Friday, March 20, 2020

#UnitedAsOne

D3Playbook
MARCH 20, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Friday Morning!  It's a good time to take stock of all that's good in your life. We'll get through this. Promise.

>> Today's Word Count: 1,602. Smart, concise. An informative read that's just over 6 minutes.

>> Coming Next Week: A look at endowments at Division III institutions. An important read at an important time.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1. #UnitedAsOne

Image

"The #UnitedAsOne campaign, created and led by NCAA member schools, started to form less than 24 hours after the remaining NCAA winter and spring championships were canceled due to the evolving global health threat surrounding COVID-19.
Unity, at an unprecedented time, became a rallying cry among the membership of more than 1,100 schools and nearly 500,000 student-athletes across three divisions. It started small. A group of about 50 digital and social media creatives within different athletics departments began direct messaging each other on Twitter on Friday.
“What’s next?”
“What can we do?”
“What should we do?”
Quickly, the consensus became to find a way to come together, to show unity and support within college athletics during a trying time for everyone in the country. That evolved into the #UnitedAsOne campaign, which officially launched at 4:16 p.m. Eastern time Thursday, exactly a week after the announcement of the NCAA canceling the remaining 2019-20 winter and spring championships."

>> Why It Matters: "“All of our programs, all of our student-athletes, our coaching staffs, we’re all in the same boat here. This is certainly something to show that we’re all in this together.” - Brian Wagner, Michigan’s digital strategy and creative lead

>> The Big Picture: “I’m just happy that everyone is united around this cause and around this opportunity to show that we are arm in arm, ready to see what happens next. Everyone’s united and supporting each other and putting rivalries aside, putting their feelings for lost seasons aside and really thinking about the big picture and how we can all support each other.” - Marc Jordan, assistant director of social and digital strategy at Texas

>> Read More

 
2.  Stress Test


by Rick Seltzer, InsideHigherEd.com

"How hard is the new coronavirus outbreak hitting college and university finances?

It’s actually not the most urgent question at the moment for many college leaders who have been scrambling with clearing out campuses, mass migrations to online or remote learning delivery, and various other steps that need to be taken to minimize harm from the spread of COVID-19. They’re doing what they have to do in a crisis, and they’ll tally up the bill later.

But the question still looms over everything colleges are doing. The U.S. higher education system had already been showing signs of stress, including relatively flat net tuition revenue at many institutions, a lack of growth projected among the high school graduates that make up the bulk of students and anemic growth in lucrative international enrollments in recent years. Now add to the mix the sudden operational jolts and likely global recession being prompted by the pandemic.

Colleges and universities will be paying a set of short-term costs, according to higher education leaders and financial experts interviewed both on the record and on a condition of background. Those experts are divided over the significance of those costs, however."

>> Of Note: "It’s not the worst time for these additional expenses to be adding up. Many colleges have already collected the bulk of the money they’ll receive for the 2019-20 fiscal year as students paid tuition and fees. And the campus closures come early enough that expenses can be cut if need be. And the spring is packed with costly events at many colleges and universities. Commencement costs money to stage. So do alumni reunions and parties for seniors. The smaller an institution, the higher the relative cost may be."

>> What's Next: "It’s hard for institutions to reduce their cost of labor. Yes, staff members and some faculty members might be able to be laid off or furloughed. But that’s impossible in some cases without a declaration of financial exigency. And in a high-touch industry like higher education, it can also erode an institution’s ability to deliver a quality education for its students -- especially with a mass migration to remote learning under way."

>> Reality Check: The length of the coronavirus disruption means everything - "if large gatherings are banned for only a few more weeks before the economy comes roaring back, it’s likely to be good for donations, endowments and family finances. If the pandemic grows and people grow more and more isolated in their homes, the psychological and personal finance aspects grow more and more important."

>> Quotable: “The unknown length of this is very unsettling to everyone, especially to families. You listen to economic experts brazenly say the financial stress is going to be very short-lived, and as soon as the virus is conquered, it’s going to come raging back and we're going to have this healthy economy. Maybe, and maybe not.” - Beth Paul, president of Capital University and future president of Nazareth College.

