Friday, March 27, 2020

Division III Down $22M

D3Playbook
MARCH 27, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
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1. Division III Down $22M

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Division III will receive $22 million less from the NCAA than it did a year ago in a decision announced yesterday in Indianapolis.

The NCAA receives most of its revenue from the Division I Men’s Basketball Championship television and marketing rights, as well as championship ticket sales. The revenue is used to provide distributions to member conferences and schools along with funding championships, national programs and other initiatives to support student-athletes.

Division III will receive 3.18% of actual revenues, currently projected to be $10.7 million for the division, which is a $22 million decrease from last year. These amounts will be used to fund national programs.

>> Situational Awareness: Division III budgeted 75 percent of its allocation to championships - a total of $26.5 million. $8.7 million - or 25 percent - is allocated to non-championship initiatives for 2019-20.

>> Of Note: Included in the non-championships initiatives is $3.2 million to the Strategic Initiative Conference Grants, $1.3 million to the women and minority intern program, and $708,000 for the strategic alliance matching grant.

>> Worth Noting: Division III has budgeted $41,000 for event cancellation insurance.

>> What They're Saying: “As an Association, we must acknowledge the uncertainties of our financial situation and continue to make thoughtful and prudent decisions on how we can assist conferences and campuses in supporting student-athletes now and into the future.” - Michael V. Drake, chair, Board of Governors, president, Ohio State

>> Be Smart: Division III has a mandated annual reserve of 50 percent of the annual overall budget - $16.1 million - as well as a $5 million insurance policy.

>> Read The Entire Release from the NCAA

source: NCAA Division III 2019-20 Facts and Figures

2.  Will Coronavirus Close Your College?


by David Wescott, Chronicle of Higher Education

Robert Zemsky is a professor of higher education at the University of Pennsylvania and a member of Whittier College's Board of Trustees. He recently co-authored a book with Campbell Baldridge and Susan Shaman entitled, The College Stress Test. In it, the co-authors calculated that just 10 percent of the nation's colleges faced severe market risk, while another 30 percent face some risk and are likely to struggle.

That was before the coronavirus. Since the book’s release, Moody’s Investors Service has downgraded its outlook for higher education from stable to negative. A recent survey found that one in six high-school seniors who expected to attend a four-year college full time may now be reconsidering. The outbreak has broken the admissions calendar, cast yield models into chaos, and left academic leaders unsure of what comes next.

>> Quotable: "Everything is up in the air. This whole tradition of, you know, you get your letter of acceptance and you go to an accepted-applicant event — all of that is gone. The yield process is going to be very weird. Colleges are not going to know what to do with their wait lists, for example. So what will happen on just the admissions front is a massive moment of confusion and uncertainty."

>> The Big Picture: "The first question an institution should ask on the financial side is: How much real cash reserves do they have? The second question is: Are they going to be eligible for federal relief? An institution with a poor cash position and uncertain applicants is in real danger."

>> Between The Lines: "Higher ed is full of smart people who ought to be able to figure our way out of this. But I do not see a great leader at one of these universities breaking the mold."

>> Read the entire interview ($)



3.  Jostens Award
 

DePauw's Kopp, Hamilton's Gilmour Named 2020 Jostens Trophy Recipients

Awards season for NCAA Division III women’s and men’s basketball continued on Monday afternoon with the announcement of the 2020 Jostens Trophy recipients, as presented by the Rotary Club of Salem, Va. DePauw University star Sydney Kopp and Hamilton College standout Kena Gilmour are honored with this season’s top awards, which recognize the outstanding student-athletes in Division III basketball for excellence in the classroom, on the court, and in their respective communities.

The Jostens Trophy is a joint creation of Jostens, Inc., of Minneapolis, Minn., and the Rotary Club of Salem, Va. The purpose of the award is to honor the true Division III student-athlete - the athlete that shows excellence in the classroom, on the playing floor and in the community. In addition to the Trophy, the Wooldridge Scholarship, a $1,000 donation, will be presented in the names of the winners to their institutions. The scholarship is named after Dan Wooldridge, a Salem Rotarian and retired Commissioner of the Old Dominion Athletic Conference, as a way of honoring him for his long-time dedication to Division III athletics.

>> Keep Reading



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4. All-Americans


US College Hockey Online (USCHO) has released its 2020 Division III All-America men's team.

