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Tuesday, December 22, 2020

Thank You

 


PRESENTED BY THE CITY OF SALEM
"Virginia's Championship City"

D3Playbook

DECEMBER 22, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

 
>> Good Tuesday Morning. We thank you for your support of D3Playbook and wish you and yours a safe, happy and healthy holiday season. Unless there is breaking news, we'll return on January 4.

>> Today's Word Count: 1,236 or as we like to say, five minutes

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Remember to follow us on Twitter @D3Playbook for the latest news and transactions

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook

EDITORIAL

1.  Thank You

 

This is a heartfelt thank you for your support of D3Playbook during the past year. I began this newsletter in August 2019 with the goal of keeping you - the decision-makers in Division III - apprised of what drives the day. You have responded. D3Playbook began the year with 498 subscribers - we currently have 1,563.

Thanks to the City of Salem and Chi Alpha Sigma for your financial support. If you have a business and would like to reach an affluent audience that works in higher education and college sports ... drop us a line at d3playbook@gmail.com.

When I read about the push by Division I to play games at the expense of students' health ... or the lack of access to championship tournaments (see College Football Playoff) ... or how money pays such a huge role (uh, see CFP again) ... I'm reminded of why I was drawn to Division III in the first place. Non-scholarship athletics. Students who participate in athletics. For the love of the game.

Win your conference for access to the national championship tournament. Don't depend on the "committee" and the "eye test." DI committees would have omitted Albertus Magnus men's basketball in 2015 because it wasn't a member of a "power conference." I'll always think of that team when we have these discussions.

I reflect on the people - especially those I have met along the way. Andy, Brad, Keri, Dwayne, Terry, Ken, Dan, Jenn ... you all have a special place in my heart - but a special spot remains for JD, Megan, Kim, Jess, Katie and Jess. They made my DIII experience memorable and extremely rewarding. 

Here's hoping that you remember those that made your DIII experience unforgettable this holiday season and that you and your family have a safe, happy and healthy Christmas and best wishes for a much better 2021 for all.

 

TOP STORY
 
2.  College Basketball Should Stop


by Nathan Kalman-Lamb, Derek Silva, Johanna Mellis, TIME
 

"This month, two men’s college basketball coaches finally had gumption to publicly address a question on many of our minds: why are unpaid athletes risking their health and safety to play games during a pandemic, especially as COVID-cases, and deaths, rise across the country?

“One of the things that has come about with all of this since everything happened in March when the season was canceled, I don’t think anyone can say anymore that these young men are amateurs,” University of Pittsburgh coach Jeff Capel said. “That’s out the window. They’re not. They absolutely aren’t.”

What do they get? An education at some of the world’s most expensive institutions, though many athletes are encouraged not to enroll in majors that are ‘too hard’ or classes that interfere with all-important practice. Capel’s statement matters since it comes from a coach, one of the primary beneficiaries of college basketball’s rigged economy. When one of the cartel’s key stakeholders makes such an admission, then, you know we’re staring at a potentially transformational shift in the dynamics of college athletics."

>> The Big Picture: "In the same moment that public health officials have warned against holiday travel for fear of vectoring another COVID-19 wave around the country, college basketball teams have been doing the exact opposite: hopping on planes to do precisely what we have all been warned not to. Unsurprisingly, just as the nation’s numbers soar, so too have recent team-wide outbreaks in the world of men’s college basketball. On Dec. 17, for example, University of Houston coach Kelvin Sampson said all 15 players on his team had COVID-19. Capel’s comment underline the hypocrisy inherent in asking campus athletic workers to risk their lives to entertain the masses."

>> A Thought-Provoking Piece

 

NCAA

3. In-N-Out

 

The announcements continue as the Colonial States Athletic Conference, Illinois Tech and St. Norbert opted out, while the Heartland Collegiate Athletic and Empire 8 Conferences appeared to move forward.

The CSAC announced that formal conference competition and conference championships for fall and winter sports shall be cancelled for the 2020-21 academic year. Institutions are granted autonomy regarding practice and competition. Illinois Tech has opted out of fall and winter athletic competition in 2020-21, while St. Norbert will not participate in the 2020-21 men's and women's hockey season.

On the flip side, the HCAC and Empire 8 announced their intentions to conduct play in the winter. The HCAC confirmed its earlier decision to continue to move forward with plans to resume conference play in 2021. The sports of men’s and women’s basketball will begin conference play in mid-January. The E8 released its fall and winter sports schedules.
 


