Friday, October 11, 2019

UMHB Must Vacate Football Title

D3Playbook
OCTOBER 11, 2019 | written by Steve Ulrich
your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III
Welcome to d3Playbook

>> Good Morning and Happy Friday!

Note: You are receiving the d3Playbook via email because of your role as an influencer in Division III athletics. d3Playbook is available as a subscription email and can also be viewed online at d3Playbook.com.

Our goal is to keep you apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

Thanks for reading.

Steve

>> Today's Word Count: 1,525 words (just about 6 minutes of your time. Enjoy your coffee or that pumpkin spice latte!)

>> If this email was forwarded to you, we invite you to sign up for your own in-box delivery below.

Subscribe to d3Playbook


1.  UMHB Must Vacate Football Title


The NCAA’s Committee on Infractions announced on Thursday that Mary Hardin-Baylor would be required to surrender victories earned by the football team for the 2016-2017 seasons, including the school’s first national championship in 2016. UMHB has announced its intention to appeal the decision.
The infractions stem from events that took place during the two seasons in question. During that time, UMHB head coach Pete Fredenburg and other associate coaches provided local transportation to one student-athlete at the school. Fredenburg loaned the student the use of a 2006 Subaru. Fredenburg also loaned the car to another player for about an hour. The loans are a violation of NCAA rules regarding impermissible benefits.
Upon learning of the potential violations, the university performed an internal investigation into the matters and self-reported the incident to the NCAA. As a result of the investigation, UMHB imposed a three-month suspension without pay on Fredenburg as well as a three-game suspension at the start of the 2018 season. In addition, the school placed the football program on probation for two years, enhanced compliance training and a $2,500 fine.
The university sent a comprehensive self-report to the NCAA. The NCAA Summary Disposition process reviewed the report, and, in collaboration with the university and Fredenburg, agreed to the facts of the violation. This agreement precluded the need for a formal hearing before the NCAA. While the NCAA accepted all of UMHB’s corrective actions and self-imposed penalties, it added the requirement of the vacating of the program’s records for the two seasons involved.
UMHB requested an expedited hearing on the matter of the season records, but the Committee on Infractions declined to remove the additional penalty. As a result, the university has elected to file an appeal to the NCAA Infractions Appeal Committee.

>> Why It Matters: “Of particular concern to the COI is the fact that a football staff member questioned the head coach about providing a car to the student-athlete, but the head coach dismissed the staff member’s concern and took no action to ascertain the permissibility of his actions,” the committee said in its report.

>> What They're Saying: “We have worked diligently with the NCAA during the last 20 months to complete this matter in a cooperative and honorable way, and we will continue to do so during the appeal process.” - Randy O'Rear, UMHB president

>> What's Next: During the two-year probation period, the school will be required to notify all football prospects that the school is on probation. Additionally, the university is required to file a letter from the president at the end of the probation period affirming that the policies and procedures of the athletics department conform to NCAA regulations. The Crusaders will be allowed to participate in post-season play and will have no recruiting bans.

>> Watch a report from KCEN-TV
2. Colleges Seek Radical Solutions to Survive



When Steve Thorsett, president of Willamette University, crunched the numbers, things looked grim.
Business was flagging. His flow of customers had fallen to a 10-year low, down more than 20 percent since 2015. By 2016, annual expenses had begun outpacing operating revenues by $14 million.
In an increasingly unforgiving market, Thorsett needed to do more than chip away at the margins of this problem. He could make cuts, but that was complicated in his industry, and would likely only speed the downward spiral. To differentiate himself from his competitors, this chief executive determined that his operation needed to grow bigger, not smaller.
So Thorsett took a classic shortcut to expansion. He found a partner that was on even shakier ground. The resulting acquisition will bring with it several hundred new consumers, allowing efficiencies of scale.

The move has other strategic advantages. Rather than duplicating what he does already, the organization he procured will help Thorsett broaden his offerings in ways that many of his rivals can’t, and at a speed that most can’t match.
Now Thorsett radiates optimism about the future — something rare these days among his counterparts, many of whom face challenges as bad as or worse than his.