First Team
F-Conlan Keenan, Sr., Geneseo
F-Andrew Romano, Sr., Geneseo
F-Conor Landrigan, Jr., Utica
D-Daniel Fritz, Sr., Utica
D-Christian Hausinger, Jr., UW-River Falls
G-Tom Aubrun, Sr., Norwich

Player of the Year: Tom Aubrun, Sr., Norwich, GK
Rookie of the Year: Brandon Osmundson, Fr., Utica, F

>> Complete Team



The American Hockey Coaches Association released its 2020 women's All-America team.

First Team
F-Amanda Conway, Sr., Norwich
F-Emma Crocker, Jr., Elmira
F-Annie Katonka, Jr., Plattsburgh
D-Samantha Benoit, Jr., Norwich
D-Michaela Giuttari, Sr., Hamilton
G-Caitlin Walker, Soph., Amherst

Player of the Year: Amanda Conway, Sr., Norwich, F

>> Complete Team


5.  Comings and Goings


6.  1 Fun Thing

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“Y.M.C.A.” is a member of this year’s class of the National Recording Registry. That’s right, kids – that infectious stand-up-and-boogie disco classic, complete with a singalong chorus and over-the-top enthusiasm for a single-sex gym and fraternal living facility – is now in the official time capsule of American history.

But where did the song come from? How did a giddy tribute to the Young Men’s Christian Association, a religious non-profit founded in 19th-century London, become one of the most instantly recognizable songs in late 20th-century America?

For this, we need to go to the disco-crazed days of winter 1978-79, specifically to New York City’s nightclub and bar scene. “Saturday Night Fever,” set in Brooklyn, had rocked the world year before. Studio 54 reigned supreme for the city’s celebrities. Donna Summer and the Bee Gees ruled pop music. Manhattan’s Greenwich Village was a hotbed of gay life and fashion.

Victor Willis (pictured above as the cop) - Mr. YMCA - agreed to sing lead and background vocals for an unnamed concept band that was the brainchild of Jacques Morali, a French record producer. Morali was gay and loved the flamboyant personalities he’d see at Village nightclubs. He eventually called his project the “Village People,” although Willis was the only person in the group, wasn’t gay and still didn’t live in the Village.

Willis put pen to paper. He imagined a kid, not much different than himself, maybe 20, 21 years old, sitting on the corner of 63rd and Broadway, in front of the Empire. He saw it now from a slightly older perspective, as a guy who could offer advice to a kid like that.

“I imagined somebody coming in town and, you know, maybe having blown all their money or couldn’t afford to go to the five-star hotels,” he says. “They were just sitting there not knowing which way to go with their life. So that was the first line.”

Morali added the music. Horace Ott, a music-industry veteran with a long resume of hits, added the horn and string arrangements, giving the song the punchy blasts that heralded the chorus. It was done."

>> Little Known Fact: Willis was married to Phylicia Ayers-Allen for six years. After divorcing, she married football star Ahmad Rashad, starred as Claire Huxtable in "The Cosby Show" and become a pop-culture icon all her own.

>> No. 2: The song never hit No. 1 on the charts. Who was it behind?

>> Worth Your Time

>> Turn It Up (You Know You Want To)

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Thursday, March 26, 2020

Soccer Rules

D3Playbook
MARCH 26, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

>> Good Thursday Morning!  Disappointed Face on Apple iOS 13.3  Today was supposed to be MLB Opening Day. Sigh.

>> Today's Word Count: 833. Brief, concise. Easy to digest.

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1.  Soccer Rules

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"The NCAA Men’s and Women’s Soccer Rules Committee recommended proposals that would align collegiate soccer more closely with international rules.

The committee, which met via teleconference last week, supported modifications for protocols for goalkeepers during penalty kicks and where attacking players can stand when the defending team has a wall of three or more players during free kicks.

All rules proposals must be approved by the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel, which is scheduled to discuss soccer recommendations April 20."

>> Penalty Kicks: Goalkeepers would be required to have at least part of one foot on or in line with the goal line when the kick is taken. Also, goalkeepers could not be touching the goal posts, crossbar or the net before the kick is taken.

>> Free Kicks: Attacking players would be required to be at least 1 yard from a defending team’s wall of three or more players. Attacking players standing very close to, or in, the defensive wall on free kicks often cause management problems and hurt the pace of play of the match.

