Friday, May 1, 2020

S&P Slashes Outlook

D3Playbook
MAY 1, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Friday Morning! Welcome to May. Here's hoping that it is better than April.

>> Today's Word Count: 995. Not wasting your time. Smart, concise. An informative read that's just about 4 minutes.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. We appreciate your kind words of support. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1. S&P Slashes Outlook for Colleges

America's prettiest college campus? According to one guidebook ...

"S&P Global Ratings dropped outlooks on more than a quarter of the colleges and universities it rates because of the COVID-19 pandemic’s effects on higher education.

The ratings agency cut ratings on 117 colleges -- 84 private institutions and 33 public institutions -- from stable to negative. It changed outlooks for 10 more -- seven private and three public -- from positive to stable. And it left unchanged outlooks for 50 institutions that were already negative.

Those actions mean the share of colleges and universities that S&P rates with negative outlooks has more than quadrupled in just a few months. At the end of 2019, just 9.2 percent of its rated higher ed universe had negative outlooks. After the actions announced today, 38 percent does. The agency maintains public ratings on 436 public and private colleges and universities."

>> Why It Matters: "A negative outlook for a college or university means S&P sees at least a one-in-three chance operating and economic conditions will significantly affect the institution’s credit characteristics."

>> The Big Picture: “The financial impact on institutions from the loss of auxiliary revenue from housing and dining fees, and parking fees; as well as revenues from athletics, theater, and other events, is material for many.” - S&P

>> Worth Noting: "Many institutions that the agency rates are expected to be able to absorb some of the pandemic’s impacts because they have built up strong reserves and balance sheets against relatively low debt levels. But if global travel restrictions stay in place and international and domestic enrollment falls, serious operational pressures will result."

>> By the Numbers: Division III has four public and 31 private colleges that were revised down to negative. Two state systems were also revised down. Thirteen others had negative outlooks prior to the revision. Five institutions were revised from stable to positive.

>> Read More

 
2. Presidents Council Recap
 
"Division III student-athletes would be able to be compensated for tutoring, private lessons, book publishing, modeling or autographs, according to two concepts discussed by the Presidents Council at its meeting this week.

The Presidents Council, the highest governing body in Division III, reviewed two concepts around name, image and likeness that have received support from the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, Interpretations and Legislation Committee, and the Management Council.

 “Allowing student-athletes to monetize their name, image and likeness is extremely important,” said Tori Murden McClure, Presidents Council chair and president at Spalding. “These changes will allow student-athletes to benefit from opportunities that other students enjoy when they employ their discipline, determination and hard work.”

The Division III concepts will be distributed to the membership in May to gather additional feedback before the Management Council’s July meeting and the Presidents Council’s early August meeting. The goal is to have new name, image and likeness legislation adopted at the 2021 NCAA Convention and then implemented before the 2021-22 academic year."

>> Go Deeper


 

3.  PROP Delays Rules Changes

NCAA Division II on Twitter: "NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel ...

The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel approved delaying rules changes in five sports for a year to mitigate the financial impact on athletics budgets in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The sports where the implementation will be delayed are baseball, men’s basketball, men’s lacrosse, softball, and swimming and diving.

In baseball, Divisions II and III were scheduled to begin regular-season bat barrel compression testing in spring 2021. Instead, Division II and III baseball programs must be compliant with the rule by spring 2022.

Division II and III men’s basketball programs were scheduled to move their three-point lines to the international distance of 22 feet, 1¾ inches for the 2020-21 season. Instead, the rule change will be delayed until 2021-22 for Division II and III men’s basketball competition.

In men’s lacrosse, teams in all three divisions were going to be required to have two visible shot clocks with the ability to reset them to different times by the 2021 season. That requirement will be delayed until 2022.

In swimming and diving, Division II and III programs were to be required to have two officials for dual, double-dual, triangular and quadrangular meets in the regular season for the 2020-21 academic year. The two divisions also were going to be required to have four officials for invitational and championship meets in 2020-21. This rule will go into effect in 2021-22.

>> Keep Reading

 
 
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4.  The List 


Billy Wagner - Ferrum '93a | Bill Wagner pitching at Ferrum … | Flickr Billy Wagner | Society for American Baseball Research

Baseball - Fewest Hits Allowed per Nine Innings
2.22 - Billy Wagner, Ferrum, 1991-93
4.59 - Danny Serreino, Rowan, 2017-19
4.79 - Scott Budner, Eastern Connecticut, 1975-77
4.94 - Chris Salamida, Oneonta, 2005-06
5.00 - Matt DeSalvo, Marietta, 1999-03

minimum two years played and 100 innings pitched


 

5. Comings and Goings
 
 
6.  1 Horse Thing
 
Jockey Ron Turcotte rides Secretariat to victory in the Kentucky Derby, May 5, 1973. Photo: AP

The Kentucky Derby has been postponed from this weekend back to Sept. 5, but there'll be a unique show either way, AP reports.
  • Secretariat is the early 7-2 favorite for this weekend’s virtual Kentucky Derby, an animated race between all 13 Triple Crown winners.
  • Beginning tomorrow, fans can choose their favorite horse to win on KentuckyDerby.com.
  • Anyone who selects the winning horse will be entered to win a VIP experience at the Derby. They can also donate to emergency relief efforts.
- courtesy of Axios

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Thursday, April 30, 2020

BOG Supports NIL, To a Point

D3Playbook
APRIL 30, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

>> Good Thursday Morning!  45 years ago, the Vietnam War ended. U.S. deaths to COVID-19 have surpassed the deaths in Southeast Asia during the war.