>> Situational Awareness: With low unemployment luring potential students straight into the workforce and a decline in the number of 18-year-olds, among other reasons, enrollment is down by more than 2.9 million since the last peak, in the fall of 2011, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. More than 400 colleges and universities still had seats available for freshmen and transfer students after the traditional May 1 deadline to enroll for this fall, the National Association for College Admission Counseling reports.

>> What's Next: Moody’s projects that the pace of college closings will soon reach 15 per year. Yet some campus leaders, asked what steps they’re taking to avoid this fate, responded like the president of one small private liberal arts college in Pennsylvania. His school, he said, would “continue to graduate students who will make a tangible and constructive difference in the world.”

>> Reality Check: “This is a business,” Thorsett said. “It’s not for profit, but we have to keep the lights on. We have to build a model that’s sustainable.”

>> Between The Lines: If it seems odd for colleges and universities to try to attract more customers by promising results that people might have been expecting anyway — degrees within four years, with jobs at the end — some of their strategies underscore the magnitude of the challenges they face.

>> Go Deeper with The Hechinger Report

SPONSORED MESSAGE

Searching for talent for your athletic department? Need assistance with a departmental review or a strategic plan? Time to refresh your conference's policies and procedures? ASC is dedicated to small colleges and is committed to providing solutions for your concerns.

Contact steveulrich.asc@gmail.com to see how ASC can help your organization.



3.  Top Campus Golf Courses

GolfWeek magazine's annual list of the top campus golf courses is out ... and Division III has three representatives.

 3. Taconic GC, Williamstown, Mass. (Williams)
11. Orchards GC, South Hadley, Mass. (Mount Holyoke)
17. The Course at Sewanee, Sewanee, Tenn. (U. of the South)

>> Worth Noting: Courses are rated by Golfweek’s national group of players, with ratings based on multiple criteria such as memorability of the holes and the “walk-in-the-park-test.” The raters then give each course an overall rating.

>> See the Entire List
    4. Weekend Preview

    Tough to ignore the top-15 contests this weekend (all times EDT)
    • Field Hockey: #8 Franklin & Marshall at #11 Ursinus (watch), 12:00
    • Football: #6 Bethel at #4 Saint John's (watch), 2:00
    • Soccer (M): #1 Tufts at #2 Amherst (watch), 2:30

    Football - D3Football.com
    1. Mary Hardin-Baylor (vs. East Texas Baptist)
    2. Mount Union (at Wilmington)
    3. UW-Whitewater (vs. #19 UW-Platteville)
    4. Saint John's (vs. #6 Bethel)
    5. Wheaton, Ill. (at North Park)
    6. Bethel (at #4 Saint John's)
    7. Muhlenberg (idle)
    8. Berry (vs. Hendrix)
    9. North Central (vs. Augustana)
    10. Ithaca (vs. Buffalo State)
    Soccer (M) - United Soccer Coaches
    1. Tufts (Sat at #2 Amherst; Sun at Hamilton)
    2. Amherst (vs. #1 Tufts)
    3. Calvin (vs. Trine)
    4. Franklin & Marshall (at Ursinus)
    5. Washington and Lee (idle)
    6. Chicago (Sun at Rochester)
    7. Johns Hopkins (vs. Swarthmore)
    8. Ithaca (at Clarkson)
    9. Kenyon (vs. Denison)
    10. Penn State Behrend (vs. Penn State Altoona)

    Soccer (W) - United Soccer Coaches
    1. Messiah (at Widener)
    2. Middlebury (vs. Colby)
    3. Christopher Newport (at Salisbury)
    4. William Smith (at Vassar)
    5. Washington-St. Louis (vs. Emory)
    6. Johns Hopkins (vs. Muhlenberg)
    7. College of New Jersey (at Kean)
    8. Pomona-Pitzer (vs. Caltech)
    9. Wheaton, Ill. (at Augustana)
    10. MIT (Sat vs. Mount Holyoke; Sun at #24 Williams)

