Friday, January 3, 2020

One for the Ages

D3Playbook
JANUARY 3, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 
>>  Good Friday Morning!

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. We encourage you to share with a colleague and invite them to subscribe at the link below.

>> Today's Word Count: 1,639. Get ready for the first weekend of 2020!

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook


1.  One for the Ages
 


"Rarely had a Rose Bowl seen such flawless execution.
The preparation was inspired, the key players unwavering and a national television audience enthralled.
Nearly 60 years ago, an intrepid interloper made an uninvited, unprecedented and unforgettable appearance in the so-called Granddaddy of Them All.
Caltech made the Rose Bowl.
A small band of ingenious Caltech students made it happen, surreptitiously altering a University of Washington halftime flip-card routine so that it would spell out “CALTECH” in what became known as the Great Rose Bowl Hoax of 1961.
Their leader was Lyn Hardy, mastermind of a stunt that has been called the greatest collegiate prank of all time."

>> Situational Awareness: After learning that the Washington band and cheerleaders were staying in dormitories at Long Beach State, Hardy showed up posing as a reporter for the Dorsey High student newspaper. (Hardy, a Caltech junior at the time, was a Dorsey graduate.) The cheerleaders, who organized the flip-card routine, willingly shared the technical details of how it worked.

>> What's Happened Next: After breaking into the cheerleaders' room, the group lifted a card-stunt instruction card, and took it back to Pasadena and had some 2,400 copies made. Early on New Year’s Eve, while the cheerleaders were at Disneyland, Hardy’s group broke into their dorm room again, this time “borrowing” the master instructions. Back at Caltech, the Fiendish 14 mapped out their own master plans on graph paper and, recruiting partygoers to assist, stamped out a new set of 2,232 individual instruction cards.

>> Worth Noting: They had left the first 11 stunts virtually unaltered. So at halftime, with Washington holding a 17-0 lead on its way to a 17-7 victory over the No. 1-ranked Minnesota Golden Gophers, nothing at first seemed out of place.

>> Of Note: “It was one of those classic moments when a prank comes together instantly, perfectly and dramatically,” applauds museumofhoaxes.com, which lists the “Great Rose Bowl Hoax” atop its list of the all-time top 10 college pranks.
>> Keep Reading with Jerry Crowe, Los Angeles Times

 
2.  An Online Class Apart
 
Heisman Trophy winner Joe Burrow is a hero on LSU’s Baton Rouge campus, but he hasn’t seen much of it because he took graduate courses online. Justin Fields rarely has to step inside an Ohio State classroom building because he also does most of his school work online to accommodate his grueling football schedule.
Fields, a sophomore quarterback who was a Heisman finalist, said online classes allow him to split his time between studying at home or relaxing with Netflix and the Woody Hayes Athletic Center, where besides football facilities there is a new lavish lounge for players that offers made-to-order meals, massage chairs, video games on big screens and a cryogenic chamber.
Online classes are a fact of modern college life. For football players with immense demands on their time nearly year-round, working online helps them fit school in when it’s convenient — especially during travel for road games — and to avoid having to mix it up with a bunch of other students clamoring for a selfie for their Instagram. The arrangement also allows them, if they choose, to spend most of their waking hours around teammates and others associated with the football program.
That can be good and bad.

>> The Big Picture: Of the 46 schools from the “power five” conferences that responded to an Associated Press survey, 27 have no limits on how many online courses athletes may take. A dozen others have few online course offerings or limit how many athletes may take.

>> Between The Lines: Burrow, who was awarded a master’s degree in liberal arts last Friday, acknowledged his laser focus on football in Baton Rouge kept him sequestered. That’s why he decided to spend a few minutes celebrating with fans postgame at Tiger Stadium last month. “I don’t go to class. I take online classes, so I don’t get to see any of those people,” he said. “And I kind of just wanted to see them for the first time and just thank them.”

>> What They're Saying: “Just from an industry standpoint, we worry daily and nightly how we monitor academic integrity in online courses. How are we ensuring students are doing the work themselves? Are we ensuring if they do need additional tutoring or support, how is it their work and not the tutor’s work? There are challenges there that are inherent to the online nature versus the system that we’ve built with compliance in in-person classes.” - Brian Russell, associate AD for academic services and student development, Illinois.