>> Today's Word Count: 884. Brief, concise. Easy to digest.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  BOG Supports NIL, To a Point
 

 
"At its meeting this week, the (NCAA) Board of Governors supported rule changes to allow student-athletes to receive compensation for third-party endorsements both related to and separate from athletics. It also supports compensation for other student-athlete opportunities, such as social media, businesses they have started and personal appearances within the guiding principles originally outlined by the board in October.

While student-athletes would be permitted to identify themselves by sport and school, the use of conference and school logos, trademarks or other involvement would not be allowed. The board emphasized that at no point should a university or college pay student-athletes for name, image and likeness activities.

The board directed all three divisions to consider appropriate rules changes based on recommendations from its Federal and State Legislation Working Group."

>> What They're Saying: "“The NCAA’s work to modernize name, image and likeness continues, and we plan to make these important changes on the original timeline, no later than January 2021,” said Gene Smith, Ohio State senior vice president and athletics director and working group co-chair. “The board’s decision today provides further guidance to each division as they create and adopt appropriate rules changes.”"

>> What's Next: "The board’s recommendations now will move to the rules-making structure in each of the NCAA’s three divisions for further consideration. The divisions are expected to adopt new name, image and likeness rules by January to take effect at the start of the 2021-22 academic year."

>> Be Smart: "Still: Whether the modernization is reluctant or willing no longer matters. The fact that it is happening matters. The fact that the NCAA is prepared to push forward despite an avalanche of side effects, consequences and problems is what matters." - Pat FordeSports Illustrated

>> Keep Reading

>> Go Deeper

 

2.  Driving Through a Fog


by Len Gutkin and Maximillian Alvarez, Chronicle of Higher Education

"In the last two months, the coronavirus crisis has forced colleges to shutter their classrooms and dormitories and move instruction online. What will happen next semester? The Chronicle Review talked (via Zoom, of course) with G. Gabrielle Starr and Leon Botstein, the presidents, respectively, of Pomona College and Bard College, to get a sense of how the leaders at smaller, undergraduate-focused liberal-arts schools are handling this critical period.

Starr and Botstein discussed when and how to reopen, the advantages and risks of education technology, the importance of the arts and public culture, disaster preparedness, and the virtues of horror movies.

>> Quotable: "Places like Pomona and ourselves are in a terrifically privileged position because they’re small. We’re not giant tankers trying to move around. We have an obligation to be in the leadership of restoring public culture, and education is part of that public culture. It’s vital to a democracy. We don’t have a choice. We’re not a luxury enterprise." - Botstein

>> Quotable II: "For a whole swath of schools, day-to-day survival is really going to be jeopardized. In terms of job-force development, lost creativity, lost productivity, the United States can’t afford to lose good schools that are serving the country." - Starr

>> Why It Matters: "To use your metaphor about looking under the hood — well, I liken this to driving a car in a thick fog. You go very slowly. You get out of the car and make sure the deer isn’t in the middle of the road. Then you get back in the car and move another few inches." - Botstein.

>> Reality Check: "I think that right now, when it’s time for us to recreate community, the arts are going to be crucial. The arts bring us together. All of the human stories — right now it’s journalism bringing those stories into our lives. But it’s going to be artists, as well, who will be chronicling some of what this has meant for the country." - Starr

>. Keep Reading

 

3. Game On!

The College Conference of Illinois & Wisconsin's (CCIW) men's and women's basketball coaches recently united to raise money for COVID-19 relief.  CCIW coaches were challenged by the Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference (HCAC) to donate funds to the Jeremy Lin Foundation, which go directly to "Feeding America" and "Direct Relief". Along with their donation efforts, the CCIW coaches challenged the Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference's (WIAC) men's and women's basketball coaches to raise money for COVID-19 relief.


 

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4.  #WatchD3
 
Image

Our campaign to have past Division III athletics contests made available to those quarantined and looking for quality viewing continues.
 
Television on Apple iOS 13.3   Today's Feature  Television on Apple iOS 13.3

2016 MAC Commonwealth Final

Messiah vs. Stevenson

https://gomustangsports.com/MustangRewind/20200428-wvb

We hope you enjoyed our look back at some classic #whyD3 contests. D3 has a great deal to offer and by showing prospectives the level of competition, only makes Division III a more viable option. Thanks.
 

 

5.  Comings and Goings
 

 
6.  1 Snack Thing
 

 
Hundreds of thousands of pounds of potatoes are at risk unless Belgians eat more french fries during the coronavirus crisis, Romain Cools, the secretary-general of the country's potato industry group, told CNBC.
  • "We're working with supermarkets to see whether we can launch a campaign asking Belgians to do something for the sector by eating fries — especially frozen fries — twice a week," he said.
The big picture: Frozen potatoes account for 75% of Belgium's potato processing capacity, and demand has been crushed with restaurants shuttered and freezers filled up.