>> Coming next week: Our look at endowments around Division III.

>> Go Deeper

 


3.  WBCA All-America
 

Image

"Maddie Hasson of Bowdoin College is the 2020 WBCA NCAA Division III Player of the Year and headlines the 2020 WBCA NCAA Division III Coaches’ All-America team, announced by the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association Thursday.

The WBCA presents the Player of the Year award annually to the top player in five of the six WBCA membership divisions (NCAA Divisions II, and III, NAIA, two-year college and high school). The Player of the Year and the 10-member Coaches’ All-America team in each division are selected by a committee of WBCA member coaches in that division."

First Team
  • Taite Anderson, Bethel
  • Erica DeCandido, Tufts
  • Hannah Fox, Amherst
  • Maddie Hasson, Bowdoin
  • Hallee Hoeppner, UW-Eau Claire
  • Raenett Hughes, Texas-Dallas
  • Sydney Kopp, DePauw
  • Katie McShea, Marymount
  • Kenedy Schoonveld, Hope
  • Leah Springer, Messiah

>> Complete Team
 

 
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4. COVID-19 vs. the Sports Media Business
 
by Dylan Byers, NBC News

"In the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, the American television industry may soon be forced to reckon with the possibility that its entire business model could collapse due to the indefinite suspension of live sports. This seemingly far-fetched scenario will only become more likely the longer the outbreak lasts.

Television's stranglehold on sports rights is one of the last things keeping it alive as consumers cut the cord and flock to digital services. A long-term absence of live sports, especially the NFL, could lead to a breakdown in the agreements between sports leagues, broadcasters and distributors and shake the industry to its foundation.

Without sports, and especially without football, fewer consumers would pay for television (too expensive, why not sign up for Netflix?). Distributors would pay significantly less for networks like CBS and ESPN (why should they pay hundreds of millions of dollars every month just for SportsCenter?). The entire television business could, over time, collapse."

>> Reality Check: "As part of their legal arrangements, sports leagues are contractually obligated to provide broadcasters with a certain number of live sporting events. The broadcasters, in turn, are contractually obligated to provide a certain number of hours of live sports to the distributors. In a world without sports, that becomes impossible."

>> Be Smart: "If the sports suspension continues to the point where the parties fall into breach of contract, distributors could renege on agreements with broadcasters, and broadcasters could renege on agreements with the leagues. The parties might also invoke a "force majeure" clause allowing them to void contracts due to uncontrollable circumstances." And where is the NCAA then?

>> The Final Word: Does the coronavirus pandemic last so long that it forces the NFL to cancel its 2020-2021 season? If that happens, the television industry should brace for radical change.

>> Go Deeper

 
5.  Comings and Goings
 
 
6.  1 Marble Thing


Source: Jelle's Marble Runs (YouTube)

The global sports outage has presented a unique opportunity for Jelle's Marble Runs and its YouTube-based racing league, "Marbula One."
  • By the numbers: "In just three days, the league has seen its followers on Instagram and Twitter double [and] views on YouTube shoot up by 339%," writes Front Office Sports' Emily Caron.
  • The backdrop: Jelle's Marble Runs began in 2006 and has blossomed into an astonishingly well-oiled machine, with announcers and home tracks for each team.
This week's race: The 2020 Greenstone GP, the fifth race of the 2020 Marbula One season, has 23 turns and is one of the longest tracks on the calendar.

Screenshot: Jelle's Marble Runs (YouTube)
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Thursday, March 19, 2020

Extra Flexibility

D3Playbook
MARCH 19, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

>> Good Thursday Morning!  Is there good news? Yes. Welcome Spring!

>> Today's Word Count: 1,019. Brief, concise. Easy to digest.