>> Yes, But: “I get very heated when people make criticisms of online classes. It’s simply another delivery system to help students get through schools. Ours are proctored exams, they have cameras on them, the kids understand all of the implications of taking an online class. It’s worked beautifully for us.” - Marilyn Middlebrooks, associate AD for academic affairs, Oklahoma State.

>> Go Deeper from the Associated Press
 
3.  About Last Night

  Smith continued its best start in program history with a 58-51 victory at Trinity (Conn.). Katelyn Pickunka had a double-double with 14 points and 10 rebounds as the Pioneers improved to 12-0.

  Top-ranked Swarthmore held off a challenge from visiting Rochester, 59-56, to remain perfect through 10 games.

  Jeremy Kalonji scored 31 points and collected nine rebounds as Adrian (6-5) pounded North Park, 89-65.

 
 
SPONSORED MESSAGE

Would you like to sponsor this newsletter? Would you like to advertise an open position in your department for a head coach or administrator? Contact d3playbook@gmail.com to get your job opening in front of decision-makers in small-college athletics.

 
4. Five-Star Matchups

Our look at the weekend's biggest games inside and outside the top 10.

Inside the Top 10
WBB: #6 Amherst (8-1) at #24 Widener (11-0), Saturday, 4:00

WIH: #1 Plattsburgh (10-1) at #3 Norwich (10-1), Sunday, 2:00
WIH: #6 Adrian (9-1-1) vs. #8 Elmira (7-2), Sunday, 5:00

MBB: #1 Swarthmore (10-0) at Stevens (8-1), Sunday, 3:00

Outside the Top 10
MBB: Utica (8-2) at #22 Hamilton (9-1), Friday, 2:00
MBB: Tufts (9-2) at Nichols (7-2), Saturday, 1:00
MBB: Augsburg (7-2) at Saint John's (9-1), Saturday, 2:00
MBB: Nebraska Wesleyan (10-2) at Loras (10-2), Saturday, 5:00

WBB: Western New England (8-2) at Trinity, Conn. (9-2), Saturday, 1:00
WBB: UMass Boston (9-1) at Eastern Connecticut (7-2), Saturday, 1:00
WBB: #15 Transylvania (9-1) at Bluffton (8-2), Saturday, 1:00
WBB: John Carroll (9-1) at Ohio Northern (8-2), Saturday, 3:00
WBB: Rensselaer (7-2) at NYU (7-1), Sunday, 3:00

MIH: #11 Utica (7-2-2) at #7 Adrian (7-2-1), Saturday 7:05/Sunday 4:05


 
5. Weekend Preview   

Basketball (W) D3hoops.com
  1. Tufts (vs. UMass Dartmouth)
  2. Scranton
  3. Bowdoin
  4. Hope (at Trine)
  5. Mary Hardin-Baylor (vs. Texas-Dallas)
  6. Amherst (SAT at #24 Widener; SUN at Stevens)
  7. Wartburg (vs. Dubuque)
  8. DePauw (FRI vs. Allegheny; SAT vs. Hiram)
  9. George Fox (FRI vs. Willamette; SAT at Linfield)
  10. DeSales (at Cabrini)

Basketball (M) - D3hoops.com
  1. Swarthmore (SUN at Stevens)
  2. Emory
  3. Wittenberg (vs. Kenyon)
  4. Middlebury (FRI at Colby-Sawyer)
  5. St. Thomas MN (at Concordia-Moorhead)
  6. Marietta (at Wilmington)
  7. Randolph-Macon (at Emory and Henry)
  8. Nebraska Wesleyan (at Loras)
  9. UW-Platteville (vs. UW-Stout)
  10. Washington U.