A MESSAGE FROM THE CITY OF SALEM

 

The City of Salem and Salem Parks & Recreation along with other localities in the Roanoke Valley host a variety of softball and baseball tournaments throughout the year. We work with Roanoke County, Roanoke City, Botetourt County and the Roanoke Valley Convention and Visitor's Bureau. USA, NSA, USSSA, Got Game, Softball Nations, Freedom Sports and ISF are organizations that bring tournaments to the Roanoke Valley.

Find out more at SalemChampionships.com


 
#whyD3

4.  Following in Dad's Footsteps

by Kevin Callahan, City of Basketball Love


"Bernie Rogers is the son of an Ursinus College point guard. He also plays at The Haverford School for a former star point guard for the Bears.

Extending the connection, the heady and hard working senior point guard committed to play at Lycoming College for another former Ursinus star point guard.

It seems natural for him to play for Mike McGarvey, the Lycoming head coach, since Rogers’ father, Bernie Rogers, also was a standout point guard at Ursinus.

McGarvey flourished at Ursinus from 2002 to 2006. A decade earlier, the elder Rogers paced the Bears in scoring and assists for four straight seasons, scoring over 1,000 points. He was the team MVP in 1994 and 1995, while a two-time All-Conference selection at the Collegeville, Pa., school."

>> Situational Awareness: "The elder Rogers, a first team All-Catholic selection at Archbishop Ryan in 1992, coached his alma mater for 15 seasons before leaving for The Haverford School five years ago. He coached his brother Andrew, who was recruited to play at University of Maine, while at Ryan, so he has endured the recruiting challenge on a personal level."

>> Quotable: “I think having played Division III and coached Division III and my son having followed my camps the past 20 years, I think he is a kid who gets how good Division III is,” Rogers’ father added. “Some kids, it takes a while to realize that and I think he understands that going in, how competitive it is and how blessed you are to have a spot on a team the next four years.”

>> A Good Read

 

Subscribe to d3Playbook
TRANSACTIONS

5.  Comings and Goings
 
 
LAST WORD

6.  1 Christmas Movie Thing


Most popular Christmas movies


It's Christmas week and all through the house, not a creature was stirring, because they were streaming a movie on TV.

But what's the best Christmas movie? Is it really Die Hard?

Consumer site Comparitech set out to uncover the most popular Christmas movie in every state.

And the winner is ... 

Have a safe, happy and healthy holiday season! See you on January 4.
 

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Monday, December 21, 2020

The Ship Has Sailed

 


PRESENTED BY THE CITY OF SALEM
"Virginia's Championship City"

D3Playbook

DECEMBER 21, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Monday Morning!  AFC East Champs. Just sayin'

>> Today's Word Count: 1,419. Top off your coffee cup and settle in.  Coffee Emoji, Apple style

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Remember to follow us on Twitter @D3Playbook for the latest news and transactions

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook
TOP STORY

1.  The Ship Has Sailed



by Daniel Libit and Luke Cyphers, Sportico


"Not since it began its hyper-commercialized climb in the mid-1980s has intercollegiate athletics faced a public pushback like it has over the past 18 months. Beginning in September 2019 with the approval of California’s Fair Pay to Play Act, the first state law allowing college athletes to earn money from their names, images and likenesses, the NCAA’s core tenet of amateurism has been put on the chopping block.

But as athlete-rights reforms, especially in the economic sphere, have gained public popularity and political salience, other critiques and critics of college sports have retreated from the conversation. This vanishing wing of the opposition was once led by Jon Ericson, the 84-year-old former provost of Drake University, and saw big-time sports as a completely commercial pursuit that had nothing to do with a college education, frequently perverting the academic mission with rampant fraud and invariably soaking up resources that would otherwise serve the general student population and, yes, the faculty. They railed not against athlete exploitation but against the damage to higher learning, a concern now rarely heard in the reform conversation. Seldom does the current discussion turn on whether sports elbows out the needs of non-athlete students, or corrupts the curriculum, or squanders the energies of university presidents and regents –– or whether it belongs anywhere near what are supposed to be institutions of higher learning.

In the debate over how to reform college sports, the money-minded appear to have won."

>> Situational Awareness: "Indeed, college sports criticism has become consumed by talk of athlete compensation, advancing — implicitly, at least — the idea that if athletes are recognized as workers and allowed to profit from their labor, then the self-asserting ideals of intercollegiate athletics will finally be realized."