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 
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1.  Extra Flexibility Granted to DIII Schools
 
After the NCAA announced the cancellation of all remaining winter and spring championships in response to the evolving COVID-19 public health threat, the Division III Administrative Committee approved measures giving schools additional flexibility when it comes to student-athletes, as well as participation and membership requirements.
Along with its decision to cancel the winter and spring championships, the NCAA Board of Governors last week directed all three divisions to enact legislative modifications and waivers to provide relief to student-athletes and schools impacted by COVID-19.
The Division III measures approved on Friday, March 13, include an additional semester and season of eligibility for all student-athletes participating in spring sports, the removal of a minimum threshold of sponsored spring sports, and the flexibility for schools to assist students with travel, lodging and meals as a result of campus displacement.
No actions were taken with regard to additional recruiting restrictions, as Division III does not have specific recruiting periods.

>> Quotable: “While these measures won’t cover all circumstances, they were taken with the best interest of student-athletes in mind. During these extraordinarily difficult times, conferences and institutions should not focus on the application of NCAA legislation, but rather the health and well-being of student-athletes.” - Tori Murden McClure, president of Spalding University and chair of the Administrative Committee.

>> Keep Reading

 

2. More Trouble Ahead
 

"Many colleges have responded to the coronavirus by moving online and sending students home, which will immediately impact revenue streams, according to Moody's.
There's great variety among institutions in how they'll be able to weather this storm. However, more than 30 percent of public universities are running with operating deficits, and more than 15 percent have less than 90 days of cash on hand, which puts them in particular risk.
It's quite possible higher education could face disruption in enrollment, state funding, endowment income and research grants. However, if the economy returns to normal after the outbreak is contained and enrollment stays steady in the fall, these predictions could be reversed.
If disruption from the coronavirus continues into the fall, it's possible some colleges would declare fiscal exigency, according to Moody's. This rarely used mechanism lets colleges facing severe financial difficulties quickly address fixed costs, like tenure."

- courtesy of InsideHigherEd.com

 
3.  Cap and Gone?
 
Division III institutions are beginning to come around to the realization that holding Commencement ceremonies this spring is becoming increasingly unlikely.

Here are some institutions that have already postponed:
  • Allegheny
  • Anderson
  • Benedictine
  • Berea
  • Emory
  • Franklin & Marshall
  • Grinnell
  • Guilford
  • Ithaca
  • LeTourneau
  • Lynchburg
  • Nichols
  • North Central (Ill.)
  • Oneonta
  • RIT
  • Smith
  • Sul Ross State
  • Washington U.

This is not intended to be a complete list.

 

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4.  Hoop, There It Is
 


The National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) announced today the 2020 NABC Coaches’ Division III All-America teams. Selected and voted on by member coaches of the NABC in NCAA Division III, these student-athletes represent the most outstanding basketball players across America in their division.

 
5.  One Perspective


by Emma Gaston

"The week the coronavirus changed life as we know it was unlike anything I had ever expected. It was then that I learned my sophomore softball season at Salem College—a season I had fought so long and hard to participate in—was over due to concerns surrounding the virus' recent worldwide outbreak.

03/12/20 6:45 p.m. ET: Our coach gathered us for a talk after practice and told us that our season had been postponed until at least April 13. I watched the tears come down the faces of our seniors and I couldn’t hold back my own tears, either. No one in a million years could have predicted that something like this would happen, and I only wished there was something I could do to make things better for my teammates.

03/13/20: Shortly after arriving home, I received the news I desperately did not want to hear: Our conference—USA South—had canceled all spring sports. I couldn’t imagine the pain my teammates were feeling. We had just tied the program’s longest winning streak at nine games. We had faced so much adversity and worked so hard for us to only play 14 games. I was devastated.

>> Situational Awareness: "The NCAA announced that all Division I, II and III spring student-athletes will receive an extra year of eligibility for losing this season. While this is good news for many people, it does not work for everyone, and especially Division III athletes. Since we don't receive athletic scholarships, paying for another year of school is not plausible for all impacted student-athletes."

>> Worth Noting: "While softball has been a huge part of my life for 11 years, it cannot be my entire life. I am a Division III student-athlete who has never been helped financially to play the sport I love, and I'm paying the same loans as everybody else who attends my college. To be honest, I don't know what the coronavirus' impact will mean for the future of my softball career."