Wrestling (Dual Meet) - NWCA
  1. Wartburg
  2. Loras (at Dubuque Flash Flanagan Open)
  3. Augsburg (vs. Saint John's)
  4. Wabash (at Manchester Spartan Classic)
  5. Johnson & Wales (at RWU Scott Viera Open)
  6. Mount Union (vs. Alma; vs. #22 Stevens)
  7. Baldwin Wallace
  8. Coe
  9. UW-La Crosse
  10. North Central

Ice Hockey (M) - USCHO
  1. UW-Eau Claire
  2. Trinity (FRI at Plymouth State; SAT vs. Suffolk)
  3. Geneseo (FRI vs. King's; SAT vs. Neumann)
  4. Norwich (FRI vs. Assumption; SAT vs. TBA)
  5. Augsburg
  6. Salve Regina (FRI vs. Cortland; SAT vs. TBA)
  7. Adrian (SAT/SUN vs. #11 Utica)
  8. Hobart (SAT vs. Saint John's; SUN vs. TBA)
  9. U. of New England (FRI vs. #14 Williams; SAT vs. TBA)
  10. Oswego (FRI vs. Saint Mary's; SAT vs. TBA)

Ice Hockey (W) - USCHO
  1. Plattsburgh (SUN at #3 Norwich)
  2. Middlebury
  3. Norwich (SUN vs. #1 Plattsburgh)
  4. Gustavus Adolphus
  5. UW-Eau Claire
  6. Adrian (SUN vs. #8 Elmira)
  7. UW-River Falls (FRI/SAT at Concordia-Moorhead)
  8. Elmira (SUN vs. #6 Adrian)
  9. St. Thomas
  10. Hamline (FRI vs. St. Norbert; SAT vs. Lake Forest)

all games/matches Saturday unless indicated

 
6.  Comings and Goings
 

 
7.   Best of the Decade: Video Games
 


From the introduction of groundbreaking in-game elements to refining how games make money, these are the titles that made the biggest impact on both players and the industry since 2010.

>> Why It Matters: Gaming is now humanity’s favorite form of entertainment, and the medium’s legacy was cemented this past decade.

>> The Big Picture: Video games have experienced a rapidly changing landscape in technology, business models (i.e. microtransactions and the sale of seasonal battle passes), and its market which now includes more female gamers and an older average audience.

>> Of Note: And regardless of whether they’re aware of it, Candy Crush Saga turned millions of unsuspecting people into gamers.

>> Be Smart: Over the last three years, Fortnite was everywhere. At one point, it boasted more than 200 million players a month, and became the biggest pop phenomenon of 2018. World Cup goals were celebrated with Fortnite dances. Former first lady Michelle Obama even did a dance. Major sports leagues worried about players not sleeping or training because of the game.

>> courtesy of the Washington Post

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Mental Health of Students

D3Playbook
JANUARY 2, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
 

>> Good Morning! ... and welcome back to the office.

>> Today's Word Count: 922. Easing you back into your groove.

>> If this email was forwarded to you, we invite you to sign up for your own in-box delivery below. Also well worth it.

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook

1. Mental Health of Students

Pictured here is Tyler Hilinski, a former quarterback at Washington State who took his life in early 2018. It was later found he was suffering from CTE. (Hilinski Hope Foundation website)

At the recent Learfield IMG College Intercollegiate Athletics Forum presented by Sports Business Journal, the hot topic wasn't NIL or the College Football Playoff format.

Rather, it was the genuine concern among athletic directors, conference commissioners, and other stakeholders in the emotional and mental well-being of student-athletes. And the critical need for universities at all levels to invest in resources to attend to the mental health needs of their students.

When asked during his keynote address what areas of improvement were most pressing at a national level, NCAA President Mark Emmert cited “health and wellness”, saying “the mental health issue is gigantic”.

>> Why It Matters: 35 percent of student-athletes access mental health support as compared to only 16% of the general student population.

>> Reality Check: Educating coaches, trainers, and student-athlete leadership groups is of tantamount importance in preventing tragedies. For example, as Mark Hilinski, co-founder of Hilinski's Hope Foundation, noted, you wouldn’t put an athlete on the field with a torn ACL. So why would you put a kid on the field if he/she is dealing with a mental health issue.