    Field Hockey - NFHCA
    1. Middlebury (vs. #17 Colby)
    2. College of New Jersey (at William Paterson)
    3. Salisbury (at St. Mary's)
    4. Rowan (vs. #16 Kean)
    5. Vassar (vs. Ithaca)
    6. Bowdoin (at Connecticut College)
    7. Tufts (at Amherst; Sun at Hamilton)
    8. Franklin & Marshall (at #11 Ursinus)
    9. Williams (idle)
    10. Johns Hopkins (vs. Muhlenberg)

    Volleyball - AVCA
    1. Emory (idle)
    2. Calvin (Fri at Albion)
    3. Chicago (at Elmhurst/North Central)
    4. Carthage (at Carroll)
    5. Saint Benedict (Fri at Saint Mary's; Sat at St. Olaf)
    6. Berry (Fri at Millsaps; Sat at Birmingham Southern)
    7. Claremont-M-S (Fri at Pomona-Pitzer)
    8. Colorado College (Fri vs. Illinois College/Randolph-Macon; Sat vs. DePauw)
    9. UW-Whitewater (Fri vs. Carroll/Gustavus Adolphus; Sat vs. Illinois Wesleyan)
    10. Trinity, Texas (Fri vs. UC Santa Cruz/#11 Ohio Northern; Sat vs. Mary Hardin-Baylor/Rowan)
      

    5.  Comings and Goings



    6.  Pic of the Day

                        Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
    Visitors look toward lower Manhattan inside the newly renovated 102nd-floor observatory of the Empire State Building.
    • The observatory is 1,250 feet above street level and features 360° views of New York City.

    7.  1 Baseball Thing

    I am completely mesmerzed by this. So you think it's easy to hit a baseball? Reason #1,259 why I'm not in the majors.

    Subscribe to d3Playbook

    Thursday, October 10, 2019

    BREAKING: Mary Hardin-Baylor Must Vacate 2016 Football Title

    D3Playbook - BREAKING NEWS
    OCTOBER 10, 2019 | written by Steve Ulrich
    your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III
    Welcome to d3Playbook

    >> We interrupt your Thursday with breaking news.

    Our goal is to keep you apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

    Thanks for reading.

    Steve

    >> If this email was forwarded to you, we invite you to sign up for your own in-box delivery below.
     
    Subscribe to d3Playbook


    BREAKING NEWS: Mary Hardin-Baylor Must Vacate 2016 Football Championship


    Mary Hardin-Baylor must vacate its 2016 NCAA Division III football championship, according to a decision by the Committee on Infractions.

    Head coach Pete Fredenburg impermissibly provided the use of his car to two student-athletes. According to the committee, the football staff members, led by Fredenburg, violated recruiting and extra benefit rules by providing impermissible transportation.

    “Of particular concern to the COI is the fact that a football staff member questioned the head coach about providing a car to the student-athlete, but the head coach dismissed the staff member’s concern and took no action to ascertain the permissibility of his actions,” the committee said in its report.

    >> The Key Stat: The penalties include the following:
    • Two years of probation (self-imposed by the university).
    • A vacation of records in which any ineligible student-athletes competed.
    • A $2,500 fine (self-imposed by the university).
    • Outside audit of the college’s athletics policies and procedures to ensure that they are consistent with institutional guidelines and NCAA Division III rules (self-imposed by the university).
    • A three-month suspension of the head coach and a suspension for the first three contests of the 2018 season (self-imposed by the university).
    • Mandatory attendance for the head coach at a 2018 NCAA Regional Rules Seminar and attendance during each year of probation (self-imposed by the university).
    • Mandatory attendance for all assistant football coaches, including the recruiting and academic coordinator, at a Regional Rules Seminar during probation.

    >> Rebuttal from UMHB: The NCAA's Committee on Infractions (COI) released its report today and accepted all of UMHB's corrective actions and self-imposed penalties, which included a two-year probation period for the football program, enhanced compliance training, and a $2,500 fine. Head Coach Pete Fredenburg also received a three-month suspension without pay and a three-game suspension at the beginning of the 2018 season.

    However, the COI added a penalty of vacating wins and records during the 2016 and 2017 football seasons, including the 2016 DIII National Championship, which UMHB will appeal.


    More to come in Friday's Playbook.