>> Yes, But: Ericson, who founded the Drake Group, a not-for-profit organization founded in 1999 to “defend academic integrity” against the corrosive aspects of college sports, disagrees. "He contends that the prioritization of athlete interests, however well-founded and enlightened, has led to a short-sightedness about how big and multifaceted the problem really is. If tomorrow athletes were granted total financial freedom, beyond NIL rights, that would do very little to answer the question of why a multibillion-dollar sports enterprise should enjoy tax-exempt status, governmental support and massive subsidies from everyday college students by being conjoined with the American higher education system."

>> Quotable: “It’s become patently clear to everyone that big-time college football and basketball are just as much professionalized as the NFL or NBA,” says Tom Farrey, a former ESPN investigative reporter and now the executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Sports & Society Program. “If it’s a business arrangement and not an extension of the educational institution,” he says, “how do we sort through the business questions, including the labor question?”

>> The Final Word: “We lost,” Ericson says. “I think the evidence is clear that there is no interest in addressing the academic corruption in college sports.”

>> An Important Read

 

NCAA

2. Champs Committee Recap


The Division III Championships Committee met via videoconference on December 8 and did not make a decision on the future of the 2021 winter championships.

The committee agreed to continue monitoring sport sponsorship numbers in order to base future decisions about the conduct of winter championships on the most accurate data possible. The group did reaffirm its decision to set 60 percent as the sponsorship threshold for conducting a championship for sports with more than 200 sponsoring institutions (basketball, indoor track and field, swimming and diving) and 70 percent for sports with 51 to 200 sponsoring institutions (ice hockey, wrestling).

Elsewhere, the committee did not support the Colonial States Athletic Conference's request for an extension of the AQ grace period in women's lacrosse for 2020-21, but did support the transition of the Commonwealth Coast Women's Hockey Conference to the Commonwealth Coast Conference.

The committee also acknowledged a request from the softball committee to move selections and regionals one week later for 2021 due to the elimination of super regionals with the reduced bracket size. The committee moved this item to its January meeting due to time constraints and the likelihood that the baseball committee will make a similar proposal.

>> Full Report

 

CONFERENCES

3.  Scorecard
 

We continue to update the winter and spring competition seasons for schools and conferences that have made formal announcements. Others have yet to indicate plans for the upcoming seasons.

According to D3hoops.com, 89 institutions have opted out of competition in winter sports in 2020-21.

Please let us know if we've missed your league or conference.
 

Moving Forward (16)

Waiting to Make Call (7)

Canceled Conference Play and Championships (14)

Canceled Winter Competition (3)

No Formal Announcement (5)
  • Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference
  • Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • New Jersey Athletic Conference
  • Skyline Conference
  • Upper Midwest Athletic Conference

 
NCAA

4. Calendar

 
January
7 - Championships Committee
9-10 - Student-Athlete Advisory Committee
11-15 - NCAA Convention
12 - Management Council
14 - Presidents Council
15 - Post-Convention Management Council

 
 SPONSORED MESSAGE
 
 
The City of Salem and Salem Parks & Recreation along with other localities in the Roanoke Valley host a variety of softball and baseball tournaments throughout the year. We work with Roanoke County, Roanoke City, Botetourt County and the Roanoke Valley Convention and Visitor's Bureau. USA, NSA, USSSA, Got Game, Softball Nations, Freedom Sports and ISF are organizations that bring tournaments to the Roanoke Valley.

Find out more at SalemChampionships.com

 
REVIEW

5. Weekend Stars Star on Apple iOS 14.2
 
  • Christian Stewart's basket with :05 left lifted Birmingham-Southern (3-0) past Huntingdon, 76-74Evan Sigler led the Panthers with 19, while Stewart added 18. Damien Madison led all scorers with 32 markers for the Hawks.
     
  • Ashley Faux scored a career-best 16 points and gathered nine rebounds as Mary Hardin-Baylor improved to 4-1 with a 67-64 win at LeTourneau. Taylor Kollmorgan had nine points and a team-high 12 caroms for the Cru.
 
NOTEBOOK

6.  Around DIII

Image
  • Utica College announced its plan to begin construction on a $3.5 million athletic facility in March. The facility will have a turf field with lines for football, lacrosse, field hockey and softball; an eight-lane track; a scoreboard; stadium bleachers, a press box and a scoreboard.
     