>> Keep Reading from the NCAA


2. Endowments, Part III

Does an institution's endowment value indicate success in the Directors' Cup standings?

by Total Endowment (billion)
  1. MIT ($17.569) - 6th place
  2. Chicago ($8.263) - 9th
  3. Washington U. ($7.953) - 3rd
  4. Emory ($7.872) -5th
  5. Johns Hopkins ($6,275) - 2nd
  6. New York U. ($4,345) - 34th
  7. Caltech ($2.975) - 290th
  8. Williams ($2.888) - 1st
  9. Carnegie Mellon ($2.542) - 33rd
  10. Amherst ($2.473) - 8th
by Endowment per Student
  1. Principia ($1,582,250) - 131st place
  2. MIT ($1,533,234) - 6th
  3. Pomona ($1,486.314) - 23rd
  4. Williams ($1,380,957) - 1st
  5. Swarthmore ($1,370,157) - 94th
  6. Amherst ($1,332,588) - 8th
  7. Caltech ($1,332,457) - 290th
  8. Grinnell ($1,224,100) - 116th
  9. Bowdoin ($953,864) - 18th
  10. Wellesley ($912,050) - 133rd
Top Endowment in Conference / Directors Cup Standing
A-R-C: Luther (4th of 5)
ASC: Hardin-Simmons (1st of 5)
CAC: Salisbury (1st of 3)
CCC: Wentworth (6 of 7)
CCIW: Wheaton, Ill. (1st of 9)
Centennial: Johns Hopkins (1st of 11)
CSAC: Cedar Crest (3rd of 3)
E8: Alfred (3rd of 6)
GNAC: Suffolk (3rd of 3)
HCAC: Earlham (6th of 8)
Landmark: Catholic (6th of 7)
Liberty: Vassar (5th of 9)
MAC: Stevens (2nd of 12)
MIAA: Kalamazoo (4th of 6)
MIAC: Carleton (2nd of 11)
Midwest: Grinnell (2nd of 9)
NACC: Illinois Tech (4th of 4)
NCAC: Oberlin (8th of 9)
NESCAC: Williams (1st of 11)
NEWMAC: MIT (1st of 9)
NJAC: Rowan (2nd of 4)
NWC: Whitman (3rd of 7)
OAC: John Carroll (1st of 9)
ODAC: Washington and Lee (1st of 9)
PAC: Washington & Jefferson (1st of 3)
SAA: Berry (3rd of 5)
SCAC: Trinity (1st of 5)
SCIAC: Caltech (9th of 9)
SLIAC: Principia (2nd of 3)
SUNYAC: Oneonta (3rd of 5)
UAA: Chicago (3rd of 8)
USA South: Berea (1st of 9)
 
  • Endowments as of 6/30/19
  • 2018-19 Directors' Cup standings

 
3.  5 Tips to Foster Community
 

by Dennis Hanno, president, Wheaton (Mass.) College
 
"America's smaller colleges and universities, particularly liberal arts colleges, foster a sense of community that is central to their mission. While the current coronavirus crisis presents a challenge to maintaining that sense of community as colleges transition from face-to-face teaching and learning to online education, it is still possible to maintain that sense of community.

Here are a few tips for creating community while going remote:
  1. Be Personal and Human
  2. Emphasize Consistent Communication
  3. Embrace the Technology You Are Comfortable Using
  4. Prioritize Response and Service
  5. Use Whatever Resources You Can, From On- or Off-Campus

>> Bottom Line: "We have faced crises before and colleges and universities have consistently been up to the task meeting them. This situation feels different because its duration and impact are so uncertain. However, every college and university is facing this challenge together and the level of sharing and support for each other has truly been unprecedented."

>> Keep Reading

 

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4.  Calendar
 
Tentative, of course.

April 13-15 - Wrestling Rules Committee, Indianapolis
April 15-16 - Committee on Women's Athletics, Denver, Colo.
April 15-16 - Minority Opportunities and Interest Committee, Denver, Colo.
April 17-19 - NCAA Inclusion Forum, Denver, Colo.
April 18-19 - Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, Indianapolis
April 20-21 - Management Council, Indianapolis
April 28-29 - Presidents Council, Indianapolis

 

5.  Comings and Goings
 

 
6.  1 Dance Thing


 
 
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Wednesday, March 25, 2020

The Decision

D3Playbook
MARCH 25, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy D3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Wednesday morning! 