     
     
    SPONSORED MESSAGE

    Searching for talent for your athletic department? Need assistance with a departmental review or a strategic plan? Time to refresh your conference's policies and procedures? ASC is dedicated to small colleges and is committed to providing solutions for your concerns.

    Contact steveulrich.asc@gmail.com to see how ASC can help your organization.


     
    Subscribe to d3Playbook
    Know someone that would enjoy receiving d3Playbook?
    Send an email to d3Playbook@gmail.com with "subscribe" in the subject line
    Twitter
    Facebook
    Website
    Copyright © 2019, D3Playbook.com All rights reserved.

    Our mailing address is:
    d3Playbook@gmail.com

    Want to change how you receive these emails?
    You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

    An Unseen Admissions Scandal Victim

    D3Playbook
    OCTOBER 10, 2019 | written by Steve Ulrich
    your must-read briefing on what's driving the day in NCAA Division III
    Welcome to d3Playbook

    >> Good Morning! The National League championship series is now set between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Washington Nationals. Both teams won Game 5 on the road. October baseball ... gotta love it.

    Congratulations to the 34 athletic direct reports (ADRs) who were selected to attend the fifth annual ADR Institute in January in conjunction with the 2020 NCAA Convention. We've included you as recipients of the d3Playbook because of your role as an influencer in Division III athletics. d3Playbook is available as a subscription email and can also be viewed online at d3Playbook.com.

    Our goal is to keep you apprised of what's happening around Division III - the games, polls, news, happenings, awards, calendar of events, and much more. We hope you enjoy d3Playbook and that you'll share this with your friends, colleagues and co-workers.

    Thanks for reading.

    Steve

    >> Today's Word Count: 1,164 words (just under 5 minutes of your time. Enjoy your coffee)

    >> If this email was forwarded to you, we invite you to sign up for your own in-box delivery below.

    Subscribe to d3Playbook


    1.  An Unseen Victim of the College Admissions Scandal


    One teammate made tennis his whole life. The other had a grandfather whose company invented Hot Pockets. Guess which one went to Georgetown as a Division I recruit.

    by Daniel Golden and Doris Burke, ProPublica

    In April 2017, students at the Sage Hill (Calif.) School gathered to celebrate seniors who were headed to college as recruited athletes. Three had committed to play Division I sports, while most were headed to Division III. The captains of the girls' volleyball and girls' soccer programs were bound for Columbia and Denver, respectively. The other headed to DI - Grant Janavs - would attend Georgetown as a tennis recruit.

    Adam Langevin looked on in amazement. He had been Sage Hill's top tennis player for four years, trained long hours with renowned coaches, hit with college stars and budding pros, and acquitted himself well in regional and national tournaments. One of his coaches described his forehand as “pro potential, tour level.” Between tennis and classes, he’d had little time left for other extracurricular activities or a social life. In four years, he’d attended only two school dances, and had no romantic relationships, or even casual lunches with friends. He’d sacrificed it all for his goal of playing for the best Division I college tennis team he could. Earlier that month, he was told by California Polytechnic State University from the Big West Conference that there was no spot left on its team for him.

    Now he looked on as Grant was being celebrated as a future Division I tennis player at Georgetown, knowing that Grant wasn't even on the Sage Hill team as a senior. When Adam told his parents, his father speculated that Grant's billionaire family had endowed a building at the university. 
    Grant’s mother, Michelle Janavs, is the daughter of Paul Merage, who, with his brother, co-founded Chef America Inc., which created the Hot Pockets microwavable snack. Universities frequently reward donors by giving their children or grandchildren an edge in admissions.
    Nearly two years later, in March, 2019, the actual explanation emerged.

    >> Situational Awareness: The Georgetown tennis coach, Gordon Ernst, received more than $2.7 million in "consulting" fees to designate at least a dozen applicants as tennis recruits.

    >> Between The Lines: Elite colleges created the conditions for the scheme, from the lower admissions standards for athletes to the ever-increasing selectivity that ratchets up parents’ desperation. They’ve tacitly sold admissions slots for decades to major donors, yet professed shock that their coaches would as well.