  • Methodist announced the naming of its new soccer facility as the "Nancy and Murray Duggins Soccer Stadium." The Duggins Soccer Stadium features the addition of 200 permanent seats, a concession stand, ticket office for tournament matches, and restrooms. These improvements add to the two-story soccer fieldhouse and new stadium lights, which were installed in 2017.
     
  • Andrew Jones, a former standout offensive tackle at Wheaton (Ill.), joined the Seattle Seahawks practice squad
     
  • Happy birthday to one of the best venues in all of college hockey - the HersheyPark Arena - home of Lebanon Valley hockey. The Old Barn (see above) opened on December 19, 1936. Its most famous event was not a hockey game. On March 2, 1962, Wilt Chamberlain scored 100 points in a game against the New York Knicks.

 
TRANSACTIONS

7.  Comings and Goings
 
 
1 THING

8.  Ending a 25-Year Drought bills nfl

The year was 1995. The first year that the Internet was privatized and America Online and Prodigy offered access to the World Wide Web system for the first time. A gallon of gas averaged $1.09. Toy Story - the first entirely computer-animated feature film - was released, while the Grateful Dead broke up.

1995 was also the last time the editor's beloved Buffalo Bills won the AFC East title. Until Saturday afternoon.

Yes, it's just a triumph over three teams. But it's an accomplishment that has not been achieved by the Bills in a quarter century.

So, while I savor what has been accomplished ... I anxiously anticipate what is still possible. Won and Not Done.

Image

 
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Friday, December 18, 2020

A Fall Like No Other

 


PRESENTED BY THE CITY OF SALEM
"Virginia's Championship City"

D3Playbook

DECEMBER 18, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

 
Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>> Good Friday Morning! Is it really the last shopping weekend before Christmas?

>> Today's Word Count: 1,506

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Remember to follow us on Twitter @D3Playbook for the latest news and transactions

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook
TOP STORY

1. A Fall Like No Other
 

by Elizabeth Redden, Inside Higher Ed


"Sewanee: The University of the South finished the in-person portion of the fall semester with 16 positive cases among students.

The liberal arts college in Tennessee credits its relatively low case numbers to weekly required COVID testing for the approximately 1,600 students on campus combined with a “bubble” approach that largely prohibited students from leaving campus except for essential activities such as medical appointments. Students had to formally request approval from the dean of students' office for any off-campus trips, and a student caught violating the rules by breaching the bubble and leaving the campus without permission, or hosting a guest from off campus, would have to leave campus to quarantine for two weeks and be retested before rejoining the bubble.

Over the course of the semester, 26 students were sent home for two weeks for bubble-related infractions. Lauren Goodpaster, assistant dean for campus life, said Sewanee tried to increase on-campus entertainment options and make accommodations for students’ needs and wants. Food trucks were brought to the campus. Campus officials negotiated with restaurants that don’t typically deliver to provide delivery to students. Twice-weekly Walmart runs by campus life staff were provided to pick up student orders. Goodpaster said the college’s outing club also increased the number of outdoors trips it offered on the university’s 13,000-acre campus.

“We are a residential liberal arts college on top of a mountain plateau in a rural setting,” said David Shipps, Sewanee’s vice president for risk management. “You can’t ask for a better set of circumstances to attempt to create a bubble, which was essentially intended to reduce the risk of introducing the virus on campus. That’s where we focused our efforts over the course of the semester."

He's convinced it worked."

>> The Big Picture: "Colleges unquestionably had very different degrees of success in keeping the virus in check, and luck no doubt played a role in how different colleges fared. It's difficult to make cross-institutional comparisons, not least because it's impossible to make precise statements about the prevalence of disease at those colleges that did not do frequent, broad-based testing."

>> Of Note: "Connecticut College tested students twice weekly and faculty and staff once or twice weekly depending on the number of days a week they were on campus. It was one of more than 100 colleges that partnered with the Broad Institute, a nonprofit research institution in Cambridge, Mass., that provided testing to colleges at the relatively low cost of $25 a test. "Knowing what the positivity rate was on our campus at any given time, it enabled us to hold in-person classes, it enabled us to have student clubs," said Victor Arcelus, the dean of students at Connecticut College. "Our varsity athletes were able to engage in in-person training, and ultimately we were able to do some inter-squad scrimmages.”

>> Continue Reading

 

COVID

2.  PA Cautions Colleges About Reopening
 
by Bill Schackner, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


"Two state agencies are urging colleges, universities and other higher education institutions to maximize remote instruction and consider delaying the return of students to campus since COVID-19 hospitalizations “could peak in January and February."

