Tuesday, March 24, 2020

The Hierarchy of Higher Ed

D3Playbook
MARCH 24, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
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1.  The Hierarchy of Higher Ed

by Karin Fischer, Chronicle of Higher Education

"Lee, an administrative assistant at a small private college in the Northeast, awoke last Monday morning to an email that made her feel “angry and not terribly valued.” It was from the human-resources department, instructing all staff members to “report to campus as regularly scheduled” despite the coronavirus outbreak.

The college had taken health and safety precautions, the email said, and with no students or faculty members on campus, the risk of exposure was low. Workers who needed to stay at home with children or at-risk relatives were told to use vacation or sick time.

Her direct supervisor was flexible, Lee said, but she wondered why she needed to be in the office. Most of her job was done by email, and there would be little foot traffic. As a staff member, Lee said, it was hard not to feel that “our health and safety are being taken less seriously, that we’re being treated as expendable.”

Even as classes have moved online and students and professors have been told to stay off their campuses, many staff members have been expected to report to work as usual. Custodians and cafeteria workers, security guards and residence-life staff members, librarians and IT specialists — they do jobs deemed essential to helping colleges navigate the abrupt transition to online teaching and to supporting those students who remain on campus. If they didn’t clock in, could colleges continue to run?"

>> Situational Awareness: "The coronavirus outbreak underscores what many see as a pre-existing labor divide on campuses, where the rules that apply to those who teach in the classroom don’t always extend to those who mop the floors or serve the meals. For now, at least, the support staff of the knowledge class is reporting to work."

>> Reality Check: "On Thursday members of the staff received an email from the university that they may have been exposed to Covid-19 by someone in an adjoining office who was exhibiting symptoms. Still, the email said, they should come into work after the building had been specially cleaned. Alison, a mental health provider at a university in Colorado, and her colleagues refused. “None of us feels OK with that,” she said. After they pushed back, administrators agreed to ask just a skeleton crew to report in. But Alison said it shouldn’t have taken a co-worker’s falling ill to put safeguards in place for staff members. “The hierarchy of higher ed — it’s infuriating,” she said.

>> What They're Saying: “It can feel like the administration doesn’t care about the people making the wheels turn at the university.”

 
2.  Endowments, Part II
 
Yesterday, we explained endowments and showed some of the top endowments in the country - both total and per student.

Today, we look at the disparity amongst conferences when it comes to endowments. Essentially, who has the money and who does not. Often times, that indicates who has the biggest voice in the room ... and determines who makes the decisions and who does not.

Results taken from 2019 NACUBO-TIAA Study of Endowments that were released on January 30, 2020. All figures in 000s.