    >> Reality Check: Once, Sage Hill’s hopes of defeating another school rested on a tiebreaker in Grant’s match. In the key rally, Grant made a correct line call in favor of his opponent on a close shot, depriving Sage Hill of victory. “Ninety percent of kids” would have called it the other way. He was very ethical and a great competitor. - A.G. Longoria, former Sage Hill coach

    >> Keep Reading courtesy of ProPublica

    2.  Everybody Made Money Off My NCAA Career, Except Me



    An exuberant top-scoring floor routine by U.C.L.A.’s Katelyn Ohashi went viral this year, making her one of the most famous college gymnasts ever. But N.C.A.A rules prevented Ohashi from making any money from the performance. In this Video Op-Ed from the New York Times, Ohashi argues that college students should be given the ability to earn income from their athletic achievement.


    SPONSORED MESSAGE

    Searching for talent for your athletic department? Need assistance with a departmental review or a strategic plan? Time to refresh your conference's policies and procedures? ASC is dedicated to small colleges and is committed to providing solutions for your concerns.

    Contact steveulrich.asc@gmail.com to see how ASC can help your organization.



    3.   Calendar 

    Oct. 16-18 - NCAA Division III FAR Fellows Institute, Indianapolis
    Oct. 21-22 - Management Council, Indianapolis
    Oct. 29-30 - Presidents Council, Atlanta
    Nov. 1 - Deadline for amendments-to-amendments and all resolutions for NCAA Convention
    Nov. 3 - Daylight Savings Time Ends
    Nov. 8-10 - Conference championship weekend (Field Hockey, Soccer, Volleyball)
    Nov. 10-11 - Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, Indianapolis
    Nov. 11-12 - Financial Aid Committee, Indianapolis
    Nov. 14 - Strategic Planning and Finance Committee teleconference
    Nov. 19-20 - Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement, Indianapolis
    Nov. 21-23 - Women's Volleyball championship, Cedar Rapids, Iowa
    Nov. 23 - Men's and Women's Cross Country championship, Lousivlle
    Nov. 23-24 - Field Hockey championship, Manheim, Pa.
    Dec. 6-7 - Men's and Women's Soccer championship, Greensboro, N.C.
    Dec. 20 - Football championship, Shenandoah, Texas

    4. Polls

    Cross Country (M) - USTFCCCA
    1. North Central (tie)
    2. Williams (tie)
    3. Wartburg
    4. Geneseo
    5. Washington-St. Louis
    6. Claremont-M-S
    7. Carnegie Mellon
    8. Johns Hopkins
    9. Pomona-Pitzer
    10. Otterbein
    11. Chicago, 12. MIT, 13. Calvin, 14. Rensselaer, 15. John Carroll, 16. UW-La Crosse, 17. Bates, 18. St. Olaf, 19. Amherst, T20. Berea, T20. Middlebury

    22. Dickinson, 23. UW-Stevens Point, 24. Emory, T25. Carleton, T25. Haverford, 27. Ithaca, 28. UW-Eau Claire, 29. Case Western, 30. UC Santa Cruz, 31. UW-Oshkosh, 32. NYU, 33. Trine, T34. Ramapo, T34. UW-Stout.

    >> Moving Up: St. Olaf (+11), Geneseo (+9), Berea (+8), John Carroll (+8)
    >> Moving Down: Case Western (-11), UW-La Crosse (-11), Carleton (-10)
    >> Hello: UW-Oshkosh, NYU, Trine, Ramapo
    >> Bye-Bye: WPI, Brockport, St. Thomas, Connecticut College


    Cross Country (W) - USTFCCCA

    1. Johns Hopkins
    2. Chicago
    3. Washington-St. Louis
    4. Tufts
    5. Williams
    6. Dickinson (tie)
    7. MIT (tie)
    8. Pomona-Pitzer
    9. Geneseo
    10. Claremont-M-S
    11. Oberlin, 12. Wartburg, 13. Carleton, 14. Rensselaer, 15. UW-Eau Claire, 16. St. Thomas, 17. Hope, 18. Middlebury, 19. Baldwin Wallace, 20. John Carroll.