- courtesy of Axios



 
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Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Cause for Concern

D3Playbook
APRIL 29, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy D3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Wednesday morning!

>> Today's Word Count: 991. An easy morning read.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 

1.  Cause for Concern
Significance of May 1 in admissions cycle continues to diminish

by Rick Seltzer, InsideHigherEd.com

"As the traditional May 1 college decision day approaches, admissions leaders have been expressing concern that a significant number of students who’ve paid deposits promising to attend certain campuses will opt against enrolling because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Such decisions could upend the models colleges and universities use to build their freshman classes -- and to balance their budgets.

Today, newly released data from polling of U.S. high school seniors suggest admissions officers may have good reason to be worried.

About 12 percent of such students who have already made deposits no longer plan to attend a four-year college full-time, according to the polling. The findings are being shared today by the consulting firm Art & Science Group, which polled 1,171 high school seniors from April 21-24."

>> Why It Matters: “Here you are before May 1, and you may already have lost a very important component of your class that you’ve been banking on coming,” said Nanci Tessier, senior VP at Art & Science.

>> Reality Check: "About 40 percent of students hadn’t made a deposit anywhere when the Art & Science polling closed. Coming this late in the admissions cycle, that statistic may reflect students’ uncertainty about college this fall. More than four-fifths of students who have not sent in a deposit said they doubted their ability to attend the college or university that is their first choice."

>> Worth Noting: "Taken on the whole, the data could suggest colleges and universities should try to double down on student outreach over the summer. That means staying in touch with any students who were wait-listed, those who may still deposit and even those who have already deposited."

>> Go Deeper

 
2. Money Bag on Apple iOS 13.3 News Up,   American Football on Apple iOS 13.3  News Down
 

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, finance and business news websites have seen a 42% increase in web traffic compared to the same time last year, while sports news websites are down 22%.
  • Counterpoint: D3Playbook's open rate is at an all-time high! Thank you.

 
3. Fall Plans.


From the Chronicle of Higher Education, here’s an alphabetical list of Division III colleges that have either disclosed their plans, mentioned them in news reports, or set a deadline for deciding.
  • George Fox University — plans to open campus in the fall
  • New York University — “proceeding on the basis that it will resume in-person operations” in the fall
  • Randolph College — planning to resume on-campus, residential operations
  • University of Chicago — plans to decide by the end of June
  • University of Maine system (Farmington, Presque Isle, Southern Maine) — planning for in-person classes
  • University of Maryland system (Salisbury) — planning to start in-person, but some larger classes may be online
  • University of Pittsburgh (Bradford, Greensburg) — says "back to normal probably is not likely" for the fall
  • Wheaton College (Mass.) — “We have affirmed our intention to deliver an on-campus fall semester” subject to the guidance of public-health experts.
  • Whitworth University — plans to reopen the campus and resume in-person classes

as of April 28, 6:42 p.m. EDT


 
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4.  #WatchD3
 


Our campaign to have past Division III athletics contests made available to those quarantined and looking for quality viewing continues.

Television on Apple iOS 13.3   Today's Feature  Television on Apple iOS 13.3

2011 Midwest Conference WBB Final

Monmouth vs. St. Norbert
 

As we wind down April and our #WatchD3 campaign, we ask that you all unlock the vaults and share with the DIII community the best of what D3 has to offer in terms of classic games.

5.  The List
 
Lindsey Thayer - Softball - St. John Fisher College Athletics

Strikeouts - Career by a Pitcher
1,540 - Lindsey Thayer, St. John Fisher, 2015-18
1,457 - Hayley Feindel, Coast Guard, 2009-12
1,359 - Caroline Brehm, McDaniel, 2012-15
1,332 - Alex Hill Montclair State, 2011-14
1,315 - Allyson Fournier, Tufts, 2012-15
1,243 - Ashlee Simon, Coe, 2009-12
1,130 - Molly Rathbun, Eastern Connecticut, 2009-12
1,165 - Jennifer Martinez, St. Joseph's (L.I.), 2006-08
1,125 - Laura Heise, St. Scholastica, 2003-06
1,121 - Kelly Schade, Simpson, 1996-99

source: NCAA

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 
 
7.  1 Sad Thing Beer Mug on Apple iOS 13.3

Empty glass bottles including those from wine and beer
 
The coronavirus pandemic forced event centers, sporting venues, bars and restaurants to close across the U.S. — leaving millions of gallons of beer unused and at risk of going stale, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Brewers and distributors will also take a hit from the postponement of Major League Baseball's season, the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and European soccer.

The state of play: The unsold or expired beer could cost the industry as much as $1 billion, per the Journal.
  • Brewers are struggling to figure out what to do with the excess suds. In March, roughly 10 million gallons were abandoned in venues, according to an NBWA estimate.
  • Large quantities of beer can't be dumped into the water stream because environmental regulations say it can negatively impact the pH balance, reduce oxygen and produce bad bacteria.

>> Go Deeper
 

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