>> Today's Word Count: 1,364. An easy morning read with lots of great information.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 

1. The Decision
 
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by Jessica Huntley, Commissioner, Atlantic East Conference
Editor's NoteD3Playbook asked Ms. Huntley if she could document the steps and discussions that occurred along the way as the Atlantic East made its decision to suspend the athletic season.

"Let me start by stating that my heart breaks for our student-athletes, coaches, staff and fans. The decisions and actions that have taken place over the last two weeks have been some of the hardest decisions we may ever have to make as a conference. But in the end, we all must do our part to help end the spread of the coronavirus.

The conversation regarding COVID-19 in the Atlantic East began on Friday, March 6, with a call of the Executive Board Chair and myself. At that point, it was an opportunity for us to touch base about a few items and to let him know that the athletic directors and I were beginning to put together a contingency plan.

On Tuesday, March 10, we had an Administrative Council conference call. It was a very quiet conversation, because COVID-19 information was rapidly changing and it was hard for all of us to wrap our heads around contingency plans when we knew things were changing so quickly.

After that call was over, I sent a few plans I had received from other conferences for them to review and provide feedback. We also started a Google drive document to keep everyone posted on the ever-evolving situations on each of our campuses – which school was moving online, what activities were being cancelled, and the timelines proposed by each institution.

Throughout this time period, my biggest resource was the other 45 Division III Conference Commissioners. They were the group to get the conversation started about contingency plans. They were the group to share what schools and conferences were doing in real time. It was extremely helpful information for me to be able to share with my ADs and Presidents during these uncharted waters.

On Wednesday, March 11, we scheduled a conference call with all ADs and Presidents for Friday. By the time the call had come, many of our schools had taken steps to move to online learning and cancel activities for the time being. The original sentiment around the “room” was maybe there is hope for us to return to play before the spring semester ends, but by the end of the call reality started to set in for many of the folks on the call. With the NCAA canceling all winter and spring championships the afternoon before, it was hard not to discuss cancellation as an option for us as well.

The other thing to remember in all of this is that each location of the Atlantic East schools were getting hit by COVID-19 at different times, so some campuses were feeling its affects more quickly than others. At the end of the call on March 13, there were a few that saw cancelling inevitable, while others remained hopeful. In the end, we agreed to a two-week postponement of all conference play.

By Tuesday, March 17, things had drastically changed for some of our campuses and after a quick phone call with two Presidents there was an email vote to move to a cancelled spring season and championships. In the email vote, Presidents' emotions over this difficult decision came through. The decision was made quickly and unanimously. It was the right decision for the health and safety of our athletes, staff, campus communities, and the world at-large, albeit extremely difficult.

I sent out the press release that evening to our administrative staff members and communication directors for a release at Noon on Wednesday, March 18. By that time, the majority of Division III Conferences had cancelled as well, so I don’t think it surprised many people; however, the pain, frustration and sadness still hit.

Spring 2020 will not soon be forgotten. And my heart goes out to all of the spring athletes, especially the seniors."