>> Be Smart: It’s all about resource allocation and prioritization, and the focus historically has rarely prioritized mental health.

>> Keep Reading with Patrick Rishe, founding director of the Sports Business Program at Washington-St. Louis.

>> Go Deeper: The Suicide of Teen Football Star Bryce Gowdy

2. Rivals 

Inspired by our friend Bob Quillman, we decided to include a list of the most-played rivalries in Division III basketball. The list includes all series of 200 games or more, entering the 2019-20 season.

We have found this to be challenging, as many schools don't have all-time series listings on their website and if they do, disagree on the number of games played (and won). Should you have changes (or additions), please pass them along. 
  1. Wesleyan-Williams, 238 (began 1901-02)
  2. Illinois Wesleyan-Millikin, 230 (1909-10)
  3. Geneva-Westminster (Pa.), 227 (1897-98)
  4. Amherst-Williams, 226 (1901)
  5. Franklin & Marshall-Gettysburg, 222 (1902)
  6. Knox-Monmouth, 221 (1907-08)
  7. North Central-Wheaton, 219 (1902-03)
  8. DePauw-Wabash, 215 (1906-07)
  9. UW Oshkosh-Stevens Point, 215 (1899)
  10. Hope-Kalamazoo, 211 (1913-14)
  11. Amherst-Wesleyan, 210 (1901-02)
  12. Albion-Alma, 204 (1912-13)
  13. UW La Crosse-River Falls, 204 (1910-11)
  14. UW Eau Claire-River Falls, 203 (1917)
  15. Calvin-Hope, 203 (1917-18)
  16. UW River Falls-Stout, 202
  17. Albion-Olivet, 201 (1910-11)
  


3.  Best of the Decade 


We conclude our "Best of the Decade" series with a look at the champions, runners-up and top four finishers in rowing. We hope you enjoyed the look back at the 2010s.

Champions: Bates (4), Williams (4), Trinity, Wellesley.

Runner-Up: Bates (5), Williams (2), Trinity, Wellesley, WPI.

Top Four Finishes: Bates (10), Wellesley (8), Williams (7), Ithaca (4), Trinity (4), William Smith (2), WPI (2), Hamilton, Pacific Lutheran, Wesleyan.
 


SPONSORED MESSAGE

Would you like to sponsor this newsletter? Would you like to advertise an open position in your department for a head coach or administrator? Contact d3playbook@gmail.com to get your job opening in front of decision-makers in small-college athletics.


 
4.   Betty Shellenberger

A true pioneer, Betty Shellenberger passed away at the age of 98. Her story is one for the ages and important in the annals of athletics for women.

Betty, known to friends as “Shelly” and born in her Germantown home, was one of the first Philly girls to get introduced to the sport of lacrosse, in 1933 as a middle schooler at Agnes Irwin School.

The list of her accomplishments is endless.
  • Inducted into the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame (1986)
  • Inducted as part of the Inaugural Class of the USA Field Hockey Hall of Fame (1988)
  • Inducted into the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame (1994)
  • Inducted into the Eastern PA Chapter of the US Lacrosse Hall of Fame (1998)
  • Inducted into the Agnes Irwin School Athletic Hall of Fame (2005)
  • Inducted into Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame, (2009)
  • Inducted into Chestnut Hill College Hall of Fame (2011)
Also:
  • She was a member of the USA Field Hockey National team (1939-41, 1946-55, 1960); Her 17 years on the national team (some as a reserve) is the longest in USA Field Hockey history
  • She was an 11-year member of the USA National Lacrosse Team
  • She served as the President of the United States Women’s Lacrosse Association (1967-68)

>> Go Deeper on an incredible life with Chris Goldberg and Phillylacrosse.com.

 

5. Previewing the Second Half 
 

Daniil Gerasimov has helped put Augsburg in the hunt for another MIAC title. (Photo courtesy of Augsburg Athletics)

The second half of the college hockey season begins tonight and U.S. College Hockey Online gets you ready with previews of the men's conference races in the MIAC, WIAC and NCHA.