A joint statement Wednesday from the departments of Education and Health did not specify what officials see as the earliest prudent dates for students to return for spring semester — at least in person. Officials with the agencies could not immediately be reached to provide more clarity on the statement.

A number of public and private campuses in the Pittsburgh region and elsewhere — including the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University, Penn State University and some state-owned institutions — moved spring semester back by days or weeks, or will start the semester relying on remote instruction.

>> Be Smart: Most Division III campuses will not be reopening for at least 3-4 weeks. With more data on rate of infections and positivity rates throughout the Commonwealth, it remains to be seen if institutions would respond to the encouragement. But it is not out of the realm of possibility that schools with plans to begin playing basketball in mid-January may postpone.

>> Read More

 

 

FOOTBALL

3. Bridging the Gap
 


By Iain Higgins and John Likanje, PickinSplinters.com


"Eleven years ago, Jordan Hogan was a freshman, third-string wide receiver at SUNY Brockport. Today, he’s the quarterbacks coach for the Arizona Cardinals. In 2011, Ali Marpet took his first collegiate snap for the Hobart College Statesmen. Today, he is starting at center and guard for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

A pair of NFL journeys that began at Division III schools in upstate New York. These are two of many stories of players outside Power 5 conferences that have paved their way to the pros.

Over the past three seasons, 210 former Division II and Division III players have competed in the NFL: 93 in 2018, 57 in 2019 and 60 this year. Of this player pool, 32 had their name called on Draft Night. These numbers may come off as surprising to casual fans, especially those who may not extensively follow college football.

But it’s not unexpected for those who coach and play outside the major conferences."

>> Situational Awareness: "University of Rochester head coach Chad Martinovich believes it’s due to NFL front offices expanding their scouting departments so that they can afford to scour the country for these diamonds in the rough. “There are a few factors,” Martinovich said when explaining this. “One would be the bigger use of analytics in the NFL, especially when it comes to scouting.”

>> Reality Check: “You got to be really good,” Hogan said when breaking down how hard it is to make an NFL roster and then become a full-time starter. “You really got to stick out. I’ve been around some really good Division III players who I thought would’ve gotten into the league and easily make a practice squad. But there are all type of players on the practice squad that nobody sees. These guys are some of the top athletes in the world.”

>> The Key Stat: "The fact that Marpet graduated from a Division III school and has had a productive professional career is a feat within itself. It’s no secret that Division III sports are mostly for academic-minded athletes whose priority is their education. Martinovich, who has spent 26 of his 28 years of coaching at that level, confirmed this himself and explained that’s how he and most other programs around the country conduct their recruitment."

>> The Final Word: “I think we’ve surprised a lot of people when they hear Division III,” said Jason Mangone, head coach at SUNY Brockport. “I think they don’t understand the amount of talent that it takes to play at a good Division III school. Some of these kids that are playing Division II and Division III are guys that are getting opportunities to play at Division I, but they want to play sooner.”

>> Continue Reading

 

SPONSORED MESSAGE

 
The City of Salem and Salem Parks & Recreation along with other localities in the Roanoke Valley host a variety of softball and baseball tournaments throughout the year. We work with Roanoke County, Roanoke City, Botetourt County and the Roanoke Valley Convention and Visitor's Bureau. USA, NSA, USSSA, Got Game, Softball Nations, Freedom Sports and ISF are organizations that bring tournaments to the Roanoke Valley.

Find out more at SalemChampionships.com


 
CONFERENCES

4.  Scorecard


We continue to update the winter and spring competition seasons for schools and conferences that have made formal announcements. Others have yet to indicate plans for the upcoming seasons.

Yesterday, Mount St. Mary College announced cancellation of winter sports competition, while Saint Mary's (Ind.) canceled its basketball season. According to D3hoops.com, 89 institutions have opted out of competition in winter sports in 2020-21.

Please let us know if we've missed your league or conference.
 

Moving Forward (15)

Waiting to Make Call (7)

Canceled Conference Play and Championships (14)

Canceled Winter Competition (3)

No Formal Announcement (6)
  • Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference
  • Little East Conference
  • Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • New Jersey Athletic Conference
  • Skyline Conference
  • Upper Midwest Athletic Conference


 

TRANSACTIONS

5. Comings and Goings
 
 
LAST WORD

6.  1 Snow Thing

Image

From Binghamton, N.Y.  Where do you even begin?
Have a great weekend.

 

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