 
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2.  Endowments, Part III

Northern Athletics
  1. Illinois Tech ($236,687)
  2. Concordia, Wisconsin ($88,859)
  3. Dominican ($40,445)
  4. Wisconsin Lutheran ($36,629)
North Coast
  1. Oberlin ($943,469)
  2. Denison ($877,592)
  3. DePauw ($730,341)
  4. Kenyon ($422,019)
  5. Wabash ($344,252)
  6. Wooster ($328,921)
  7. Ohio Wesleyan ($243,083)
  8. Allegheny ($230,453)
  9. Wittenberg ($119,174)
NESCAC
  1. Williams ($2,888,962)
  2. Amherst ($2,473,283)
  3. Tufts ($1,867,962 / $169,707 per student)
  4. Bowdoin ($1,743,663)
  5. Middlebury ($1,157,786)
  6. Wesleyan ($1,004,806)
  7. Hamilton ($969,362)
  8. Colby ($869,927)
  9. Trinity ($623,153)
  10. Bates ($329,723)
  11. Connecticut College ($313,510)
NEWMAC
  1. MIT ($17,569,328 / $1,533,234 per student)
  2. Wellesley ($2,173,415)
  3. Smith ($1,913,253)
  4. Mount Holyoke ($794,204)
  5. WPI ($528,287)
  6. Babson ($457,670)
  7. Clark ($438,767)
  8. Wheaton ($212,982)
  9. Springfield ($77,932)
NJAC
  1. Rutgers ($1,476,072 / $23,767 per student)
  2. Rowan ($232,094)
  3. Montclair State ($79,490)
  4. TCNJ ($32,189)
  5. Ramapo ($21,364)
Northwest
  1. Whitman ($565,256)
  2. Puget Sound ($380,507)
  3. Willamette ($262,124)
  4. Lewis & Clark ($246,794)
  5. Whitworth ($156,048)
  6. Linfield ($108,080)
  7. Pacific ($71,234)
Ohio
  1. John Carroll ($223,539)
  2. Baldwin Wallace ($179,533)
  3. Ohio Northern ($160,300)
  4. Mount Union ($140,318)
  5. Capital ($106,663)
  6. Otterbein ($101,386)
  7. Marietta ($88,469)
  8. Muskingum ($79,461)
  9. Heidelberg ($51,987)
  Old Dominion
  1. Washington and Lee ($1,676,308)
  2. Hollins ($182,729)
  3. Hampden-Sydney ($177,827)
  4. Roanoke ($148,794)
  5. Lynchburg ($112,879)
  6. Bridgewater ($95,758)
  7. Guilford ($78,308)
  8. Shenandoah ($68,105)
  9. Ferrum ($53,517)
Southern Athletic
  1. Berry ($1,058,605)
  2. Sewanee ($408,769)
  3. Rhodes ($352,206)
  4. Centre ($329,270)
  5. Hendrix ($200,680)
Southern Collegiate
  1. Trinity ($1,280,248 / $516,646 per student)
  2. Colorado College ($766,910)
  3. Southwestern ($296,413)
  4. Austin ($149,667)
  5. Texas Lutheran ($94,530)
SCIAC
  1. Caltech ($2,975,376 / $1,332,457 per student)
  2. Pomona ($2,324,594)
  3. Claremont McKenna ($865,475)
  4. Occidental ($448,095)
  5. Chapman ($417,705)
  6. Scripps ($375,585)
  7. Harvey Mudd ($328,568)
  8. Redlands ($182,278)
  9. Pitzer ($144,365)
  10. Whittier ($112,868)
  11. La Verne ($111,994)
  12. Cal Lutheran ($108,602)
SUNYAC
  1. Oneonta ($51,718)
  2. Cortland ($47,652)
  3. Oswego ($41,850)
  4. Fredonia ($38,955)
  5. Plattsburgh ($21,695)
UAA
  1. Chicago ($8,263,868)
  2. Washington U. ($7,953,986)
  3. Emory ($7,872,381)
  4. New York U. ($4,345,608)
  5. Carnegie Mellon ($2,542,650)
  6. Rochester ($2,239,720)
  7. Case Western ($1,866,500)
  8. Brandeis ($1,073,526)
USA South
  1. Berea ($1,218,740)
  2. Agnes Scott ($217,142)
  3. Meredith ($114,786)
  4. LaGrange ($53,005)
  5. William Peace ($50,022)
  6. Covenant ($42,681)
  7. Mary Baldwin ($30,179)
  8. Brevard ($28,160)
  9. Averett ($21,268)

>> Tomorrow: Does endowment size lead to greater Directors Cup performance?

NOTE: Apologies to Cornell College for mistaking listing it with the A-R-C yesterday, rather than the Midwest Conference.
 

 

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3.  Honored

The winter sports season ended sooner than anyone in Division III wanted ... but it's still time to look back and recognize outstanding performers during the 2019-20 season.

D3hoops.com Player of the Year (M)
Nate West, Letourneau

D3hoops.com Rookie of the Year (M)
Vinny DeAngelo, Swarthmore

>> Men's Team

D3hoops.com Player of the Year (W)
Erica DeCandido, Tufts

D3hoops.com Rookie of the Year (W)
Aaliyah Hampton, Berea

>> Women's Team

USCHO.com Player of the Year (M)
Tom Aubrun, Norwich

>> Story

NCAA.com Most Dominant Wrestler
Troy Stanich, Stevens

>> Story

 
4.  Comings and Goings
 
 
5.  1 Sleep Thing

Not exactly social distancing ... but still very cute and what we need for a Wednesday morning.

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