>> West Region preview by Brian Lester, USCHO.com


 
6.  1 Wrestling Thing
 


If your New Year’s resolution is to join a sport, take inspiration from the growing number of American girls who are starting and joining female-specific wrestling teams. The Wall Street Journal reports that interest and participation have risen after more states launched wrestling championships specifically for girls, with Missouri experiencing a turnout eight times higher than the year before. While that state’s surge was notable, the National Federation of State High School Associations says it’s part of a much larger trend: Last season, there was a 28 percent increase in participation in girls wrestling across the country. 

 
Subscribe to d3Playbook

Wednesday, January 1, 2020

Where Are All the Women Coaches?

D3Playbook
JANUARY 1, 2020 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy D3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.
>>   Happy New Year! 

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. We appreciate your support over the last four months. Please invite your colleagues to sign up below.

>> Today's Word Count: 844. An easy read to start 2020.

Subscribe to d3Playbook

1. Where Are All the Women Coaches?



"Before Title IX, women were head coaches of more than 90 percent of women’s college teams. Passage of the law flooded women’s sports with money and created many more jobs, many of which went to men. Now about 40 percent of women’s college teams are coached by women. Only about 3 percent of men’s college teams are coached by women.
That means that men have roughly double the number of opportunities to coach. It only gets worse higher up the administrative ladder: 89 percent of Division I college athletic directors are men.
Without equal opportunities to lead, women don’t."
In this article by Lindsay Crouse in the New York Times and the accompanying video op-ed, the argument is made that by not diversifying, college teams are leaving "points on the field."

>> Why It Matters: We all know the trope: When a woman doesn’t lead well, it’s evidence that women can’t lead. When a man doesn’t work out, he wasn’t the right fit. Women need to be twice as good, often while working twice as hard, to stay in the game. A lot of women leave. And when you let an entire category of people disappear from your talent pool, everyone suffers.

>> The Big Picture: According to a Harvard study, gender-balanced teams perform better than male-dominated teams. A 2019 Harvard Business Review study found that “women outscored men on 17 of the 19 capabilities that differentiate excellent leaders from average or poor ones.” Another analysis of gender studies shows that when it comes to leadership skills, men excel at confidence, whereas women stand out for competence.

>> Worth Noting: Division III conferences such as the CentennialMiddle Atlantic and Southern Collegiate have annual symposiums that encourage undergraduate women to become involved in coaching and athletic administration.

>> The Final Word: Today we raise our little girls to follow their dreams and to excel. That is, until they become women and expect to be paid for it.


2.  #whyD3




3.  Best of the Decade 

We continue our "Best of the Decade" series with a look at the champions, runners-up and top four finishers in outdoor track and field.
Champions: UW-La Crosse (4), Mount Union (2), North Central (2), McMurry, UW-Eau Claire.

Runner-Up: UW-Eau Claire (3), UW-La Crosse (3), MIT, North Central, Salisbury, UW-Whitewater.

Top Four Finishes: UW-La Crosse (8), Mount Union (4), North Central (4), UW-Eau Claire (4), UW-Oshkosh (4), UW-Whitewater (3), Benedictine (2), McMurry (2), MIT (2), Salisbury (2), Monmouth, Rowan, Washington U., UW-Platteville, UW-Stout.


Champions: Wartburg (3), Illinois Wesleyan (2), George Fox, Loras, UMass Boston, UW-La Crosse, UW-Oshkosh, Washington U.

Runner-Up: UW-Oshkosh (4), Baldwin Wallace, Ithaca, Wartburg, Washington U., UW-Eau Claire.

Top Four Finishes: Wartburg (5), Washington U. (5), UW-Oshkosh (5), Illinois Wesleyan (3), UW-La Crosse (3), George Fox (2), Methodist (2), MIT (2), Baldwin Wallace, Buffalo State, Carthage, Claremont-M-S, Ithaca, Johns Hopkins, Loras, UMass Boston, Mount Union, Ramapo, Williams, UW-Eau Claire, UW-Whitewater.

Coming Thursday: we conclude our series with Rowing.