    21. RIT, 22. St.Olaf, 23. Case Western, 24. Centre, 25. Rochester, 26. Allegheny, 27. Elmhurst, 28. UC Santa Cruz, 29. Emory, 30. Wesleyan, Conn., 31. Coast Guard, 32. Washington and Lee, 33. UW-Stevens Point, 34. Otterbein, T35. Swarthmore, T35. Vassar.

    >> Moving Up: John Carroll (+11), St. Olaf (+11), Baldwin Wallace (+8)
    >> Moving Down: Washington and Lee (-10), Carleton (-5), Wesleyan (-4)
    >> Hello: Allegheny, UW-Stevens Point, Otterbein, Swarthmore, Vassar
    >> Bye-Bye: UW-La Crosse, Carnegie Mellon, Messiah, Occidental


    5.  Comings and Goings 



    6.  Play of the Day



    7.  1 Sports Thing
     



    Extremely sad photo of Clayton Kershaw of the Los Angeles Dodgers, but it immediately brings to mind what the great Theodore Roosevelt once said...
    "It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. ... The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena ... who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming."

    - courtesy of Axios Sports


    Subscribe to d3Playbook

    Wednesday, October 9, 2019

    CCC Assumes Control of Hockey Operation


    1. Commonwealth Coast Assumes Colonial Hockey Operation
     

    The Commonwealth Coast Conference announced Friday that the CCC will begin to oversee women’s hockey as a championship sport beginning in 2020-21.
    The CCC will assume operation of a renamed Colonial Hockey Conference.

    The addition of women’s hockey was perpetuated by two big announcements within the conference – the addition of Suffolk to the league membership and current CCC member Western New England announcing it would be starting a varsity program in 2020-21.  
    Prior to those news items, there were four CCC full members with women’s hockey programs, all competing in the CHC — Endicott, Nichols, Salve Regina, and University of New England.
    Suffolk and WNE will become the league’s fifth and sixth members. Becker, the only remaining non-CCC member of the league, will remain in the rebranded conference as an associate. The Hawks are already CCC associate members in men’s hockey.
    As a seven-team league, the conference will retain the automatic qualifier into the NCAA Division III women’s tournament.

    >> What They're Saying: "Our presidents and athletic directors have worked diligently to expand the quality competition synonymous with the CCC brand. Adding women’s ice hockey to our inventory of sport offerings is a natural step in continuing our recent pattern of growth.” - Gregg Kaye, commissioner

    >> 
    The Big Picture“CHC commissioner Katie Boldvich has been totally supportive during the conversations that have led to the CCC’s historic announcement. Katie’s priority has always been promoting and growing the great sport of women’s ice hockey and increasing opportunities for female student-athletes in the sport."

    >> Worth Noting: For the past two seasons, the CHC was granted an automatic qualifier into the NCAA Division III tournament. Last season, Endicott won the CHC title and made the only national tournament appearance of the teams set to play in the rebranded league.

    2. Top-Ranked Jumbos Fall
     
    Babson College scored a pair of first-half goals and senior goalkeeper Steven Heintzelman finished with a season-high nine saves as the Beavers stunned top-ranked Tufts University, 2-0, in non-conference men's soccer action on Tuesday afternoon at Hartwell-Rogers Field.
    With the win, Babson improves to 6-4-2 on the year, while Tufts, which is the defending Division III national champions, slips to 8-1-1 and sees its 30-game unbeaten streak come to an end.

    >> The Key Stat: The Beavers are just the fourth team to score at least two goals against Tufts going back to the start of the 2016 season, a stretch that spans 74 matches.

     
    3.  ADR Institute

    Congratulations to the Division III Athletic Direct Reports (ADR) Institute 2020 cohort.  Thirty-four (34) athletics direct reports were selected to attend the fifth annual ADR Institute January 22-23 in conjunction with the 2020 NCAA Convention in Anaheim, California.   The purpose of the program is to engage Division III ADRs in best practices to oversee and manage athletics departments and to improve the relationships between ADRs and their presidents, athletics directors and conference commissioners.   Click here to see the 2020 cohort.

