: "RETWEET to congratulate @Patriot_sb ...

DIII Softball National Championships
6 - College of New Jersey
4 - Central, Eastern Connecticut
3 - Tufts
2 - Linfield, Simpson, St. Thomas, Virginia Wesleyan
1 - Buena Vista, Chapman, East Texas Baptist, Ithaca, Messiah, Muskingum, Pacific Lutheran, Rutgers-Camden, Saint Mary's (Minn.), Texas Lutheran, Texas-Tyler, UW-Eau Claire, UW-Stevens Point.

Most Runner-Up Finishes
6 - TCNJ
4 - Chapman
3 - Salisbury
2 - Buena Vista, Central, Eastern Connecticut, Linfield, UW-Whitewater

source: NCAA
6.  Comings and Goings


7.  1 Pup Thing 



Harbor, a Labrador retriever pup, takes a nap during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. Photo: Mary Altaffer, AP/File

The American Kennel Club's top 10 dog breeds list.
  1. Labrador retrievers
  2. German shepherds
  3. Golden retrievers
  4. French bulldogs
  5. Bulldogs
  6. Poodles
  7. Beagles
  8. Rottweilers
  9. German shorthaired pointers
  10. Pembroke Welsh corgis


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