>> Read Emma's timeline

6.  Comings and Goings
 

 
7.  Pic du Jour

Cherry blossoms
Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade in D.C. may be canceled, but nature isn't.
  • Peak bloom is expected between Saturday and next Tuesday (March 21–24).

 
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Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Insurance Won't Cover Losses

D3Playbook
MARCH 18, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy D3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Wednesday morning! On behalf of Bills fans everywhere, adios GOAT!

>> Today's Word Count: 707. An easy morning read. 

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please recommend us to a friend or co-worker. Or share with your staff and bring them up-to-speed on what's happening in DIII.

 

1. Insurance Won't Cover Losses
 
March is without the Madness this year.
by Steve Berkowitz and Dan Wolken, USA TODAY

"Major-college athletics directors are planning on the NCAA not being able to cover all of the revenue it will lose because of the cancellation of the Division I men’s basketball tournament due to the coronavirus outbreak, six ADs and college sports administrators have told USA TODAY.

That is likely to result in a reduction of the association’s scheduled distribution of $600 million to Division I schools and conferences this spring, the ADs and administrators said. How much of a reduction is still to be determined, and that will depend on the association’s ability to tap its reserves and borrow money.

The ADs and administrators spoke on the condition of anonymity because the financial details are still being worked out.

“The economics of all this could definitely be extensive,” one AD said."

>> Situational Awareness: "The association has $250 million to $275 million in business-interruption insurance connected to the tournament, the ADs and administrators have been told, but it is unclear how quickly that money would come to the NCAA – or how much. These types of insurance claims can bog down in a variety of disputes, and catastrophic-event insurance markets are likely to be under stress because of the global pandemic."

>> Worth Noting: "From 2004 through 2014, the NCAA accumulated nearly $400 million in a fund that was created as a reserve against the possibility of a massive loss of revenue from the tournament. However, at the direction of its governing board of college presidents, the NCAA distributed that money to schools to help them with increasing costs and spent it on their behalf in other ways, including a $208.7 million legal settlement."

>> Keep Reading

 
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2.  NCAA Goes Remote

"Due to the evolving COVID-19 public health situation, the NCAA national office will suspend normal building operations in Indianapolis from Wednesday, March 18, through at least Friday, April 3. All other operations will continue as the NCAA national office staff works remotely. NCAA employees will continue to be accessible through regular communication channels. The length of the suspension will be evaluated on an ongoing basis."

 

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3.  Admissions Fears

by Scott Jaschik, InsideHigherEd.com
 
Admissions officers are deeply worried about the potential impact of the coronavirus on enrollment, a new survey suggests.

Asked to rank their prospects for the yield -- the percentage of admitted applicants who will enroll -- 43 percent of enrollment leaders answered 5, on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the worst. And 32 percent answered 4.

Those are among the answers to a survey released by EAB on Tuesday on admissions in the era of the coronavirus.

>> Go Deeper

 
4.  1 Democracy Thing



Many of China's measures to combat the coronavirus aren't authoritarian: They are the kind of total social mobilization that happens during war, Axios China reporter Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian writes.
  • Why it matters: Democracies are perfectly capable of taking extreme measures when necessary.
Reality check: Citywide quarantines, travel restrictions and obsessive public health checks aren't authoritarian. They're the kind of total mobilization that happens during major national crises such as war, regardless of the system of government.
Democracies have a long history of successful mobilization, and they have mechanisms that both enable extreme policies and bring them to an end when they are no longer needed, to prevent authoritarian creep.
  • During World War II, the U.S. was initially paralyzed by a domestic debate about whether to get involved at all, said Maury Klein, the author of "A Call to Arms: Mobilizing America for World War II," in an interview with Axios.
  • "Things always move slower in a democracy," said Klein, because the various moving parts of government and society must first reach consensus.
What to watch: Fundamental questions about the health of our governance today and the effectiveness of our leadership suggest the United States may not rise to the occasion as well as it did almost 80 years ago.

- courtesy of Axios

 
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