American Rivers
  1. Luther ($168,780)
  2. Dubuque ($160,530)
  3. Buena Vista ($136,568)
  4. Central ($79,161)
  5. Cornell College ($76,288)
  6. Loras ($41,584)
American Southwest
  1. Hardin-Simmons ($194,708)
  2. U. of the Ozarks ($115,068)
  3. McMurry ($94,536)
  4. Howard Payne ($62,865)
  5. LeTourneau ($22,055)
Centennial
  1. Johns Hopkins ($6,275,939 / $335,021 per student)
  2. Swarthmore ($2,131,553 / $1,370,157)
  3. Bryn Mawr ($907,976)
  4. Haverford ($529,487)
  5. Dickinson ($455,442)
  6. Franklin & Marshall ($354,783)
  7. Gettysburg ($330,714)
  8. Muhlenberg ($288,974)
  9. Washington College ($236,685)
  10. McDaniel ($134,764)
  11. Ursinus ($131,213)
College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin
  1. Wheaton, Ill. ($503,366)
  2. Illinois Wesleyan ($206,191)
  3. Augustana ($172,846)
  4. North Central ($118,586)
  5. Elmhurst ($112,339)
  6. Carthage ($111,496)
  7. Millikin ($106,893)
  8. North Park ($79,527)
  9. Carroll ($71,164)
Commonwealth Coast
  1. Wentworth ($116,142)
  2. Curry ($103,667)
  3. Endicott ($95,673)
  4. Roger Williams ($86,049)
  5. Salve Regina ($63,790)
  6. Western New England ($56,683)
  7. Nichols ($17,345)
Empire 8
  1. Alfred ($138,254)
  2. St. John Fisher ($97,743)
  3. Hartwick ($76,792)
  4. Nazareth ($71,318)
  5. Houghton ($57,372)
  6. Sage ($38,937)
  7. Utica ($24,796)
Heartland
  1. Earlham ($418,845)
  2. Rose-Hulman ($214,555)
  3. Transylvania ($191,238)
  4. Hanover ($146,078)
  5. Franklin ($87,387)
  6. Manchester ($64,470)
  7. Mount St. Joseph ($59,654)
  8. Defiance ($19,129)
Landmark
  1. Catholic ($273,685 / $56,746 per student)
  2. Scranton ($209,760 / $42,393)
  3. Goucher ($203,430 / $113,142)
  4. Drew ($183,108)
  5. Susquehanna ($173,197)
  6. Juniata ($120,223)
  7. Elizabethtown ($83,797)
Liberty
  1. Vassar ($1,117,380 / $457,567 per student)
  2. RIT ($944,883 / $61,360)
  3. Rensselaer ($739,648 / $92,897)
  4. Union ($466,372 / $212,084)
  5. Skidmore ($384,280)
  6. Ithaca ($347,335)
  7. St. Lawrence ($315,661)
  8. Hobart and William Smith ($229,107)
  9. Clarkson ($201,698)
Middle Atlantic
  1. Stevens ($224,304)
  2. Messiah ($141,904)
  3. Hood ($106,905)
  4. Widener ($94,454)
  5. DeSales ($91,841)
  6. Fairleigh Dickinson ($91,625)
  7. Arcadia ($82,645)
  8. Albright ($77,103)
  9. Lebanon Valley ($71,832)
  10. Misericordia ($54,532)
  11. Wilkes ($54,044)
  12. Delaware Valley ($33,623)
Michigan
  1. Kalamazoo ($204,344)
  2. Hope ($232,249)
  3. Saint Mary's ($201,649)
  4. Calvin ($176,538)
  5. Albion ($161,113)
  6. Olivet ($42,292)
Minnesota
  1. Carleton ($892,353)
  2. Macalester ($770,782)
  3. St. Olaf ($544,840)
  4. St. Thomas ($540,611)
  5. Saint John's ($208,738)
  6. Gustavus Adolphus ($203,365)
  7. Concordia ($143,479)
  8. Hamline ($100,550)
  9. Saint Benedict ($83,506)
  10. Saint Mary's ($61,788)
  11. Augsburg ($50,786)
Midwest
  1. Grinnell ($2,069,953)
  2. Lawrence ($356,958)
  3. Knox ($170,174)
  4. St. Norbert ($150,476)
  5. Illinois College ($129,905)
  6. Beloit ($114,121)
  7. Ripon ($94,328)
  8. Lake Forest ($90,630)

>> Tomorrow: Conferences N-W

NOTE: not every school submitted its figures to the NACUBO survey. Conferences included if four or more members participated in the survey.

 

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3.  Final Polls 
 

 
    4.  Comings and Goings
     

     
    5. 1 Helpful Thing 

    Photo: Charles Krupa/AP
    In this bleakest of times, Christmas lights in spring have become a thing, AP's Holly Ramer reports.
    • They're wrapped around a tree trunk in Colorado, fashioned into a heart in Alabama and hung high over Main Street in Farmington, New Hampshire. (above).
    Julie Check turned on the white lights that trace the roofline of her home in Eastman, Wisconsin.
    • "We live out in the country, but I know you can see them from the highway," she said. "Anything I can do to make people happy right now, I'm going to try to do."


     
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