SPONSORED MESSAGE

Would you like to sponsor this newsletter? Would you like to advertise an open position in your department for a head coach or administrator? Contact d3playbook@gmail.com to get your job opening in front of decision-makers in small-college athletics.


4.  About Last Night 

  Calvin Fisher capped 2019 on a high note, tipping in the game-winning basket with three seconds remaining to lift Millikin (3-9) past No. 10 Washington U., 63-61.

  Shawn Pardee and Eddie Thigpen combined for 50 points as Olivet (3-8) rolled over No. 18 Carthage, 88-73. It was the Comets' first win over a top-25 opponent since 2010.

  It was quite a night for Pomona-Pitzer's Micah Elan who tallied 32 points and handed out 11 assists as the Sagehens (8-2) defeated Gustavus Adolphus, 110-91.

  King's Samantha Rajza made 12 of 14 shots from the floor, including six from long-range, for a career-high 31 points as the Monarchs (6-3) downed Keystone, 83-54.

  Ayanna Johnson filled the stat sheet with 21 points, 17 rebounds and eight blocks as Rowan improved to 11-1 with an 87-85 OT victory at Cabrini.

5.  Pics du Jour



Photo: Frank Franklin II/AP
Above: A fisheye lens shows confetti dropping over Times Square at midnight.
Below: Phones'-eye view of the Arc de Triomphe, on the Champs-Élysées, Paris.

Photo: Christophe Ena/AP


Photo: Bruna Prado/AP
Above: Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Below: On the Vegas strip, an eight-minute Fireworks by Grucci show.

Photo: Bryan Steffy/Getty Images
- courtesy of Axios

6.  1 Hangover Thing 

The "hangover remedy" business has exploded in the past three years, "a surprising counterpoint to decreased alcohol consumption among American millennials and Generation Z," the WashPost's Laura Reiley reports (subscription).
  • "There are capsules and patches and beverages."
  • Buzzwords include milk thistle and prickly pear.
"A raft of these remedies has cropped up on .... 'Shark Tank' ... and nabbed up to $10 million of Silicon Valley venture capital money," the Post adds.
  • Hangover-hack start-ups "have rocketed out $1 million in sales in three months."
also courtesy of Axios

Subscribe to d3Playbook

Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Importance of a College Education

D3Playbook
DECEMBER 31, 2019 | written by STEVE ULRICH
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III

Our goal is to keep you - the influencers in DIII athletics - apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

Happy Last Day of the Decade. Goodbye 10s. Welcome 20s!

>> Thanks for reading D3Playbook. Please invite your staff and colleagues to sign up below.

>> Today's Word Count: 812 (just under 4 minutes). Brief, concise, smart.

Subscribe to d3Playbook

1.  The Importance of a College Education

"About half of U.S. adults (51%) now consider a college education to be "very important," down from 70% in 2013. Over the same period, the percentages rating college as "fairly important" and "not too important" have both increased, to 36% and 13%, respectively.

Perceptions that a college education is very important have declined in the U.S. among all age groups since 2013, but the drop has been especially pronounced -- 33 percentage points -- among adults aged 18 to 29. As a result, younger adults are now less likely than middle-aged adults and seniors to consider college as very important, whereas the different age groups held similar perceptions in 2013.

Currently, slight majorities of adults aged 30 to 49 (51%), 50 to 64 (55%), and 65 and older (55%) say a college education is very important, compared with less than half of 18- to 29-year-olds (41%)."

>> Of Note: Consistent with what Gallup found in 2013, women today are more likely than men to report a college education is very important (57% vs. 45%, respectively), although the figures are down among both groups.

>> Sides of the Aisle: Less than half of Republicans (41%) say a college education is very important -- significantly lower than the percentages of Democrats (62%) and independents (50%) saying the same.

>> The Bottom Line: Extensive research still indicates a college degree leads to a higher-paying job, increased job security and healthier behaviors. Unfortunately, if a college education continues to feel out of reach for many and its value or political neutrality/integrity is questioned, fewer may take advantage of this unique and transformative experience.