     
    SPONSORED MESSAGE


    Searching for talent for your athletic department? Need assistance with a departmental review or a strategic plan? Time to refresh your conference's policies and procedures? ASC is dedicated to small colleges and is committed to providing solutions for your concerns.

    Contact steveulrich.asc@gmail.com to see how ASC can help your organization.

     
    4. Podcast



    Recently Jack Ford conducted a podcast interview with Tori Murden McClure, the president of Spalding University and vice-chair of the Division III Presidents Council.  McClure was the first woman to row solo across the Atlantic Ocean, and the first woman to ski to the South Pole. And she can fix your car.  Click here to listen to the podcast.  

     
    5. Polls
     
    Soccer (M) - United Soccer Coaches
    1. Tufts (8-0-1)
    2. Amherst (8-0-2)
    3. Calvin (11-1)
    4. Franklin & Marshall (10-1)
    5. Washington and Lee (8-1-2)
    6. Chicago (5-1-4)
    7. Johns Hopkins (9-2)
    8. Ithaca (10-1-1)
    9. Kenyon (10-1)
    10. Penn State Behrend (11-0)
    11. Oneonta, 12. Central, 13. Rensselaer, 14. Luther, 15. Hardin-Simmons, 16. John Carroll, 17. Messiah, 18. Roanoke, 19. Catholic, 20. Middlebury, 21. Christopher Newport, 22. Claremont-M-S, 23. North Park, 24. Mary Washington, 25. Loras.

    >> Moving Up: Kenyon (+7), Messiah (+6), Rensselaer (+6)
    >> Moving Down: Loras (-16), Mary Washington (-13)
    >> Hello: Central, Roanoke, Christoper Newport, North Park.
    >> Goodbye: Rowan, Connecticut College, Cortland, Kalamazoo

    Soccer (M) - D3Soccer.com
    1. Tufts (8-0-1)
    2. Amherst (8-0-2)
    3. Calvin (11-1)
    4. Kenyon (10-1)
    5. Oneonta (10-1)
    6. Franklin & Marshall (10-1)
    7. Johns Hopkins (9-2)
    8. Ithaca (10-1-1)
    9. Washington and Lee (8-1-2)
    10. Roanoke (9-0-2)
    11. Chicago, 12. John Carroll, 13. Rensselaer, 14. Connecticut C., 15. Hardin-Simmons, 16. Messiah, 17. Mary Washington, 18. Cortland, 19. Mount Union, 20. Catholic, 21. Penn State Behrend, 22. Rowan, 23. Christopher Newport, 24. Ohio Wesleyan, 25. Middlebury.

    >> Higher: Chicago (+8), Rensselaer (+7), Messiah (+7)
    >> Lower: Hardin-Simmons (-8), Mary Washington (-7)
    >> In: Christopher Newport, Ohio Wesleyan
    >> Out: Loras, Rochester



    Soccer (W) - United Soccer Coaches
    1. Messiah (10-1)
    2. Middlebury (8-0-1)
    3. Christopher Newport (10-0-2)
    4. William Smith (8-1-1)
    5. Washington-St. Louis (10-1-1)
    6. Johns Hopkins (7-1-3)
    7. College of New Jersey (10-1)
    8. Pomona-Pitzer (9-0-1)
    9. Wheaton, Ill. (10-1-1)
    10. MIT (9-1-2)
    11. Chicago, 12. Centre, 13. Tufts, 14. Arcadia, 15. Geneseo, 16. Case Western Reserve, 17. Dickinson, 18. New York U., 19. Rochester, 20. St. Thomas, 21. Otterbein, 22. Wesleyan, 23. Stevens, 24. Williams, 25. Trinity, Texas

    >> Moving Up: Centre (+3)
    >> Moving Down: Case Western (-6), St. Thomas (-3)
    >> Hello: NYU, Trinity, Texas
    >> Bye-Bye: Puget Sound, Connecticut College