Read More with lots of good data from Gallup

2.  About Last Night

Not a good night to be a top-25 men's basketball team, according to D3hoops.com.
  • No. 21 Guilford (9-2) upset No. 2 Emory, 70-69, on a running three-pointer at the buzzer by Jaylen GoreTake a look at the final hectic seconds.
  • Eastern Connecticut (4-5) toppled No. 12 Babson, 77-76. The Warriors trailed by as many as 19 points in the first half before rallying. Seth Thomas led ECSU with 20.
  • Stevens knocked off No. 13 Johns Hopkins, 72-65, in JHU coach Josh Loeffler's return to Hoboken.
Nor on the women's side ...
  • Austin College handed No. 5 Mary Hardin-Baylor a 70-61 defeat. The 'Roos led start-to-finish and were led by Reagan Chiaverini with 16.
  • Emerson's Kate Foultz went 4-for-4 at the line in OT to lift the Lions past No. 12 Messiah, 63-61. 
  • Becky Raeder scored a game-high 21 points as No. 19 UW-Whitewater edged No. 17 St. Thomas, 75-69.
Elsewhere in the men's game ...
  • Sam Majekodunmi poured in a career-high 44 points as Albright defeated Cabrini, 92-76.
On the mat ...
  • No. 3 Augsburg crowned five champions to win the team title at the Citrus Invitational. No. 15 NYU was second, followed by No. 7 Baldwin Wallace. Auggie 133 Victor Gliva posted a 6-1 semifinal decision over Ferrum's Levi Engleman in a showdown between the top two wrestlers in DIII. Gliva won the weight class and could assume the #1 spot in the next ranking.

3.  Best of the Decade

We continue our "Best of the Decade" series with a look at the champions, runners-up and top four finishers in indoor track and field.

Champions: UW-Oshkosh (3), Wartburg (2), Baldwin Wallace, UMass-Boston, UW-La Crosse, Washington U., Williams.

Runner-Up: UW-Oshkosh (3), Illinois College, Illinois Wesleyan, Ithaca, UW-La Crosse, Wartburg, Washington U., Williams.

Top Four Finishes: UW-Oshkosh (6), Wartburg (5), Washington U. (5), Williams (3), Illinois Wesleyan (3), UW-La Crosse (3), George Fox (2), Methodist (2), MIT (2), UW-Eau Claire (2), Baldwin Wallace, Chicago, Illinois College, Ithaca, Loras, UMass-Boston, Nebraska Wesleyan, Ohio Northern, St. Lawrence, Stevens, Wheaton, Mass.


Champions: North Central (5), UW-La Crosse (3), UW-Eau Claire (2), Mount Union.

Runner-Up: UW-Eau Claire (2), UW-La Crosse (2), Central, Mount Union, North Central, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Stevens Point, UW-Whitewater.

Top Four Finishes: UW-La Crosse (8), UW-Eau Claire (7), North Central (6), UW-Oshkosh (5), Mount Union (3), UW-Whitewater (3), UW-Stevens Point (2), Central, Monmouth, Rowan, St. Olaf, UW-Stout, Wartburg.


Tomorrow: Outdoor Track and Field


    SPONSORED MESSAGE

    Would you like to sponsor this newsletter? Would you like to advertise an open position in your department for a head coach or administrator? Contact d3playbook@gmail.com to get your job opening in front of decision-makers in small-college athletics.

    4. Unbeaten   

    Who are the remaining teams with unblemished records heading into the final day of the decade?

    WBB (10)
    Albright (12-0), Austin (9-0), Bethel (10-0), Bowdoin (10-0), Edgewood (10-0), Hope (12-0), Smith (11-0), Tufts (10-0), Widener (11-0), Williams (10-0).

    MBB (7)
    Colby (9-0), Middlebury (10-0), Randolph-Macon (11-0), St. Thomas TX (10-0), Swarthmore (9-0), UW-La Crosse (10-0), Wittenberg (10-0).

    WIH (3)
    Colby (6-0-1), Middlebury (5-0-2), U. of New England (7-0-1).

    5.  #whyD3





       

    6.  Sports


    Not much more to say here. Happy New Year!

    Subscribe to d3Playbook