    Soccer (W) - D3Soccer.com
    1. Messiah (10-1)
    2. Middlebury (8-0-1)
    3. Christopher Newport (10-0-2)
    4. College of New Jersey (10-1)
    5. Washington-St. Louis (10-1-1)
    6. William Smith (8-1-1)
    7. Johns Hopkins (7-1-3)
    8. Wheaton, Ill. (10-1-1)
    9. Centre (13-0)
    10. Pomona-Pitzer (9-0-1)
    11. Chicago, 12. MIT, 13. Tufts, 14. Williams, 15. Arcadia, 16. Washington and Lee, 17. Amherst, 18. Dickinson, 19. Trinity, Texas, 20. Randolph-Macon, 21. Emory, 22. Case Western Reserve, 23. Swarthmore, 24. Stevens, 25. Gettysburg

    >> Higher: Washington and Lee (+4)
    >> Lower: Case Western (-7), Emory (-3)
    >> In: Gettysburg
    >> Out: St. Thomas


    Field Hockey - NFHCA
    1. Middlebury (10-0)
    2. College of New Jersey (9-0)
    3. Salisbury (9-1)
    4. Rowan (8-1)
    5. Vassar (10-0)
    6. Bowdoin (8-1)
    7. Tufts (7-2)
    8. Franklin & Marshall (9-1)
    9. Williams (9-1)
    10. Johns Hopkins (8-2)
    11. Ursinus, 12. Messiah, 13. Bates, 14. Christopher Newport, 15. Centre, 16. Kean, 17. Colby, 18. Montclair State, 19. Babson, 20. Lynchburg. 

    >> Moving Up: Bowdoin, Williams, Kean (+2)
    >> Moving Down: Tufts, Ursinus, CNU, Montclair (-2)
    >> Hello: Lynchburg
    >> Goodbye: Trinity


    Volleyball - AVCA
    1. Emory (15-1)
    2. Calvin (13-1)
    3. Chicago (16-1)
    4. Carthage (18-1)
    5. Saint Benedict (17-1)
    6. Berry (15-3)
    7. Claremont-M-S (14-3)
    8. Colorado College (18-2)
    9. UW-Whitewater (14-3)
    10. Trinity, Texas (16-4)
    11. Ohio Northern, 12. Johns Hopkins, 13. Carnegie Mellon, T14. Juniata, T14. Tufts, 16. Augsburg, 17. Johnson & Wales, R.I., 18. St. Thomas (Minn.), 19. Muskingum, 20. Hope, 21. Transylvania, 22. UW-Eau Claire, 23. Babson, 24. Wesleyan, Conn., 25. Wittenberg. 

    >> Moving Up: Johns Hopkins (+4), Tufts (+3)
    >> Moving Down: Augsburg (-5), UW-Eau Claire (-4)


     
    6. Different Conference, Same Result

    After claiming six Midwest Conference titles in a row, the Grinnell College women's golf team moved over to the St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SLIAC) as an affiliate member this season.

    But the result was the same, as the Pioneers fired a 330 Tuesday at The Links golf course to claim the SLIAC title and earn the league's automatic berth to the NCAA Division III National Tournament next spring.  It will mark the fourth trip to nationals in program history and the second in a row after the Pioneers placed ninth last spring.

    St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (W)
    The Links, Jacksonville, Ill.

    1. Grinnell 651, 2. Illinois College 663, 3. Lake Forest 673, 4. Monmouth 682, 5. Knox 729, 6. Fontbonne 755, 7. Iowa Wesleyan 792, 8. Blackburn 932, 9. Eureka 1013, 10. Westminster 1028, Spalding NTS, Monmouth NTS

    T1. Nina Kouchi (G) 153, T1. Kassidy Wallin (S) 153, 3. Shelby Keen (K) 157, T4. Amanda Lee (LF) 158, T4. Teresa Diez Dorta (IW) 158. Kouchi won playoff on 1st extra hole

     

    7.  1 Gymnastics Thing
     



    Simone Biles, who is 22 years old, "just officially became the most decorated female gymnast in history," CNN reports.
    • Biles "won her 21st World Championship medal in Stuttgart, Germany. (The win Tuesday beats the record of retired gymnast Svetlana Khorkina, who had 20.)"
    The bottom line: 15 of her 21 medals are gold, CNN notes.